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Jewish Holiday Dates from 2014-2019

Updated on March 29, 2015
Yom Kippur is the most holy day in the Jewish calendar, in which Jews fast and pray to atone for their sins and prepare for a fresh start in the New Year.
Yom Kippur is the most holy day in the Jewish calendar, in which Jews fast and pray to atone for their sins and prepare for a fresh start in the New Year. | Source

Because Jewish holidays are based on the Jewish calendar, which has a different number of days from our conventional Roman calendar, it's pretty impossible keep track of the holidays without a cheat sheet. Here's a complied list of the dates of major Jewish holidays from 2014 through 2019.

Keep in mind that in the Jewish faith, holidays typically last from sunset to sunset. So if Rosh Hashana is from September 25-26, for example, that means it starts at sundown on September 24th and ends at sundown on September 26th. The first date listed is the first full day of each holiday; celebration starts at sundown the night before.

Bolded dates are those that are yom tov. Yom tov means that the day is treated with the same rules as Shabbat, no matter what day of the week it falls on.

Purim

Purim is a day of celebration. Jewish people typically feast, exchange gifts, and dress in masks and costumes.
Purim is a day of celebration. Jewish people typically feast, exchange gifts, and dress in masks and costumes. | Source

2014

Purim: Mar 16th

Pesach (Passover): Apr 15-16, Apr 17-20, Apr 21-22

Shavuot: Jun 4-5

Tish'a B'Av: Aug 5

Rosh Hashana: Sep 25-26 (The start of year 5775)

Yom Kippur: Oct 4

Sukkot: Oct 9-10, Oct 11-15

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 16

Simchat Torah: Oct 17

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 17-24

Pesach

Pesach, or Passover, remembers the journey of the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt. It coincides with the Christian celebration, Easter.
Pesach, or Passover, remembers the journey of the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt. It coincides with the Christian celebration, Easter. | Source

Shavout

Shavout celebrates the anniversary of God giving the Torah to the Jewish people. The multi-day observance is based around Torah studies and the eating of special foods that largely commemorate grain harvest. "Chag Sameach" means "Happy Holiday."
Shavout celebrates the anniversary of God giving the Torah to the Jewish people. The multi-day observance is based around Torah studies and the eating of special foods that largely commemorate grain harvest. "Chag Sameach" means "Happy Holiday." | Source

2015

Purim: Mar 5

Pesach (Passover): Apr 4-5, Apr 6-9, Apr 10-11

Shavuot: May 24-25

Tish'a B'Av: Jul 26

Rosh Hashana: Sep 14-15 (the start of year 5776)

Yom Kippur: Sep 23

Sukkot: Sep 28-29, Sep 30-Oct 4

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 5

Simchat Torah: Oct 6

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 7-14

Tisha B'Av

Tisha B'Av is a solemn commemoration of the destruction of Jewish temples. All pleasurable activity is explicitly forbidden. This is not one of the most exciting holidays for Jewish people.
Tisha B'Av is a solemn commemoration of the destruction of Jewish temples. All pleasurable activity is explicitly forbidden. This is not one of the most exciting holidays for Jewish people.

2016

Purim: Mar 24

Pesach (Passover): Apr 23-24. Apr 25-28. Apr 29-30

Shavuot: Jun 12-13

Tish'a B'Av: Aug 14

Rosh Hashana: Oct 3-4 (the start of year 5777)

Yom Kippur: Oct 12

Sukkot: Oct 17-18, Oct 19-23

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 24

Simchat Torah: Oct 25

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 25-Jan 1, 2017

What is Rosh Hashana?

Rosh Hashana

Rosh Hashana, one of the holiest days of the Jewish year, celebrates the New Year. Traditions include attending services, sounding the shofar, and eating apples and honey (for a sweet new year).

2017

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 25, 2016-Jan 1

Purim: Mar 12

Pesach (Passover): Apr 11-12, Apr 13-16, Apr 17-18

Shavuot: May 31-Jun 1

Tish'a B'Av: Aug 1

Rosh Hashana: Sep 21-22 (the start of year 5778)

Yom Kippur: Sep 30

Sukkot: Oct 5-6, Oct 7-11

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 12

Simchat Torah: Oct 13

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 13-20

Sukkot

Sukkot is the Jewish celebration of nature. Jewish people build a small house called a sukkah, which they eat, pray, and sleep in for the duration of Sukkot. It is a happy holiday.
Sukkot is the Jewish celebration of nature. Jewish people build a small house called a sukkah, which they eat, pray, and sleep in for the duration of Sukkot. It is a happy holiday.

Shmini Atzeret

Shimni Atzaret is the celebration of the Torah. It always occurs immediately after Sukkot.
Shimni Atzaret is the celebration of the Torah. It always occurs immediately after Sukkot. | Source

Simchat Torah

On this joyous holidays, Jewish people celebrate the end of a cycle of reading the Torah aloud and the beginning of a new cycle by singing and dancing with the Torah.
On this joyous holidays, Jewish people celebrate the end of a cycle of reading the Torah aloud and the beginning of a new cycle by singing and dancing with the Torah.

2018

Purim: Mar 12

Pesach (Passover): Mar 31-Apr 1, Apr 2-5, Apr 6-7

Shavuot: May 20-21

Tish'a B'Av: Jul 22

Rosh Hashana: Sep 10-11 (the start of year 5779)

Yom Kippur: Sep 19

Sukkot: Sep 24-25, Sep 26-30

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 1

Simchat Torah: Oct 2

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 3-10

2019

Purim: Mar 21

Pesach (Passover): Apr 20-21, Apr 22-25, Apr 26-27

Shavuot: Jun 9-10

Tish'a B'Av: Aug 11

Rosh Hashana: Sep 10-11 (the start of year 5780)

Yom Kippur: Sep 19

Sukkot: Sep 24-25, Sep 26-30

Shmini Atzeret: Oct 1

Simchat Torah: Oct 2

Hanukkah (Chanukah): Dec 3-10

Hanukkah

Hanukkah

Hanukkah is the most well-known Jewish holidays, but actually it is one of the most minor holidays to Jewish people themselves, and has just been inflated in order to be a Jewish version of Christmas. Nevertheless, many reform Jews love to celebrate Hanukkah, an eight-night festival that typically involves lighting candles and exchanging gifts.

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    • compugraphd profile image

      compugraphd 2 years ago

      ב"ה

      I'm sure it's just an oversight but no fasting on Rosh Hashana. Fasting on Yom Kippur, the tenth of Tishrei (and on Tzom Gedaliah, the third of Tishrei)

    • Hannah Elise profile image
      Author

      Hannah Moskowitz 2 years ago from New York

      Thank you!! Yes, that was a problem in editing; originally I had YK as the example in the first paragraph, and I forgot to change all the wording when I switched it!

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