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Traditional and Native American Thanksgiving Coloring Pages

Updated on November 6, 2017
Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Ms. Inglish has 30 years of successful experience in medicine, psychology, STEM courses, and aerospace education (CAP).

Old legendary figures: Coyote and Possum.
Old legendary figures: Coyote and Possum.

Thanksgiving Excitement Continues

A huge advertising campaign was begun and maintained by one woman in 1840. This was Sarah Hale, magazine owner, who sent America into a magnificent celebration of a Thanksgiving holiday, even if all elements of the advertisements were not strictly true.

The holiday is fun and all the excitement seems to have lasted for over one hundred sixty years. Part of that excitement is coloring holiday images.

We hear complaints of Thanksgiving overshadowed by Christmas advertising before Halloween is even finished, but we can still be positive. Some interesting coloring pages will help families with children maintain some Thanksgiving excitement.

Source

The headdress pictured above is of the type worn by Plains Native Americans instead of those early settlers met at Plymouth, but the image is still great fun to color

A Set of Thanksgiving Pictures to Color

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Turkey, goose, duck, and pheasant are the most popular fowl prepared on Thanksgiving in America.
Source
Turkey, goose, duck, and pheasant are the most popular fowl prepared on Thanksgiving in America.
Turkey, goose, duck, and pheasant are the most popular fowl prepared on Thanksgiving in America.

Free Coloring Pages and Fun Activities

At Thanksgiving, let's present additional high quality coloring pages for the kids that picture more about real-life American History than they may have been taught in school.

We know that there were no such things as "pilgrims" at the time, attired all in black, but rather, people that called themselves "saints" and wore brightly colored, though inexpensive clothing. Their fellow travelers on the Mayflower were secular people that the saints called "strangers."

Sarah Hale painted the early Thanksgiving in New England as a more religious observance in her women's magazine, but she helped the Thanksgiving Holiday to become a major feast and even a shopping holiday. All this built business and made people happy.

A tradition emerged of the lower classes in England coming to or, being sent away to, the New World for a better life. Many did find a good life here,. although many died at first.

The saints nearly starved to death the first winter, but the Native American man, Massasoit, and his people from the Wampanoag Nation helped to save them with food and good instruction in agriculture.

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Source
First Light
First Light | Source

The Wampanoag's name means People of the First Light.

People of the First Light

The Wampanoag's name means "People of the First Light."

This name might mean a number of things, but these East Coast Native North Americans were some of the first on the continent to see the sun rise each morning, because they were at the eastern edge of the land. Similarly, the Mohawk were known as the "Keepers of the Eastern Gate."

Some of the information about Thanksgiving may be shocking, but it can lead us into forming our own good traditions for an American Thanksgiving Holiday that we can truthfully call our own. People can make their own rules and traditions for holidays, and so it should be.

Some of the free coloring pages offered here originated at the Zwolle Elementary School in Zwolle, Louisiana.

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In 1621, Massasoit and his band of native Americans in what is now Massachusetts grew 20 acres of corn and shared it with the English settlers. In the Southwest especially, corn is known as "maize."
In 1621, Massasoit and his band of native Americans in what is now Massachusetts grew 20 acres of corn and shared it with the English settlers. In the Southwest especially, corn is known as "maize."
In 1621, Massasoit and his band of native Americans in what is now Massachusetts grew 20 acres of corn and shared it with the English settlers. In the Southwest especially, corn is known as "maize."
Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Mohawk Longhouse.
Source
Source
Source
Mohawk Longhouse.
Mohawk Longhouse. | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Tiger Lily, 1907
Tiger Lily, 1907
Tiger Lily, 1907 | Source
Native American Science Fair
Native American Science Fair

The Birds of Thanksgiving.

In 1621, there were no Modern American Turkeys like the kind that are huge and take only a few to fill up a freezer case in your local grocery store or supermarket.The wild turkeys in our parks today are not fat.

The giant fat turkeys have been bred to produce abundant meat supplies that often sell for extremely low prices with an additional $10 or $50 purchase in November and December.

Amazingly, celery that is $3.00 per bunch the rest of the year also reduces in price. Regardless, there were no fat turkeys and no celery at all at the first feast shared by approximately 150 English "Puritans", other settlers ("Strangers"), and the Wampanoag Nation that sent wild turkeys and deer over after a single man of them invited 90 male tribe members. He believed in his tribal nation;s custom of sharing and invited others and brought most of the food as well.

A variety of wild game birds were abundant in Massachusetts in 1621 and these are the birds that the Native Americans normally consumed after giving thanks to them for helping them to survive by becoming food.

These wild game birds included pheasants, ducks, geese, quail, ruffed grouse, and wild turkeys as well as a few others. However, pheasants, ducks, and geese made up the majority of the fowl brought to the feast by Massasoit.

These birds, much like the region's abundant and varied fish, grew larger than they do today, because they were not over-hunted and had more food sources for themselves in the 1600s than they do today. As human populations encroached on their living spaces, food sources dwindled and these birds became somewhat smaller as time progressed.

Today, the wild turkey is the official Massachusetts State Game Bird.

Wild turkeys are not fat. These are the turkeys that might have been at the first feast between Native Americans and the English. However, it was probably mostly pheasants and ducks, along with 5 deer. Modern American turkeys are bred to become so fa
Wild turkeys are not fat. These are the turkeys that might have been at the first feast between Native Americans and the English. However, it was probably mostly pheasants and ducks, along with 5 deer. Modern American turkeys are bred to become so fa

Native American Pictographs to Use and Color

Native Americans used these word-pictures to communicate and to tell stories that were handed down from generation to generation.
Native Americans used these word-pictures to communicate and to tell stories that were handed down from generation to generation. | Source
White Tail Deer
White Tail Deer

A White Tail Deer to Color

How to color a white tail deer:

  • Leave these areas white: chin, behind the nose, the belly, and the underside of the tail (this is why this deer is called a White Tail Deer.
  • Antlers are usually a very light brown.
  • All the rest of this deer's hair is light to darker brown. The body is lighter and the back and lower legs tend to be bit darker.

Massasoit and his 90 or so Native American family and friends (called a "band") brought the English settlers 5 large deer for dinner in addition to many wild game birds. The deer were likely white tail deer, native to the area that becaem the State of Massachusetts. Elk and Moose were also abundant in the area in the 1600s and were uses for food as well, after thanks was properly given according to custom.

All parts of these animals were used and nothing at all was wasted. Bones and antlers became weapons and tools, even sewing needles. Hides became clothing and tent/wigwam walls. Each part of the animal found a use.

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Source
Source

Other Foods

The Wampanoag also ate beans and squash that they were successful in growing, hunted the black bear and caught a variety of fish in what is now Massasachusetts. The State Fish today is the Atlantic Cod and it might have been consumed by the Wampanoags in the 1600s, but other possibilities, especially inland or fresh water types, include several dozen different varieties of fish.

Native Americans caught fish all over the Western Hemisphere. The coloring page below came from a group of students studying Native Americans in Lousiana.

Source

© 2008 Patty Inglish

Comments

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    • chloebaby profile image

      chloebaby 

      8 years ago

      I'm still learning how to construct proper hubpages your hubs are very inspiring.

    • Bima.Purnawan1 profile image

      Bima.Purnawan1 

      8 years ago from Republic of Indonesia

      Thank you for all the research you must do,,

    • Dim Flaxenwick profile image

      Dim Flaxenwick 

      8 years ago from Great Britain

      Thank you for all the research you must do, . I am fascinated by all the Native American tribes and their beliefs,...

    • wsp2469 profile image

      wsp2469 

      8 years ago from Alta Loma, Ca

      I owe you an apology, Patti. I honestly thought you were nothing but business. You obviously do other things some times. I'm glad to see that.

      To be honest, some of your fellow top scorers have some really boring hubs. (I know I'm an @sshole but it's the truth.) I'm glad to see you stretch sometimes!

    • UPStar profile image

      UPStar 

      8 years ago

      This is wonderful. I love having things for the kids to do and learn. thanksgiving is my favorite holiday!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile imageAUTHOR

      Patty Inglish 

      9 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      Glad you like this, WhiteOak! - Thanks for visiting. :)

    • WhiteOak profile image

      Eva Thomas 

      9 years ago from Georgia

      Fantastic idea!!

    • Netters profile image

      Netters 

      9 years ago from Land of Enchantment - NM

      I like it. I think it's a great idea! Thank you.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile imageAUTHOR

      Patty Inglish 

      9 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      Thanks Earth Angel -- I think these pictures are great for kids without drilling on al the battling that went on. Hope people find it fun!

    • Earth Angel profile image

      Earth Angel 

      9 years ago

      LOVE your Hubs Patty!!

      Thank you for sharing!!

      Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

      Blessings always, Earth Angel!!

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