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A Glimpse Into the Sublimity and Loftiness of Rumi’s Poetry - Monday's Inspiration, 21

Updated on March 17, 2018
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Manatita is an esteemed author living in London, UK. He writes spiritual books, flash fiction and esoteric poetry, his favourite genre.

Rumi
Rumi | Source

“Good poetry”, says the illumined Seer Hafiz,

“Makes the Universe admits a secret:

I am really just a tambourine.

Grab hold; play me against your warm thigh.”

We tend to remember the sublime poetry of those who came before us. Whether it’s Emily Dickinson with her ‘Hope’:

“Hope is the thing with feathers,

That perches in the soul.’

Or Blake’s, Auguries of Innocence:

“To see a World in a Grain of Sand

And a Heaven in a Wild Flower

Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand

And Eternity in an hour ….”

Quote from Rumi

Source

These great poets tend to have a profound effect on our psyche and in a conscious or unconscious way, do influence our day to day environment and the spirit of the nation.

It has been said that Mevlana Jalal Uddin Mohammed, known lovingly as Rumi in the West, was perhaps the most prolific poet that ever lived. Some say that he wrote 60,000 poems!

Far less than my spiritual teacher, Sri Chinmoy, of course, but Guruji wrote for some forty three plus years and has only recently passed. Rumi was a 13th century poet.

Still, Guruji says that it’s not really necessary to compare the God-souls, the Seers, for they all represent or manifest in different ways, the same one Source. It is the same Supreme who manifests in the form we call the Christ; in the personification of the Buddha and so forth.

Rumi was by all accounts, a God-intoxicated Soul. We can see this in the richness; the mystical depth, flow, vibrancy and authority of his poetry. A friend of mines once said that Rumi never wrote a single word which was out of place. I believe this whole heartedly. Let us examine just one of his poems:

Rumi's quote

Source

The Light of Love


Both Light and shadow,

Are the dance of Love.

Love has no cause,

It is the Astrolabe of God’s secrets.

Lover and loving are inseparable and timeless.

Although I may try to describe Love,

When I experience it, I am speechless.

Although I may try to write about Love,

I am rendered helpless.

My pen breaks, and the paper slips away,

To that ineffable place where

Lover, loving and Love are one.

Every moment is made glorious,

By the Light of Love.

Rumi begins by saying that ‘both Light and shadow are the dance of Love’. For Rumi, there is only Love; light and shadow are aspects of the same Source. Our good and our evil; our day and night, however painful, all spring from Love, the only Source; the Light …

“Love has no cause,” says Rumi. “It is the Astrolabe of God’s secrets.” Love is the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end and at the same time, without an end. It is an immortal journey, according to Sri Chinmoy, the 21st century visionary. It is a birthless and deathless ‘dance’, according to Rumi.

They call this a Lila (leela), in India, A Divine game, or one might say, the sacred play of the Absolute Supreme. Rumi likens it to the ‘astrolabe of God’s secrets.’ This is an astronomical instrument used for measuring the celestial spheres. One can say that the Divine Incarnations, are the astrolabes of God’s secret’s, just as Love also is. This equates to the fact that to know God, we have to embody that Love, God’s emissary of the New Jerusalem.

To continue, Rumi further tells us that Lover and loving, are inseparable and timeless. I have capitalised the word here, as in mystical philosophy, the true Lover is a man of God, a Christ, Buddha or Krishna. It is also used for a Seer or God-intoxicated seekers of Love. Nevertheless, the human lover, is also inseparable from God, but some are simply not conscious of this, because of the necessary veil, placed upon them by the Divine.

Quote from Rumi

Source

“Although I may try to describe Love,

When I experience it, I am speechless.

Although I may try to write about Love,

I am rendered helpless.

My pen breaks, and the paper slips away,

To that ineffable place where

Lover, loving and Love become one.”

Here Rumi tells us that Love is unspoken, speechless, unutterable… we cannot describe Love. He becomes helpless and his pen breaks,, whenever he tries to do so. Sri Ramakrishna, The great Paramahansa of Dakshineshwar, used to say that whenever he tried to describe it, he would get only so far and become lost in contemplation. Same thing happened to Rumi, as he says that ‘Lover, loving and Love, are One.’

They say in the East, in Yoga, that the Absolute in its highest aspect, is Silence; pure Existence, Consciousness and Bliss (Sat, Chit and Ananda).

Finally Rumi tells us, that it is the Light of Love that makes all things glorious. Light is synonymous with Love and vice versa. They cause all to manifest or unmanifest and create or project the wonder and awe in every aspect. Rumi calls this simply ‘glorious’, but it is an incredibly beautiful word, full of Light and Truth.

Rumi offers hope, solace and reassurance. For him, 'shadow' is a part of the 'dance' or only a lesser form of Light and as such, it is merely a question of degree. It also helps us and is a part of the divine plan.

Certainly Rumi’s poetry is a pinnacle of unprecedented beauty, and has been talking to us in the words of Robert Bly and Coleman Bark’s, two poetry scholars, for some time. He is also studied by many other authorities both East and West, with very favourable or powerful inspirations.

Still, the true teacher remains in the Heart of the God-lover; not the intellect of the mind, and as such more will be revealed as our Consciousness or Spirit unfolds, by the childlike simplicity of the Divine. Glory be!!

Manatita, The Lantern Carrier. 4th December, 2017

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© 2017 manatita44

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    • manatita44 profile image
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      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Yes. Rumi is the most famous of all the Persian mystics in the West. Hafiz is popular in Iran.. Guruji wrote about him, so I have known of him for some time. One of the greatest of women Seers, was Mirabai from India. Guruji said that she was unparalelled. Rabia was Persian and awesome too. They were all God-souls, very much like our St Theresa of Avila, St Theresa of Lieuxieux and St Theresa the stigmatist from Germany. Loving thoughts.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 4 months ago from The Caribbean

      Wasn't aware that this poet wrote so many poems. His "speechlessness" and "helplessness" in his efforts to define love, give it the absoluteness it deserves. I appreciate your commentary.

    • manatita44 profile image
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      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Thank You, Rasma.

      He is the most popular mystic Persian poet in the West. Look at some videos.

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 months ago from Riga, Latvia

      Thank you for the most interesting introduction to Rumi. Enjoyed this.

    • manatita44 profile image
      Author

      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Well, you have enough on your plate, my Dear Alicia.

      Still, you will gain unimaginable solace and inner beauty by looking at the works of the Persian mystics: Rumi and Hafiz, in particular. But also Kabir, Mirabai, Rabia ... todos.

      Thank you so much!!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I have to sadly admit that I know very little about Rumi and his writing. Thank you for creating this interesting article, Manatita. I will explore Rumi's work.

    • manatita44 profile image
      Author

      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Yes indeed Linda. You and I, let us work together. We'll certainly get there. Much Love.

    • manatita44 profile image
      Author

      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Frank,

      You are a star. Thank you so much!

      Nikki,

      My apologies. I thought I wrote to you before everyone else.

      My sweet friend, what you said was very charming and wonderful to hear. Endless gratitude.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 4 months ago from Shelton

      thank you for the inspiration my friend..

    • nikkikhan10 profile image

      Nikki Khan 4 months ago from London

      Where is my Thanks?

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 4 months ago from Washington State, USA

      To attempt to describe Love is to describe Beauty. It is not possible; we do not yet have the words. We will know that language perfectly when we are perfect.

    • manatita44 profile image
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      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Sublime indeed! Thank you so much Bill.

      Eric,

      Thank you so much!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Sublime is a beautiful word, is it not? As is Rumi's poetry...sublime...as is yours. Peace and blessings always!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 4 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Extremely enlightening

    • nikkikhan10 profile image

      Nikki Khan 4 months ago from London

      Hi Manatita,

      I am a huge fan of Rumi and his poetry, amazing poetry which connects you back with your God.The depth of his poetry takes you to another world of divine love where you find yourself very close to your Creator.

      Great job,once again you have proved your outstanding style of writing.

      Many Blessings.

    • manatita44 profile image
      Author

      manatita44 4 months ago from london

      Hello Bro.

      Long time. Good to sèe you and perhaps I'm lacking myself. Thank you so much!

    • emge profile image

      Madan 4 months ago from Abu Dhabi

      Wonderful post Manatita. I first read his poetry in college. Great soul and a fine hub

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