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Gifts for Weavers

Updated on August 17, 2015

Do you have a fiber weaver on your gift giving list? What is the perfect gift? The list below will give you some great ideas. This list is for those who weave fiber, not baskets. The list is alphabetical with a short description of what each tool does. And you thought all they needed was a loom and some thread.

Before you begin your search, you will need to find out what sort of weaving they do. The type of loom will tell you. From there, select gifts related to that type of weaving/loom.

A google search will find all of the tools listed below online. Offline may be a bit more of a challenge. You will be able to find some of the items at a large craft store, but you will be better off finding a store that specializes in spinning and/or weaving.

Probably the most desired gift from a weaver is thread or yarn. Just as a knitter loves new yarn, so does a weaver. Finding something that is unique is the best bet, something your weaver wouldnât ordinarily buy for themselves.

If your weaver is choosy about their tools, which many are, you might instead purchase a gift card coupled with something fun like a tote bag, coffee mug, calendar or T-shirt.

Types of Looms

Floor Loom – As you can imagine, this is a large loom that takes up a fair amount of space. These looms are used for production work and larger pieces.

Table Loom – They look similar to the floor loom only much smaller. They are portable with springs to hold them down. They are great for learning the craft, while offering the ability to do more complex work like on the floor loom.

Rigid Heddle Loom – A simple table top loom great for beginners. They do not offer the flexibility as a table loom in exchange for a lower price.

Tapestry Frame Loom – A very simple loom that looks sort of like a big picture frame on a stand.

Navajo Loom – A larger form of a tapestry frame loom

Back Strap Loom – What you might see in a third world country. It is a simple loom with two sticks between which the warps are stretched.

The B List

Batten/ Swords – Used for simpler weaving methods such as Navajo or tapestry, the batten or sword does the job of the reed. The batten has a beveled edge on one side which is used to press the thread into place. Battens come in different sizes.

Beaters – As you are weaving, a beater is a tool that is used to push the weft yarn securely into place. They come in a variety of sizes and weights.

Bobbins/Cops/Quills – For storing all the threads you will be using in your weaving.

Bobbin Rack – For use with more complex projects, a bobbin rack will keep all your different threads in place while warping.

Bobbin/Cone Winder – Used to wind the threads onto your bobbins, cops or quills.

Books – There are a variety of books of the subject of weaving. Below is a sampling:

  • Learning to Weave
  • by Deborah Chandler
  • The Handweaver's Pattern Directory
  • by Anne Dixon
  • Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving
  • by Betty Linn Davenport
  • Weaving the Rainbow
  • by George Ella Lyon and Stephanie Anderson
  • The Weaver's Companion
  • by Madelyn van der Hoogt
  • The Weaver's Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom
  • by Jane Patrick
  • Weaving As an Art Form: A Personal Statement
  • by Theo Moorman
  • Weaving: A Handbook of the Fiber Arts
  • by Shirley E. Held
  • Weaving for Beginners: An Illustrated Guide
  • by Peggy Osterkamp
  • Weaving The Navajo Way, How To Create Rugs, Miniatures and More!
  • by Caroline M. Spurgeon

A Few Good Books

More Gift Ideas

Tapestry Weaving
Tapestry Weaving

Fringe Twister – After much use, the warp threads can become tangled and worn. Twisting is a good way to prevent this, but doing it by hand is slow and difficult to keep uniform. The fringe twister does the job for you.

Heddle, Blocks, Hook – A heddle is a long stick with an eye at one end which is used to separate the warp threads. Heddle hooks are used to pass the thread through the eye of the heddle. The heddle block holds the heddle in a particular position. A second set is used for complex patterns.

Magazine Subscription – Give the gift that keeps on giving.

  1. Handwoven
  2. Piecework
  3. Shuttle, Spindle and Dyepot
  4. Weaver’s Craft
  5. Journal for Weavers, Spinners and Dyers

Mangle – Think of an old fashioned wringer washer. A mangle is similar to the wringer part. It is used as a finisher for your completed project, flattening and smoothing. Leaves a nice shine to the fabric. A mangle can be used cold or they come with steam heat.

Shuttles and More

Pick-Up Sticks – Look similar to a batten but much smaller. They are used for picking up or holding down threads to alter the pattern of the weave.

Self Adhesive Measuring Tape – It’s like a fabric tape measure with scotch tape on the back. Great for keeping track of how much you have woven without having to stop and use a tape measure every time. The sticky does not stay on the fabric and it can be re-used.

Shuttle – The shuttle is used to hold the thread during weaving. The shuttle is passed across the loom between the warp threads in order to weave it with the weft. Shuttles come a variety of sizes and shapes, each with a slightly different use.

  • Stick Shuttle
  • – the thread is simply wrapped around the stick which has forks at each end. They are used for narrow weaving or thick weft yarns.
  • Ski Shuttle
  • – the thread is wrapped around the top of the stick onto hooks. It is used primarily for rug weaving.
  • Boat Shuttle
  • – The thread is wrapped around a bobbin in the center of the stick. Makes for swift weaving.
  • End Delivery/Feed Shuttle
  • – Looks similar to a boat shuttle except the thread is wound around a pirn and passes through a tensioner when weaving. It is primarily used for fine threads.

More Gifts to Consider

Steam Press – Just like you might see at a dry cleaners. A steam press is different from a mangle in that it closes down flat on your fabric while the mangle rolls the fabric flat.

Thread/Yarn – Threads come in all sizes, shapes, colors and fibers.

Treadle Tracker – Like a tiny clipboard, it is a great way to keep track of your treadling sequences or special weaving notations. It is attached to your loom castle.

Are you a Weaver?

What loom do you use?

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The End of the List

Warp Extender – Instead of winding your warp around the warp beam, you can use a warp extender. You can wrap enough thread for your entire project and keeps the tension as you work. Typically it is used for rugs or larger pieces.

Warping Board, Reel – Used for measuring warp. While the board is strictly manual, the real does much of the work for you.

Weaving Temples/Stretcher – The temple is a bar with teeth that is inserted at the selvedge edge of your weaving. It adjusts to the width of your weaving, keeping it the same throughout your project.

Yarn Swift – Holds the skein of yarn while you unwind it and keeps it from getting tangled.

Do you have a weaver on your gift list?

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    • jpcmc profile image

      JP Carlos 2 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

      I never get bought there were lots of looms. I never saw my self weaving something but it sure looks cHallenging. I've seen lots of beautiful products and they just awesome.