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Tips for creating invitation wording for a royal wedding theme.

Updated on February 27, 2009

A wedding royale means formality of the highest order.

When planning a wedding in royal style - in fact, when planning any event - the invitations set the tone. A well-thought-out invitation starts the party, and makes people want to come.

If you're planning a royal theme - a real Cinderella-style shindig - you need to decide: are you REALLY going royal, or are you just playing fairy princess?

If you're going fairy-princess, then you have a little room to play around. You can choose a lavender paper, and decorate it with gilded scrolling. You can be whimsical with your wording, for example:

Line #1: The kingdom of <your surname here>
Line #2: announces the royal wedding of
Line #3: the Princess <bride's first name>
Line #4: daughter of King <bride's father's first name> and Queen <bride's mother's first name>
Line #5: to the Prince <groom's first name>
Line #6: of the kingdom of <groom's surname>
Line #7: son of King <groom's father's first name> and Queen <groom's mother's first name>
Line #8: at the Royal Palace
Line #9: <address of hall or home>
Line #10: <city, village or town>
Line #11: on <day, spelled out, like so: Saturday, the tenth of June, two thousand and nine>
Line #12: at <time, spelled out, like so: six o'clock p.m.>

If the wedding itself will take place at a church, synagogue, or other place of worship first, with a reception to follow elsewhere, then you might word it differently:

Line #1: The kingdom of <your surname here>
Line #2: announces the royal wedding of
Line #3: the Princess <bride's first name>
Line #4: daughter of King <bride's father's first name> and Queen <bride's mother's first name>
Line #5: to the Prince <groom's first name>
Line #6: of the kingdom of <groom's surname>
Line #7: son of King <groom's father's first name> and Queen <groom's mother's first name>
Line #8: at <place of worship>
Line #9: <address>
Line #10: <city, village or town>
Line #11: on <day, spelled out, like so: Saturday, the tenth of June, two thousand and nine>
Line #12: at <time, spelled out, like so: six o'clock p.m.>
Line #13: Reception to follow immediately at the Royal Palace
Line #14: at <address of hall>
Line #15: <etc.>

However: if you want to take a more serious approach, you can decide on a more formally worded invitation. An actual wedding invitation sent by any member of a royal family would adhere to strictly formal standards of ettiquette.

Here's how to do that:

In a formally worded wedding invitation, abbreviate absolutely nothing, not even a middle initial. Rather than abbreviate, omit. You'll even spell out the year, as in: "Two thousand and nine."

It's a matter of personal prefence as to whether or not you choose to go with the American or British spellings of "honor" (American) or "honour" (British) when you write phrases like "request the honor of your presence." Typically, however, it's considered a little pretentiious - usually - to go with the British spelling, but in the case of a royal wedding, the British spelling might work well.

Speaking of "requesting the honour," one "requests the honour" of one's presence at a place of worship," and one requests the "pleasure of one's company" at a reception hall.

Use Roman numerals, rather than Jr., or the 3rd, when writing out names.

Traditionally, the parents of the bride "officially" host the wedding, no matter who, in reality, is footing the bill. Here's how that invitation would be worded:

Mr. and Mrs. John Michael Doe
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jane Marie
and
Mr. James Peter Smith
on Saturday, the seventeenth of June
two thousand and ten
at two o'clock
First Presbyterian Church
123 Main Street
Anytown, Montana

Lately, though, even traditional parents like to include the groom's parents in the invite, since often they are kept as keepsakes.

Here's how that would look like:

Mr. and Mrs. John Michael Doe
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jane Marie
and
Mr. James Peter Smith
son of
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick James Smith
on Saturday, the seventeenth of June
two thousand and ten
at two o'clock
First Presbyterian Church
123 Main Street
Anytown, Montana

Sometimes the couple is hosting the wedding - these days, couples are getting married after living together for some time. and are paying for the whole thing themselves. Here's that one:

OPTIONAL: (Together with their families)
Jane Anne Jones
and
James Peter Doe
request the honor of your presence
at their marriage
on Saturday, the seventeenth of June
two thousand and ten
at two o’clock
First Presbyterian Church
123 Main Street
Anytown, Montana

Divorced parents? There's a formula for that, too:

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Gomez
and
Mr. and Mrs. John Michael Doe
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Jane Marie
and
Mr. James Peter Doe
son of
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick James Doe
on Saturday, the seventeenth of June
two thousand and ten
at two o'clock
First Presbyterian Church
123 Main Street
Anytown, Montana

Has the bride's mother remarried? Etiquette thinks of EVERYTHING! (This same invitation works if the bride's mother is single - just leave off the husband.)

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Gomez
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of Mrs. Gomez’ daughter
Jane Marie
and
Mr. James Peter Doe
(son of
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick James Doe) - OPTIONAL
on Saturday, the seventeenth of June
two thousand and ten
at two o'clock
First Presbyterian Church
123 Main Street
Anytown, Montana




a royal bride

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A tiara for a royal bride

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      Theme Wedding Planner 

      8 years ago

      Great page, I love some of your ideas. If you are interested in idea exchange, you may want to check out the page linked to my name. It's one of the few articles with creative and now ideas. Thanks for the post.

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