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An Arrogant Editor

Updated on June 15, 2012

The Writer and The Editor

Once there was a writer, among many other writers, his wisdom and rebellious nature made him stand out. The writer used to work for an institution and wrote several content for learners. The material was published in the institutional books in form of poetry, prose, science and everything else. The instituition publishing department had an editor. This man thought himself as God, just like a barber would think he's bigger than the King while trimming his hair. He fueled his vain ego by telling himself thus, "Writers write, they can only do so much. It is I who decides whether to publish their work or not. I judge the writers, I am their God." One day the writers appealed to the Principal of the school, about the incompetence of the editor and how he rejected their writings based on pure impudence. He only wanted to impose his authority, by randomly rejecting even the most brilliant novel. The principal wanted nothing to do with this, so he called forth the editor, in order to settle the dispute. The editor, looking down on the writers, said condescendingly, "Writers write, they can only do so much! I choose who gets published and who not. I judge quality of your writings, I'm your God." The wise writer said in reply, "A writer is like a chef and his writing is food, readers are like the diners waiting to eat the food, food for thought that be too. But an editor is like the intermediate man, the one who brings the food from the kitchen to the dining table, he's merely a butler, a luxury. He gets no praise for the taste of the food neither are his serving skills much appreciated ever. He holds little importance and his name is never forgotten as it is never remembered. It is the writers for whom they exist." The editor resigned realizing how unimportant his existence was and no one ever saw him again.

Moral: Know your role and shut your mouth!


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    • Deep Metaphysical profile imageAUTHOR

      Deep Biswas 

      6 years ago from India

      @ MizBejabbers I know your intent wasn't to be ugly, that's why I approved your comment see! And I also tried to explain myself better, so that there are no misunderstandings. Maybe my representations (e.g writer & editor)were wrong. I just thought that my experience in the office and the "Know your role.." thing would make a match, I guess it didn't.

      I totally agree with you and your advice is indeed valuable. It is always better to get your work checked by someone else. I would change the name of this story as "An arrogant editor", so that I'm clear that it's one guy I'm talking about.

      Thank you again MizBejabbers.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      Doris James-MizBejabbers 

      6 years ago

      Deep, please, my intent wasn't to be ugly, but to let you know that you had misunderstood editors. And one bit of advice. Always let someone else do a final proof of your work before you submit it for publication. The reason is because a writer CANNOT see all his errors. It is just a natural thing. For some reason they blend into the background. That goes for ME, too.

    • Deep Metaphysical profile imageAUTHOR

      Deep Biswas 

      6 years ago from India

      And one more thing, for all the other readers - I am no fable writer, I neither have the intention of insulting editors, that's just silly, isn't it? This was taken from an experience, when I myself was an editor in a content writing company. This is about one egotistic editor, who was also a senior editor. I do not mean to generalize all editors. I DO NOT MEAN TO SAY THAT EDITORS ARE AN "UNDERCLASS". Maybe it came out wrong,I'm sorry!

      I agree with you MizBejabbers, good editors can indeed add the special condiments to enrich the taste of the dish made by the writer.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      Doris James-MizBejabbers 

      6 years ago

      I see what you are trying to do, but I disagree with the way you are going about it. You must understand the role of the editor. He or she takes the document or manuscript that the writer has produced and corrects typographical errors, misspellings, capitalization and grammar. The editor checks references, names, dates, places, etc. for accuracy. In many cases the editor makes suggestions as to how something should be written or rearranged. The editor makes the silk purse out of the sow's ear, writer's ego notwithstanding. Re: Check the acknowledgments page of many best sellers where the author gushes about his editor.

      How really egotistical to say “the writer is like a chef and his writing is food…” If that is so, then it is the editor who adds the salt and pepper and spices and makes it palatable. Sometimes it is like spoiled meat and has to be thrown out.

      The reason I know so much about it is because I am a legal editor. However, my position has no say in what gets published. I used to work for a newspaper, but I still had no say in what appeared in the paper. That was the job of the managing editor or the executive editor. You really need to learn the profession before you attempt to write fables about it or it will sound like a rant.

      You write: “The moral: Know your role and shut your mouth!” We are not a professional underclass, and if others treated us that way, we would not exist. Then crappy writers would be seen for what they are. Even good writers need their work smoothed out. In my profession if an editor finds it necessary to rewrite something, we seek out another editor to edit it for us.

      If you really want help, please seek it, and don’t bite the hand that you expect to feed you.

    • Deep Metaphysical profile imageAUTHOR

      Deep Biswas 

      6 years ago from India

      If you agree that fables should not be taken literally, then why are you finding the editor character so literal? I guess I should've used animal references.

    • profile image

      RichCronin 

      6 years ago from Australia

      I agree with you Deep M, fables are not to be taken literally. On the other hand I agree with lilyfly as well. This does read as if it is written out of personal animosity against a certain editor or publisher. I mean, editors too are a important part of the literary business is it not? But overall a good write, the moral fits the story. I did not find many typos.

    • Deep Metaphysical profile imageAUTHOR

      Deep Biswas 

      6 years ago from India

      It is from an experience Lily, but not a personal one. Many fable's and even parables I've found, to be thus. Hence why not this one. It is not meant to be taken literally, the moral is "know your role and shut your mouth", that is what this is about. You have to be a bit more specific about the typos. Thank you overall, good day Lilyfly.

    • lilyfly profile image

      Lillian K. Staats 

      6 years ago from Wasilla, Alaska

      Well, this seems to be drawn from your own life,and therefore it would not be a fable. If this is the case, publish yourself. No one should have the right to silence your voice. However, if you care about the text,(writing), you must remove the many typos from your text. The reader stumbles across these things as roadblocks to you intended meaning.It is too short,with no one speaking. Also, you intend us to believe that it is the publisher who believes themself God, but you you have labled the Fable Deesop's Fables.

      You have asked for the truth, and, if you have anything to contribute, now would be the time. Free yourself from your own animus, and any animosity, and please Sir, give us a Fable. Thank you, I wish you well, and be well... lily

    • Deep Metaphysical profile imageAUTHOR

      Deep Biswas 

      6 years ago from India

      Uhmm...okay! Thanks buddy.

    • profile image

      dip sarkar 

      6 years ago

      it's awesomome thining... Good.. Keep gong.

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