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Krampus is the Christmas Devil

Updated on December 2, 2015

Krampus the Christmas Devil

Let me begin by saying that Krampus is older than Jesus Christ himself. Krampus is said to be a half Goat and half beast. He's got dark hair, fangs, a long tongue, and horns. He is said to be the complete opposite of good old Saint Nick. Krampus carries with him birch sticks to beat naughty children. He wears chains and bells- I am thinking this is to make noise to scare the children. Krampus is said to drag naughty children into the underworld wear he lives.

Although there have been many names made up for Krampus, two things are clear. He is said to be the evil counterpart of old Saint Nick who brings good children presents and he is said to be the son of Hel from Norse mythology. The night before December 6th he comes and this is known as Krampusnacht aka Krampus night. Children would leave boots outside their homes and if they were brought presents, that means they were good, if they were brought a rod, they were bad. December 6th is Nikolaustag aka St. Nicholas day. So it is fitting that Krampusnacht is the night before Nikolaustag. One night is meant for bad children and the other for good children.

As you can tell by the original names of the days and of Krampus, this legend originated in Germany some time ago. There are some people who still believe in this legend and celebrate by dressing up as Krampus. Much like we do for Halloween to fool creatures from hell or even Lucifer from stealing our souls.

Krampus has been becoming popular again though the movies. I saw a movie recently at my sister's home. It caught my attention to how true this story really was. I admit, I did not watch it all the way through because I did not like how a little girl had what looked like a voodoo doll and was controlling this thing. I am aware that there is a new movie, but honesty, the myth alone scares me so I will not be seeing the movies.

The Real Santa

The True Story of Christmas

Krampus may be just a legend to scare young children into being good throughout the year, but Saint Nicholas or Santa, as people now call him, comes from a real origin. The real Saint Nicholas was born over 1,500 years ago and lived in Myra, a city in modern day Turkey. His parents had passed away when he was a young boy. St. Nicholas was Christian and he became a Bishop and did some traveling. He was a wealthy man and he gave away money and gifts in secret. Because of his kindness and wisdom, the roman emperor at that time ordered all citizen to worship St. Nicholas as a God.

Since Christians believe in worshiping only one God, some citizens did not like this idea. St. Nicholas himself and some citizens did not go along with the Emperor's order to treat St. Nicholas as a God. The emperor imprisoned those who did not obey his order. St. Nicholas was imprisoned and spent more than five years in a prison cell. Years later after there was a new Emperor, St. Nicholas was released. He continued to live the remainder of his life generously and was a kind man.

In England during the 1500s people didn't worship St. Nicholas himself, just his actions of giving gifts. That is where the name Father Christmas comes from. Over time people made up different stories about St. Nicholas as the stories became more widespread.

The name Santa Claus came from the Dutch pronunciation of Saint Nicholas (Sinter Klass). When the Dutch moved into America, they brought the stories with them of Sinter Klass, and the children started to say the word Santa instead of Sinter and Claus fo Klass because it was easier to say for young children.





What do you think about Krampus?

Is the legend true?

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Krampus- Official Movie Trailer

Krampus-The Christmas Devil

The story of Christmas Krampus

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