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Accenting Southern: A Comfortable Heritage

Updated on June 28, 2016
RTalloni profile image

Robertatalloni means creativity. Whether in writing or in more typical art forms artistry (and a bit of fun) must be part of the work.

Seasons of the South: Accenting a Heritage
Seasons of the South: Accenting a Heritage | Source

There's a Comfortable Heritage Behind Southern Kindness


While I have never lived anywhere but the South, I don’t particularly think of myself as a Southerner. I actually see myself as a human American woman, blessed to live in this day and time in this nation with so much opportunity and knowledge available to me.

However, I am Southern, “just because,” and I have come to suspect that true Southern is about as good as it gets on the earthly level, for being Southern is to be comfortably kind.

Southern ways, Southern accents, Southern sayins', Southern thinkin’, it’s all about being comfortable. Comfortable with others and comfortable with self. Comfortable enough to honestly share wisdom, comfortable enough to be nice in the face of downright meanness.

Comfortable enough to not feel threatened by differences, comfortable enough to be strong if need be. Comfortable enough not to let what others think worry me as long I as I am doing what is right.


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Southern HeritageSouthern TreasuresSouthern FlowersSouthern BloomsSouthern  Skies
Southern Heritage
Southern Heritage | Source
Southern Treasures
Southern Treasures | Source
Southern Flowers
Southern Flowers | Source
Southern Blooms
Southern Blooms | Source
Southern  Skies
Southern Skies | Source

A Comfortable Heritage Means Southerners can be Kind even when Things Get Hot


Most Southern stereotypes follow the pattern of all stereotypes, but folks is folks, all in their own way everywhere. I learned that my newest wonderful daughter-in-law seems to truly enjoy hearing Southern adages when she mentioned feeling badly that a friend who had done her best had received some unfair criticism.

I told my new daughter that her friend could simply, yet with the utmost kindness, tell those who were critical that they could get happy in the same drawers they got sad in. To my surprise she was amazed at that old saying’s simple truth and I’m glad she has not forgotten it.

It isn’t just the black words on this white paper that are important. Indeed, it is most often the kindness with which such appropriate words are said that makes them suitably funny as well as apropos. The truth of “you may be sorry that you went, sorry that you stayed, sorry that you spoke, but you’ll never be sorry you were kind” is what lets us put our heads down on our pillows in peace at night even when we commit a royal faux pas.

Kindness Leaves Us Comfortable
Kindness Leaves Us Comfortable | Source

Nosey questions leave some people in a quandary, but a true southerner knows that an innocently honest and very exceptionally kind “What possible use could that information be to you?” will stop them in their tracks every time.

With comfortable sayings and practiced kindness we don’t have to waste time developing multi-level communication skills, or use technology to set up boundaries that shut people out.

We are good to go for communicating on non-nosey levels, and mercy, who knows what we might learn if we take the time to have a conversation with those who do ask nosey questions!

While kindness is the standard that lets accomplished southerners move through life with a comfortable grace and strength that either amazes the rest of the world or goes right over their pea-pickin’ heads, there are times when righteous indignation is called for and this, too, is a Southerner’s forte.

When my good-as-gold friend was mugged I was mad enough to chew up nails and spit out barbed wire. When someone tried to rob my son’s truck right in our own backyard I chased them off in a way that scared them silly because you can mess with a lot of things but you just can’t mess with one of Mama’s babies--or his stuff.

The protection of the innocent is always a primary concern, yet, if I am personally offended, I’ll try to let it roll off me like water off a duck’s back. A kind reply, even if there's an underlying message for the offender, is comfortable. Life’s too short to waste time worrying about the addlebrained.


A Comfortable Heritage Allows Southerners to be Kind Come What May


I like my new daughter’s particular ways of speaking. It’s fun to learn her colloquialisms and inflections, and besides that, love makes all her ways endearing to me.

New and different to my ears but reflecting the values that decent, honest people with character hold dear, I embrace her words and ways. Neither of us gives up our own yet we respect and enjoy each other’s while happily picking up some new phrases to incorporate into our own.

When the time comes I’m going to tell her the same thing my husband told me when I was weary with my first pregnancy, “Well, Hon, it’s like a long-tailed cat in a room full a’ rockin’ chairs, it won’t be as long as it has been.

Then we’ll tell her about names in the South. “Jasmine Leigh” might have close relatives with excruciatingly similar names, which is not toooooo complicated once you understand that full names are often used.

A Southern Accent to make You Smile :)

“Jasmine Leigh Georgiana Morgan give your cousin Jasmine Lee Savannah Morgan her parasol right back to her! You know her skin’s as delicate as Aunt Jasmine Lea Dixie Morgan’s is. What HAS come over you child?!”

While true southern children know what inflections go with their names, and so, do not get confused by all the name calling, “child” is always a kind compliment since most of these Jasmines could be 30 something.


Did you learn anything new about Southerners from this hub?

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Sweeping it all Under the Rug...


Well, all that is to say, if you’re waiting on real southerners to start worrying about whether we sound backwards to your ears or sophisticated enough to suit you, yer backin’ up, bless yore heart. You might consider taking some advice from the politically correct nouveau riche and extend some good, old-fashioned tolerance.

Whether you do or don't is no matter, though. You have a better chance at making it snow in July here in the South than you have at provoking me to respond in an unkind manner. After all, you wear drawers, too, and you can get happy in the same ones you got sad in. The simple fact is that everyone puts their britches on feet first. Being comfortably Southern is not to worry about it.


Fun with Learning Southern Speak


• Explore The South's history state by state.

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Southern Snow, Southern Excitement

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    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 17 months ago from the short journey

      Shyron E Shenko:

      Your grandmother's mix up of the names is just delightful. She must have been a great lady, and thinking of all her children and grands at once is certainly excusable! Thank you very much for taking the time to read this hub and for adding your comment.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 17 months ago from the short journey

      pstraubie48:

      Your Mayberry must be a lovely place! Your "writing a book?" reply is a pretty good one. :) Thanks most kindly for stopping in and then letting me know you enjoyed this accent on being Southern!

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 17 months ago from Texas

      Southern Comfort with a twist over (n)ice or straight up good for your soul. (I Just made this one up) especially for your gracious beautiful article.

      You have awakened memories of my childhood in Alabama and my Mammaw who was the kindest person who ever lived, when she would call me Child or Sirene (she would start to say Shyron but I reminded her of her daughter Irene = Shyron/Irene = Sirene.

      I enjoyed this very much.

      Blessings and hugs from Texas.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 17 months ago from sunny Florida

      Comfortable....yes m'am...that certainly covers it. In the little town in which I reside is a tiny town. On more than one occasion I have said that I live in Mayberry. I definitely feel comfortable here for so many reasons.

      I am a Southern woman who is comfortable in her own skin but being Southern does not define who I am. I am first and foremost an American woman who was raised in a family that bleeds red white and blue.

      The nosey question portion of this is so spot on. There are times when I have been asked those questions about my own personal business or about someone else and I have replied (while smiling, to take the edge off) Are you writing a book? If so leave that chapter out.

      Well done. shared

      Angels are on the way to you this evening. ps

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      sgbrown:

      Southern kindnesses can indeed sometimes leave a recipient wondering what just happened...but I try not to be too exercised in the innuendo that the heritage can infuse into relationships. :) In other words, "Stay calm, promote good" is a great motto for one and all to strive to live by!

      This hub was one of my earliest and most fun to write. Thanks much for stopping in to check it out and for letting me know you enjoyed the visit!

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 2 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      As far as I know, Oklahoma is considered a "southern" state. I consider myself to be a "southern girl" and am very proud of it! I love the old sayings and use many of them often. They get right to the point with out beating around the bush and do so with kindness and caring, most of the time! I love your hub!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      MDavisatTIERS:

      Thanks much for visiting this hub and for sharing your experience. The respect shown in the south when anyone says sir or ma'am to another person is often misunderstood by those who are not familiar with the custom. It's amazing that even kindness can be misunderstood in such situations!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      pstraubie48:

      Thanks kindly! So appreciate that you let me know how much you enjoyed this post. It's the sort of post that was just plain fun to write and continues to be fun to hear about from readers.

    • MDavisatTIERS profile image

      Marilyn L Davis 2 years ago from Georgia

      Good morning, RTalloni; well done. Transplanted from Indiana to Tennessee when I was nine was my first introduction to "Ma'am" and "Sir" as responses. I was not a rude child, but didn't qualify with these two words. I learned quickly. At 67, I still say, "Ma'am" in a questioning tone when I don't understand. Up north, I have to explain my question before a response...down here in Georgia, no one is confused.

      Manners are as much "a part of raising" as learning our A-B-C's in the south. Being kind is just good manners. ~Marilyn

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Awesome awesome and, can I just say, awesome, Rtalloni

      Comfortable is clearly a defining term for all things Southern. I grew up in the South and like you I am firstt and foremost an American woman....having been raised to love and cherish this land.

      But I am too a Southern woman ..I have lived in many places outside of the South. And after all is said and done, this is where I have reurned. There is something unique and wonderful about living in a part of world where your neighbor is neighborly in every sense of the word.

      Voted up++++ shared and here is a big....yahoooooo!!!!

      Angels are once again finding their way to you this morning ps

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      techygran:

      Thanks very much. This early hub seems to be one readers continue to enjoy and is still a favorite of my own from a writer's perspective.

      Sorry you've mostly learned about southerners from how they are (mis)represented by media. However, it is true, folks is folks everywhere, and we have very fond memories of the people we encountered in Canada. It was when we crossed back into the USA that people in those border states disdained and mocked our accents.

      I wish I could've told them that I enjoyed hearing theirs and that they should enjoy hearing ours, but their closed minds wouldn't allow for such a conversation. I'm certain that not all in those states feel that way, but it was a contrast to the people in Canada! We do need to get out and visit with each other for the truth is, we generally have more in common than not. So appreciate your addition to this discussion! :)

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Hi again Roberta, I enjoyed reading this hub-- my Southern exposure is pretty much restricted to Tennessee Williams, William Faulkner, "To Kill A Mockingbird", Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, Dolly Parton, et al, and dates me, I know. I enjoyed "Designing Women" back in the day on TV. I have been to Florida and have a friend who moved home to Georgia. I liked your exploration of "kindness" as one of the important virtues of the South. If I didn't get out and off the Internet I might begin to think that it was a rare occurrence everywhere, but the truth is that I come across many kindnesses among my friends and family even up here among us frosty, taciturn Canadians. I guess "folks is folks everywhere", eh? ~Cynthia

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      pstraubie48:

      Thanks very much! This is one of my first hubs and readers still seem to enjoy it. It was fun to think through the topic and write this one. I probably need to review and upgrade it, but it makes me smile when I read it and I forget to attend to business with it. Soon though… :)

      By the way, if you want to use the quote in a truly Southern way, panties would not be used--too uncomfortably personal--it would be pants for the finest in Southernese. Now that I think about it though, I wonder if in Texas they say '...get happy in the same jeans you got sad in'. ;)

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      This is so well done, RTalloni. I m Southern but I am an American first...

      However like you there is something uniquely special about being Southern and the whole way we live. It is all about comfort just as you say...not primarily our own comfort but extending kindness and care to others to insure their comfort.

      I have to use the 'get happy in the same panties you got sad in'

      quote love that It says it all!!

      Have you read Shellie Rushing Tomlinson's book, Suck Your Stomach & Put Some Color on! It is everything Southern girls need to know and that Mommas volunteer freely .

      Have a lovely day

      Angels are on the way to you ps

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      moonlake:

      Forgiving her because she has other qualities that make her your friend is a true indication of your southernness! :) And, how wise of you to let them finish before announcing that you are from Arkansas…bravo! :) Indeed they should hang their heads!

      Thanks so much for checking this out again and for all your feedback. Writing this hub was fun work and the comments continue to be interesting!

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      Sadly to say my friend doesn't admire southern accents she is actually making fun of me. I forgive her because she has many other qualities.

      I have been in my quilting class and listened to women make fun of southerners. When they’re finished I tell them I'm from Arkansas they hang their heads very fast and they should.

      I came back to this hub so I could pin it.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      anidae:

      Thanks kindly for your feedback on this hub. :) It was one of my very first and still is one of my own favs. The comments continue to amaze me and when new ones come in I think that I need to write another like this one, but finding a topic that compares to southern stuff and such isn't easy… :)

    • anidae profile image

      Anita Adams 4 years ago from Tennessee

      Way to go RTalloni !!!! You explained our southern heritage so elloquently. We are kind and loving ---until we get riled---but riled in a polite way. And definitely don't mess with our babies--no matter what age they are. I loved this article !!! It is awesome and beautiful and true.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      phdast7:

      Thanks much for letting me know that you enjoyed it that much! :)

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      This really is a marvelous hub. So worth a second read. :) Blessings. Theresa

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      rebeccamealey:

      You are so kind--thanks bunches for your visit and feedback!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      This was a lot fun to read. I enjoyed it. Being Southern, of course helped! Charming and full of wonderful wit....aahhh. well, I just inadvertently described a genteel southern lady. I'll bet that is you!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Jackie Lynnley:

      Thank you for letting me know you enjoyed this read!

      If we don't watch out for our babies, who will? And Southerners know how to do that just right. ;)

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Gcrhoads64:

      Sometimes that's the only answer!

      Thanks much for stopping in and taking the time to leave a note.

    • Gcrhoads64 profile image

      Gable Rhoads 4 years ago from North Dakota

      While living in NC, I learned a charming phrase that always shuts people up. When people make a suggestion on how I should raise my autistic child, I look right right at them and say, "That's your advice? Well, bless your heart." :)

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Kathleen Cochran:

      "as fast as I could" makes me smile 'cause I love livin' South. :) And how sweet that you were able to comfort a cadet from back home with some simple conversation--that makes me smile, too!

      A "few well-selected words" continues to be an ability to strive for, something writers need to work to achieve every day. Yet, some days, it comes easier than others, yes? :) Your comment reminds me of how oppressed peoples have learned to communicate wisely throughout history.

      Christians used a simple fish symbol, slaves used religious spirituals to speak paths to earthly freedom, Navajos stumped the best code breakers, cryptanalysis broke the Enigma code, and imagine what goes on with today's technology.

      I am so sorry for your loss and wish you the best in the days and weeks that follow the loss of a loved one. It is humbling to know that that this hub touched tender strings in your heart at this time. Thank you for your visit and for taking the time to leave your note.

    • Kathleen Cochran profile image

      Kathleen Cochran 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      I was born in Kansas, but I got to Georgia as fast as I could, so I consider myself a native. Over the years I haven't received comments so much for how I sound as for the things I say without ever giving it a second thought. I used to call my husband-to-be at West Point and more than once the cadet who answered asked if he could just talk to me for a minute because I sounded like back home. A good friend from California used to call me when we were neighbors in Germany, and when I answered in a thick drawl she'd ask, "Have you just been talking to your Mother again?" So much of what we say can be directly traced back to the rich influence of our Black friends who don't get nearly the credit they deserve for their ability to communicate volumes of wisdom in only a few well-selected words. Thanks for this walk down memory lane. My mother recently passed away and I hear her voice in your hub.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Thanks for all the smiles. I share your temper over loved ones and their stuff, lol. There really is no place like the south to me and I don't long to go anywhere else! ^

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Deborah-Diane:

      Thanks bunches! Some say, "Southern is about as good as it gets!" Though I generally promote the idea of everyone supporting their own home (family, city, region, nation) because a strong foundation with a respect for our individualities strengthens us to work together for important causes, I do understand that old saying. :)

    • Deborah-Diane profile image

      Deborah-Diane 4 years ago from Orange County, California

      Delightful article. We lived for 25 years in Texas and I came to really enjoy Southern women. I also still love to read Southern Living Magazine.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      KoffeeKlatch Gals:

      Thanks for letting me know that you enjoyed this piece! Writing southern stuff and such can be a lot of fun. :)

      If a person needs putting in their place, it is possible for a southerner to do it with style. :) Appreciate your visit very much!

    • KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

      Susan Haze 4 years ago from Sunny Florida

      I love this hub. My family has all been raised in the south. Another thing a southerner can do is put you in your place in the most polite way.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Thanks bunches, Derdriu, for letting me know how much you enjoyed this piece. :) It was written in my first days with HP, but the slice-of-life approach still seems to delight readers.

    • profile image

      Derdriu 4 years ago

      RT, All Virginia is shaking -- and smiling -- from my amiable, appreciative, joyous laughter from reading what you've written. One of my favorite answers is "What possible use...", and one of my favorite sayings is the option of being glad or sad in one and the same drawers!

      Shared.

      Respectfully, Derdriu

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      slackermom:

      Thanks much. This was a fun hub for a writing exercise! :)

      "…time spent being nasty is time truly wasted" is so full of meaning. That quote has depths and widths that we do not fathom.

      Thanks again, southern friend. :)

    • slackermom profile image

      Lisa Palmer 5 years ago from Attapulgus GA

      Wonderful hub. I am a Georgia girl born and raised. I am often kinder to others than they are to me but I never regret being respectful to them because I think time spent being nasty is time truly wasted. I really enjoyed your hub. Great job.

      Southern Girls Rule!!!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      mary615:

      Good for you! It would be a shame to live anywhere and not be proud of it, not make the most of the heritage one is given, yet it is so important for all of us to respect people no matter where they are from.

      I find that a southern accent is even more effective when diction is perfect--that really sets off the teasers! :)

      Thanks so much for your visit and feedback!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      Happyboomernurse:

      Thanks very much for your visit and generous compliment!

      I'm glad to know you enjoyed your Carolina visits. The old sayings can really make a visit as well as a life here. :)

      Just when I thought I would be doing more nature photography doing so was put on hold, but I hope to take real advantage of this area with my camera next year. Glad you enjoyed these flower photos. :)

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 5 years ago from Florida

      Well, I'm about as southern as you can get! I came to Florida in 1965, and I still talk the same way I did as when I lived in Georgia. I get teased a lot, but I don't care: I'm proud to be southern!

      Great Hub. I voted UP etc.

    • Happyboomernurse profile image

      Gail Sobotkin 5 years ago from South Carolina

      This hub is a masterpiece of southern style and hospitality and I'm rating it up across the board including funny, because the image of a southern lady chasing off her son's would be robbers made me chuckle.

      Though I was born in the north and have spent the greater part of my life in NY and NJ, I've been blessed to spend many vacations in North and South Carolina and I absolutely adore southern hospitality, kindness, accents and the very descriptive sayings that are actually fun to figure out when one first hears them.

      I love what you said in this quote: “You may be sorry that you went, sorry that you stayed, sorry that you spoke, but you’ll never be sorry you were kind”

      How very true.

      Sending a Bouquet of Hub Hugs Your Way,

      Gail

      BTW: I love your nature photography, which was another thing that made this hub so special.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      he, he, he, he... "Thankya' now" for stopping in again!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      Fiddleman:

      Indeed, the southern accent is as varied as the people who use it...and that scope and scale is fairly vast. Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed this read!

    • jessefutch profile image

      jessefutch 5 years ago from North Carolina

      I imply that Southerners are kinder than the rest! Anyone who has ever driven through rush hour traffic up North can attest to this!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      rajan jolly:

      I did not mean to imply that Southerners "are kinder than the rest," just that many people here have a special way of benefitting from expressing kindness. Reality is that there are all kinds of folks everywhere. :)

      Thanks very much for checking out this southern piece and for all of your feedback.

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      Fiddleman 5 years ago

      Great hub and no one can win a heart like a Southern Belle. I have never traveled much but I have learned the "southern" accent may differ from one area or state to another and even in the same state such as Virginia and Georgia and even here in WNC. Great fun read!

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 5 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      RT, I gather then that Southners are kinder than the rest. Thank you. voted and sharing.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      lindacee:

      Thanks bunches for stopping in and leaving your comment that comes from experience. :)

      Polite to a fault…yep, sometimes.

    • lindacee profile image

      lindacee 5 years ago from Arizona

      Great Hub! I lived in the South for 20+ years (Louisiana, Texas and Georgia) and most of what you write rings true to me. I learned to say "yes ma'am" and "no sir" and referred to our friends' parents as Miss (Miz) or Mr. followed by their first name as a sign of respect. For the most part, Southerners are polite to a fault.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      jessefutch:

      Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed this hub from a Southerner. South Westerners and South Easterners are not just alike, but there are plenty of similarities. We would like to thoroughly visit Texas one day. :)

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      moonlake:

      How fun that your friend admires your southern accent. All she needs is to live here "a while" and she'll do a better job of it. :)

      Thanks much for letting me know you enjoyed this hub and for leaving your comment!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      Peggy W:

      Thanks much for letting me know you once again enjoyed this look at being southern. You are very kind to highlight this slice-of-life piece for me!

    • jessefutch profile image

      jessefutch 5 years ago from North Carolina

      I'm from Texas originally, but have lived in North Carolina with my wife most of my life. She is from NC. It's interesting that in Texas there are a lot of Cowboy sayings, "Thankya now, ya'll come see us again", while my wife's NC sayings are just downright from the hills, "Whatcha lookin' mama? I ain't seen that thang in an age!" or my favorite "One mo gain" (one moe genn, i.e. "do it again"). I adore Southerners, from their courtesy "yes ma'am" and boy you'd better open a door for a lady or an elder, to their loud voice when you mess with someones's baby, belonging, Mama, Daddy and so on. People come down South to find true love, beautiful women and higher education. What's not to love?

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 5 years ago from America

      I have a friend that always tries to copy what little southern accent I have left. I told her the other day she has the worst southern accent I have ever heard.

      I'm sorry I have lost so much of my accent. I love the way southerners always use both names.

      I like the comment “What possible use could that information be to you?”

      Enjoyed your hub.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Came back and read this again. I was unfamiliar with some of your sayings and this time I think I'll tweet and share with HP followers. One cannot have too much Southern kindness aimed their way! :)

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      rebeccamealey:

      So glad you enjoyed this hub on being comfortably Southern.

      Folks is folks the world over and it is interesting to learn about different ways of living out life.

      Thanks much for coming by!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 5 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      I loved reading this. I too have never lived anywhere but the south. But upon visiting NYC most people were in a hurry and a bit rude by my standards! Great Hub!

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      phdast7:

      Such a kind compliment! :)

      Welcome to being Southern! Isn't it a marvelous thing that you have a double-southern heritage that solidly incorporates both Polish and Greek roots from your youth all bound together with the bravado of the Air Force to keep you on track with it all? That's Southern with panache! :)

      Thank you for your input and the sharing. I need to take the leap and get my eggs out of one basket so I can do that for other's work--yours is important.

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Well, this was just wonderful. I had a thoroughly good time reading your lovely and so very "Southern" essay and the flowers are just gorgeous! :)

      Although, I have lived in Georgia for 30 years now and most of my family is here, I have never really identified myself as southern. I was born in Texas and my father was Air Force (and broken English, just got ff the boat Polish as well) so I was a military brat and lived all over the place during my formative growing up years, including three wonderful years in Athens, Greece.

      So, I don't have a southern accent and I guess over the years I have most strongly identified with military bases, families, locations! :) And no one ever quite put "southern-ness" in the frame work that you did. From now on I am comfortably, kindly Southern. :) SHARING

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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      Thank you very much, annart. Your comment on helping others think reminds me that doing so is one of the great services we can offer each other, isn't it?!

      Bravo for your southern heritage! I'll have to find a video that will let me hear the accent of southern Englanders so I can learn to recognize it. My family loves hearing accents from all over the world.

      With a long history of skillful use of the language English people could put American southerners to shame at times, I'm sure. Thinking of some fabulous quotes from England's sons and daughters makes me quite certain of that fact!

      Keeping in mind the value of each helps make us friends. Your visit and input are most kind, and gratefully received! :)

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      Ann Carr 5 years ago from SW England

      Great hub with beautiful sentiments. A quiet kind carefully phrased comment has much more effect than an obvious reprimand not least because it makes people think! I am a southerner, but of England! I'd like to be as kind and generous of spirit as you. Voted up, interesting, useful and beautiful. Thanks

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      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      hush4444:

      Well child, you have certainly granted me quite a compliment. Thank you kindly. :)

      Those SC phrases and accents can be something else. It's amazing to experience and learn them, as with others the world over. It's been fun to refine my own southern accent under the tutelage of western Carolinians.

      Tell your bubba that it's cold in the Carolina's tonight and he should enjoy his evening in Hawaii for the rest of us!

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      hush4444 5 years ago from Hawaii

      What a phenomenal hub! I'm married to a bubba from South Carolina and his idioms crack me up on a daily basis. You portrayed the gentility and strength of the South so very well - I'm glad to have found your hubs!

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      RTalloni 6 years ago from the short journey

      I do appreciate your visits! Looking forward to checking out more of your work.

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      Mary Strain 6 years ago from The Shire

      LoL!

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      RTalloni 6 years ago from the short journey

      Too, too funny. But I would surely hate to be around someone "just popping off a few shots." Hopefully, the guy you were listening to was just using that phrase and he actually did know how to use his gun. BTW, more than one stupid robber has been killed because he went back to rob the same place twice.

      So, your jury story reminds me of my husband's. Right after we moved to these frigid Carolinas from toasty Orlando my husband was called to jury duty in the country county we lived in at the time. Their accents were so thick I had trouble understanding them--another story though. :)

      Anyway, one lawyer was badgering a witness. He thought the witness was simple, but he evidently did not know much about country wisdom. After some exchanges between the two, the examination ended like this: "Mr. --, you say you saw --, but how well can you really see?" Witness loudly and firmly replies, "Well, I can see the moon. How far is that?"

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      Mary Strain 6 years ago from The Shire

      LOL! It reminds me of the jury duty I did a week ago. One of the jurors confessed under questioning that he had been the victim of a robbery. He said the guy came into his yard in broad daylight and started breaking into his truck. He said he chased the guy off and went back inside, assuming the man was gone for good. But no...the guy *turned right around and came back.* He just picked up where he left off. The guy said it made him so mad he grabbed his gun and popped off a few shots, but missed. He said the local police told him he should've just killed the guy, that they wouldn't have made trouble for him, and were making fun of him because he missed (you'd have to live in this section to fully appreciate this -- I don't know whether to feel safe or terrified).

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      RTalloni 6 years ago from the short journey

      Hi mollymeadows:

      Thanks much for coming by to read my work. You're the first to ask about that incident. It's a story in itself. Here's the short version. I had no shotgun handy, no other true weapon, either--lucky for them.

      I happened to be sitting in my husband's Land Cruiser finishing a phone call when I noticed movement behind my vehicle. It's large enough that the guy on foot did not see me parked in the driver's seat. We park at the end of our driveway behind our house so I was doubly hidden.

      When I realized he was headed for my son's truck I started untangling myself from the seatbelt, the phone, and my shoulder bag. As I opened the door to jump out he saw me and turned back down the driveway waving for his cohort to get the car moving.

      Unfortunately, my Merrill clogs weren't secure enough to stay on my feet amid all the bedlam and I lost one of them under the vehicle, which meant I could not run fast enough to tackle him. I did stupidly yell at him, "Hey, hey! What do you want?" Like I didn't know.

      All I could do then was grab a rock and throw it at him, which missed entirely, although he did duck. I was really mad because by then he was running through my front flowerbeds trying to catch his ride. Being mad didn't do me any good though, because although I'm not a bad shot with a firearm, I'm a plain-pitiful ball player.

      I got a good description of the car they were in and left the matter with the police to deal with, but I'm still disgusted with myself... :)

      All this in broad daylight in my own backyard! The nerve...

      Rest well--thanks to the fact that I was a bumbler they lived to rob again.

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      Mary Strain 6 years ago from The Shire

      Just out of curiousity...how did you chase off those triflin' no-counts that messed with your boy's truck? I'm seeing a shotgun... ;-)

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      RTalloni 6 years ago from the short journey

      So glad you have such good memories, N T T! And that you enjoyed this hub.

      Thanks bunches for stopping in and sharing this with us. . :)

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      NotTooTall 6 years ago from The Land of Pleasant Living

      Hi RTalloni,

      Truely enjoyed this Hub. All of my mother's side are from the South. I loved to visit them North Carolina, Kansas and Missouri. Mom would pick a different sibling each summer and I'd go for about a month to stay.

      Whew ~ I thought Maryland got hot in the summer!

      I learned to ride horses (and cows), feed chickens and run from goats and bulls. First time I ever got up at 6 a.m. First time I ever ate squirrel and hares, and cracked a back tooth on shot!

      I picked up a bunch of great sayings that I still say to this day.

      Thanks for reminding me of those prescious times! :)

      N T T

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      RTalloni 6 years ago from the short journey

      Aficionada:

      So appreciate that you came by for a visit!

      Since moving "north" to the cold country of the Carolinas from warm, toasty Florida, I've been able to fine tune my southern accent for use on special occasions. It's a lot of fun to use that melodic sound and watch people's faces--but that may be a southern secret I'm not supposed to tell.

      If people only knew, we're all more alike than we realize!

      Thanks for sharing your story. :)

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      Aficionada 6 years ago from Indiana, USA

      Great Hub, and I can't wait to read more!

      I got a chuckle from the comment by itakins and your response (re Irish accents). A couple of years ago, when I was listening to the radio in the car, I had trouble identifying a particular speaker's accent. It sounded southern, but I couldn't identify from where in the South - some of the sounds were just a bit "different." When the speaker was identified, I was surprised to learn that he was Irish! I think it was the overall melody of the speech and the oo ("you") sound especially that sounded so much like a southern accent. But it really isn't that surprising, since so many from Ireland and Scotland settled in areas of the South a couple hundred years ago.

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      RTalloni 7 years ago from the short journey

      Here's another idiom for you, Petra...it's a jungle out there!

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      Petra Vlah 7 years ago from Los Angeles

      I am afraid I am too late to stop you, so just enjoy it

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      RTalloni 7 years ago from the short journey

      So glad you enjoyed this! Thanks for stopping in and commenting. Looking forward to more of your work, Petra.

      Now I'm on my way out to this southern heat to trim my shrubs... say something to stop me! ;-)

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      Petra Vlah 7 years ago from Los Angeles

      This is a great way to re-discover the South I have visited some years ago and loved it. Saying it as it is, but in a polite and non aggressive way is what I liked best. Now I know why I always liked you RT

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      RTalloni 7 years ago from the short journey

      How we love Irish accents! Actually, we love all the accents of the world! Seems like answering a question with "why do you ask" could be a very wise thing! Thanks bunches for stopping by to read my hubs!

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      itakins 7 years ago from Irl

      I pick up some similiarities with Ireland here,we often answer a question with a question,such as ,'why do you ask'? and we address people as 'child' affectionately.

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      RTalloni 8 years ago from the short journey

      Oh, I should have been more fair to librarians! How easily a few can make a whole look bad...MOST librarians do not act as if the children should be banned from the library. Maybe it is their large personalities AND their mystery...one never knows what a child is thinking, what he or she may do next. Isn't it a wonderful adventure---most of the time? ;) So worth it, though, all of the time!

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      Merriweather 8 years ago

      We're lucky in that our public library is very child-friendly. Still, though, I do get looks there with my crew. Come to think of it, maybe it isn't the number, but the large personalities? :)

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      RTalloni 8 years ago from the short journey

      One of the most unusual situations in which nosey questions are asked is at the library. It is absolutely funny when a librarian acts as if a mother has too many children. Who does he/she think will come to the library in 20 years if children are not born into families that will take them to the library? I always wonder if these people are secret book misers, wanting to keep their books dusted and neatly arranged, in a perpetually undisturbed state. Glad to follow your dialog on this topic. Thanks!

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      Merriweather 8 years ago

      So true -- I'm a Southerner by birth and upbringing and have, on more than one occasion, answered a question with, "Why do you ask?"

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      RTalloni 8 years ago from the short journey

      Thank you! I am new to hubbing...much to learn. Thanks for the encouragement! Looking forward to reading yours now that I have your link!

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Loved this! Although I was born up north, I have lived most of my life in the south. I am still smiling after reading this hub!