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Natural Easter Egg Dyes: How to Make Natural Dyes

Updated on August 30, 2011

Making Organic Easter Egg Dyes

Create Easter eggs with an organic, homemade appeal with simple, natural dye recipes. Natural dyes can be made from many sources, including vegetables, spices, native plants, berries, and plant roots or tree bark.

Warning: Do not use any item which may be toxic for Easter Egg dyes. If unsure about the safety of wild plants, it is better to use items found in the produce section of the grocery store. Daffodils, poinsettias, foxglove, and many other plants are highly toxic and are NOT suitable as Easter Egg dyes.

Making organic, natural Easter Egg dyes is not only a fun activity, but it saves the landfills from all the packaging from commercial dye products. Almost any item in the local produce department can become a raw material for creating a dye: experiment and have fun!

Children can participate in the fun of creating the dyes, and predict what color the natural dye will produce. By using a variety of natural materials, eggs can be dyed in almost every color of the rainbow!

Easter eggs colored with organic dye.
Easter eggs colored with organic dye. | Source

Finding Dye Materials

Vegetable and fruit dye materials can be found in the grocery store: everything from red cabbage to onion skins are in the produce aisle. Spices are easy to obtain from the cabinet, shedding bark is often abundant in backyards or local parks. Search local hiking trails for native plants and berries, but be sure to verify the legality of picking native wildflowers or plants in the local region prior to going on a plant hunt!


Recipes for Natural Yellow Dyes

Turmeric Dye: A vibrant yellow dye can be made from the following:

Mix 0.5 oz. ground tumeric with 1.5 quarts of water. Boil for 30 minutes in a stainless steel pot. Stir the simmering dye occasionally. To use the dye, add 1 cup dye to 1 tablespoon white vinegar. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is colored.

Orange or Lemon Peel Dye: A yellow dye can be made from orange or lemon peels:

Grate the peel of an orange or lemon and add to 1 quart of water. Boil for 30 minutes in a stainless steel pot, stirring occasionally. To use the dye, add 1 cup dye to 1 tablespoon white vinegar. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is colored.

Chamomile Tea Dye: Chamomile tea will dye egg shells a pale yellow shade:

Boil Chamomile tea to create a strong brew. Add 1 cup of the tea to 1 tablespoon of white vinegar, and soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is colored.

Recipes for Red Egg Dyes

Canned Cherry Dye: Canned cherries (with juice) will make a brilliant red dye:

Blend cherries and juice in a blender. Add 1 cup of blended cherry juice to 1 tablespoon of white vinegar. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is colored.

Beet Dye: A deep red dye can be made from beets:

Add 1 cup of deep red beet juice to 1 tablespoon of vinegar. Soak a hard boiled egg in the beet dye until the shell is the desired color.

Crushed Cranberry Dye: Crushed cranberries can make a red dye:

Crush cranberries (do not use cranberry sauce or jelly). Boil the cranberries until a red liquid is produced. Add 1 tablespoon of while vinegar to 1 cup of the red cranberry juice. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is colored.

An egg soaking in a dye made from crushed grapes.
An egg soaking in a dye made from crushed grapes. | Source

Recipes for Blue/Purple Egg Dyes

Red Cabbage Dye: Red cabbage will make a blue/purple dye:

Boil red cabbage leaves for 30 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored water from the red cabbage leaves. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is the desired color.

Crushed Blueberry Dye: Blueberries make an excellent blue dye:

Crush blueberries and add a little water to thin the mixture. Pour off the blueberry "juice" from this mixture and add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of blueberry liquid. Soak a hard boiled egg until the desired color is obtained.

Grape Juice Dye: A purple-blue color can be obtained from grape juice:

Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of grape juice. Soak a hard-boiled egg until the shell is colored.

Recipes for Green Egg Dyes

Spinach Dye: Boil spinach leaves for 30 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored water from the spinach. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is the desired color.

Green Tea: Prepare a strong brew of green tea. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the tea. Soak a hard boiled egg in the tea until the shell is the desired hue.

Grass: Boil grass for 30 minutes. Strain the mixture and reserve the colored water. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored water. Soak a hard boiled egg until the desired shade is obtained.


News Report on Natural Easter Egg Dyes

Recipes for Natural Orange Egg Dyes

Onion Skin Dye: Boil onion skins in water for 30 minutes. Strain and reserve the colored water. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored water: soak a hard boiled egg until it is the desired shade. This will make an orange-brown egg.

Carrot Dye: Grate several carrots and boil for 30 minutes. Strain and reserve the colored water. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored liquid. Soak a hard boiled egg until the desired shade has been obtained.

Butternut Dye: Use the seed husks from butternut squash: boil for 30 minutes. Strain and reserve the colored water. Add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 cup of the colored liquid. Soak a hard boiled egg until the shell is the desired color.

What Have You Used to Make a Natural Dye? Leave a Comment!

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    • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

      Leah Lefler 

      7 years ago from Western New York

      It is a really fun activity to do with kids. Spices make great dyes!

    • jaisee profile image

      jaisee 

      7 years ago from California

      I can't wait to dig through my fridge and cupboard to make dye for this year's eggs!

    • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

      Leah Lefler 

      7 years ago from Western New York

      It is a fun "experiment" with the kids. Some vegetables also work as pH detectors, and may change color when you add the vinegar. That surprises the kids, too!

    • cheapsk8chick profile image

      cheapsk8chick 

      7 years ago

      All awesome ideas! I can't wait to try some of these with my kids. I have a feeling a new tradition will be started! Thanks for the hub and the great ideas! Voted & Rated!

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