ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

A Writer's Rights and Obligations

Updated on April 30, 2012

The Writer's Rights' Bill is Passed!

Finally complete, the Writer's Bill of Rights soon became lost in the blogosphere, never to be seen again
Finally complete, the Writer's Bill of Rights soon became lost in the blogosphere, never to be seen again | Source

A Writers Rights?


Right!


A writer's rights include the ability to stretch scientific fact (otherwise known as creating science fiction), and to invoke their right to write to the right, to the left, or dead center on the highway of irony, political irony, societal leanings and ironing white shirts with extra starch.

When a writer writes "The submarine held 12 people and dove to 12,000 feet in 120 seconds, with no adverse effects on the divers. But seaman first class Jed Bowman forgot to lock the screen door, allowing the killer octopus entry to the Nimitz class nuclear submarine." most know that this can't be done without using a nuclear class military submarine (not the Newfoundland variety with their danged screen doors) or that the killer octopus doesn't really know how to open a screen door.


Does a writer have the right to write whatever they want?


If they are writing fiction, and what they are writing has been identified from the start as fictional, then their world knows no bounds. But, when writing a newsflash or any type of journalistic venture, the truth and nothing but the truth should be written. Now, we get into things like "who's truth?" and "who exactly found this to be true?".



Writing has it's benefits!

After a full hour's workout on the laptop, Luigi realized that he was shorter, but in much better shape.
After a full hour's workout on the laptop, Luigi realized that he was shorter, but in much better shape. | Source

What's left for writer's rights?

Blog this!


For the blogger, whether recreational, professional or amateur, whatever they write does not have to have a bearing on reality, and no blogs should be taken as scientific fact. Unless, of course, they implicitly state that what they are presenting is scientific fact.

Blogging in and of itself is not journalism, per se, nor is it really "writing", in the overall sense of the word; it is just putting your thoughts down on paper (well, on a laptop, tablet, smartphone or on one of those historic relics, the desktop computer).

Should bloggers be held to the same standards that journalists are held to?


If so, then perhaps 75% or more of current bloggers writing daily or weekly posts would have to give up their right to write, right? Well, if someone were to write that they had pancakes for breakfast, and it was proven that they actually ate at McDonald's, could they be held accountable? Should they be? What's the difference between lying about what you had for breakfast, and what is going to happen when a 100-Kilometer wide asteroid comes plummeting around Earth early next year? One seems to dictate that the writer believes that people care what they eat, and the latter seems to dictate a rather doomsday-type of scenario. If that asteroid actually hits the Earth, it will be more than 10x more powerful than both nuclear bombs dropped on Japan in WWll.




The reason for more deaths than the black plague

Follow my religion or fall to my sword!
Follow my religion or fall to my sword! | Source


At what point does a blog writer need to explain to their audience that what they are writing is fiction?

When writing about religious beliefs, does a writer need to explain the branch of the religion that they belong to, so that the reader has the choice to either read along or move along? People talk about Afghani religious zealots a lot lately, but they fail to remember that their religion is just as old as Christianity and based on similar events? The real problem is that religious people believe that everyone should have the same religious beliefs that they do, and no religion is worst at this than the Christians.

WWJD?

The WWJD acronym is well known the world over, and you don't have to be christian to know what it means. Same goes with Alahu Akbar! Mind you, WWJD is not the last thing hundreds of thousands of people have as the last words they hear in their lives.

So, what is a writer's responsibility to declare their intentions for what they are writing about?

None.

That's right, a writer does not need to explain that they are writing pro or con with regards to religion; if their audience doesn't like what they're reading, they will just stop reading that post and hopefully come back for the next post anyways. The far-right wing religiously fanatic, those who preach that their religion is the only true religion and all others are wrong and their followers nothing less than brainwashed do not have to declare so at the beginning of their blog post, and neither does an atheist when they question the existence of a God who created the Earth 7,000 years ago, and left the dinosaur bones lying around to confound us. Really? Oh, come on! If you believe this but don't believe in alien abductions then I have some waterfront property in Florida for sale, real cheap!

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Marc Babineau profile image
      Author

      Marc Babineau 5 years ago from Cornwall, Ontario, The Seaway City

      Thanks for dropping by, Christy! Yes, i've been letting my "free" writing falter, too many paid assignments at the moment (through Constant Content, for an Aerospace firm in Toronto)

    • Marc Babineau profile image
      Author

      Marc Babineau 5 years ago from Cornwall, Ontario, The Seaway City

      Thanks for dropping by, Tobey! Glad you agree!

    • tobey100 profile image

      tobey100 5 years ago from Whites Creek, Tennessee

      AMEN!

    • ChristyWrites profile image

      Christy Birmingham 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      You are quite right that the blogger has a more relaxed style of writing than say a newspaper journalist. Good topic! Nice to see you writing a hub, keep em coming :)

    Click to Rate This Article