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Tips for Writers: How to Write a Poem

Updated on July 29, 2016

From Mind to Page

The words in my head go round and round until they become a poem, essay, or story.
The words in my head go round and round until they become a poem, essay, or story. | Source

Begin with an idea or image.

It all begins with an idea, or perhaps, an image. Creativity is shaping words around the idea or image. The idea will eventually become a poem, an essay, a story. I’ll describe how the process works for me. This process may work for you also.

The focus here is mainly on poetry, but these tips can help with any form of writing.

Incubate the idea.

An idea pops up. It might be a topic or it might be no more than a phrase. I begin to write in my head and the idea becomes more concrete. There may be several ideas in my head at one time. At odd moments during the day—when I’m walking, cooking, taking a shower--they pop up and they start to be developed. Finally, the idea demands that I write it down. Which ever idea is shouting loudest is the one I write.

Write your ideas down. Carry a pad and pen with you so when an idea pops into your mind you can make a note of it. Often ideas will come to you at night because that is when the mind is most relaxed. Keep a pad and pen by your bed. If you get an idea as you are falling asleep or when you wake up with a fragment of a dream in your mind, write it down. Do not think you will remember it. You won’t. Don’t try to write in the dark, You won’t be able to read the scribbles the next day. Keep a small flashlight handy or use one of those pens with a built in flashlight. You could also enter the ideas into your smartphone.

I transfer the ideas to a master list. I review the list every now and then. I am always surprised when I see a great idea on the list that I had forgotten. Now the forgotten idea is back in the forefront of my mind and it may end up being the one shouting the loudest.

The image of the words in rattling around in my head being like the ever-changing patterns of a kaleidoscope popped into my head.

A Kaleidoscope of Words

Words rattle around my head like bits of colored glass in a kaleidoscope.
Words rattle around my head like bits of colored glass in a kaleidoscope. | Source

A Kaleidoscope of Words


Words rattle around in my brain

Like the bits of colored glass inside a kaleidoscope.


Shake them up

And they form beautiful patterns.


Shake them again

And they reform,

A totally different pattern

As beautiful as the one before.


With each shake a pattern is lost.

The words demand that I write them down.


The instinct for self preservation.


Let it flow.

As I begin to write, I just let the words flow. I will free associate. What thoughts or images or memories does the original idea bring forth?

All good writing benefits from the use of imagery—simile, metaphor, the connotations of words. Write down the images that come to you.

Now begin to shape the piece. What comes first? What is next? You may be surprised to find that the writing is going in a very different direction than you intended at first. Go with it. Don’t censor; just write.

At one time, poetry was about adherence to strict form--the number of stanzas, the rhyme scheme, the meter. Modern poetry gives the poet much more freedom. My adage is: “It’s a poem if you say it’s a poem.”

Listen to the poem growing in your mind. The poem will tell you if it wants structure or if it wants freedom. It will tell you if it wants rhyme. It will tell you if it wants enjambment (a line that breaks mid-phrase) or end stop (a line that ends at the end of a phrase or sentence).

Generally speaking, I find rhyme works for light verse—poems for children and humorous poems. Free form or a very structured poem, like a sonnet, work better for more serious topics.

What is A Poem?

A poem...unearths buried treasure.
A poem...unearths buried treasure. | Source

What is a poem?


A poem is rhythm,

and meter,

and sound.


A poem is words,

and image,

and metaphor.


A poem is an idea,

a memory,

a unique way of seeing.


The pen in your hand

will become a dowsing rod

that will begin to tremble

as it hovers over the hidden wellspring

that is your creativity.

Your poem is there, just waiting

to bubble up to the surface.


The pen in your hand

will become a hardy shovel

that unearths a buried treasure,

when you follow the treasure map

that is your intuition.

Your poem is there, just waiting—

hidden riches for you to dig up.


Your poem is there, just waiting

for you to share it with the world.


Edit your writing.

So far you have been using right-brain creativity. Now it is time to apply left-brain reasoning. You have to edit. Is the writing clear and well-organized—does it flow from one thought to the next as smooth as water in a stream? Does it begin with a “grabber”—something that makes the reader want to read more? Is the point of view, the tone, and the style consistent? Have you used exactly the right word to express your meaning?

If you are writing a poem, read it aloud. How do the words sound? How does they rhythm feel? Are alliteration (repetition of initial sounds), assonance (repetition of vowel sounds) and consonance (repetition of consonants) working for you or against you? Sometimes, I will find that words are rhyming in a piece where I do not want rhyme—I either remove the rhyme or rewrite the poem using rhyme.

Poems are all about reducing communication to its essence. Often poems will use only sentence fragments for this reason. When you edit a poem, you should look for more economical ways to convey your meaning. You should never use two words where one will do. Look for places where you can use an image instead of explicit words. An image can replace a whole sentence because images have so many associations.

Prose uses full sentences, but the same advice applies. Are you belaboring a point in an essay? Are you explaining too much in a story? Give the reader an opportunity to do a little work. The reader will be more engaged with your writing because of it.

Words! Words! My Precious Words!

Words can flow freely with great force like a waterfall
Words can flow freely with great force like a waterfall | Source

Words Words! My Precious Words!


Words! Words!

My precious words!

I cast them out

like bread upon the waters

in the hopes that a hungry fish

will come to nibble.


Sometimes the words

are like a brook bubbling along;

Like a cresting river

sweeping forward, ever forward;

like a cascading waterfall,

freely flowing with great force.


Sometimes the words

are like a new-born fawn

struggling to unfold his spindly legs;

legs barely strong enough to bear his weight,

but still he stands

and takes a tentative step.


Sometimes the words

are like a string of pearls

knotted one by one on a cord

until the ends, joined together

form a seamless circle

of lustrous illuminating beauty.


Sometimes the words are

dull as tarnished silver.

I must polish them until they glisten

like the fiery white heart of a diamond,

like starlight encased in crystal,

like a lightning bolt captured in a prism. .


I labor to find the right word.

It must have just the right meaning,

just the right connotation,

just the right feeling

to express some subtle emotion,

to create a peerless image.


My words are cast out into the world

like wandering orphans,

seeking a welcoming home.

I share my words,

my precious words;

I hope to feed hungry souls.

The imagery of meaning.

Throughout this essay and with my poems, I have used lots of different images to describe words. This last poem delves into the imagery of meaning.

I used enjambment in this poem to give a feeling of flow.


Comparing Onions and Oranges

A poem can have layers of meaning like an onion.
A poem can have layers of meaning like an onion. | Source

Comparing Onions to Oranges (Enjamed)


Some poems are like onions with

layers and layers of meaning. Peel

back a layer and you find another

layer. Layer after layer.


Some poems are like oranges with

their first layer laid on thick. And,

then the second layer is no more

than a flimsy gauzy membrane.


Onions are sassy, odiferous,

pungently attacking the tongue.

Sauté an onion in oil. Add it to

a sauce, soup, or stew. Watch how

it changes, forfeits its assertiveness,

becomes mellow. Its transformation

subtly flavors everything else in the pot.


Oranges are bright, gaudy; there’s

no mistaking an orange. Bite into

an orange and the sweet juice

squirts into your mouth and dribbles

down your chin. Peel an orange and

fan the segments on a plate. Enjoy

the golden segments one by one.


Onions are introverts, hiding

themselves from view. Onions

whisper, “Tease out my flavor.”


Oranges are extroverts, keeping

no secrets. Oranges boldly

shout, “Here I am.”


Maybe it is better for a poem to be more like an orange than an onion.


Maybe it is sour grapes to think so.

Variations on a theme.

Nothing is random in a poem. Even the placement of a comma is well-thought out. A poem may use enjambment to keep each line with a certain meter .Enjambment is not done randomly either. The word that ends a line in a poem, no matter what form is used, gets extra attention by virtue of that placement. Therefore, the poet must chose the end-line word with care.

As an exercise, I wrote the above poem twice, one with enjambment and once with end-stops. Notice how it changes the feeling of the poem and even its meaning.

I used an end-stop format to give a feeling of no-nonsense directness.


Comparing Onions and Oranges

Some poems are like oranges--there is no mistaking their meaning.
Some poems are like oranges--there is no mistaking their meaning. | Source

Comparing Onions to Oranges (End Stop)


Some poems are like onions.

Peel back a layer.

Find another layer.

Layer after layer.


Some poems are like oranges.

First layer—laid on thick.

Second layer—a thin membrane,

At most.


Onions are sassy on the tongue.

Odiferous and pungent.

Sauté an onion in oil.

Add it to a sauce, soup or stew.

It forfeits its assertiveness.

It becomes mellow.

It subtly flavors everything else in the pot.


Oranges are bright and gaudy.

There’s no mistaking an orange.

Bite into an orange.

Sweet juice squirts into your mouth.

Peel an orange.

Fan the segments on a plate.

Enjoy them one by one.


Onions are introverts.

Onions hide themselves from view.

Onions whisper, “Tease out my flavor.”


Oranges are extroverts.

Oranges are bold and forthright.

Oranges shout, “Here I am.”


Maybe it is better for a poem to be more like an orange than an onion.


Maybe it is sour grapes to think so.

"Writing Down the Bones" is book that you can use to free your creativity.

Please give me your opinion.

Which of the two versions of "Comparing Onions and Oranges" did you like best?

See results

A Guide to Writing Poetry: A short video with some tips to get you started.

If you enjoy poetry...

You might want to take a look at my found poetry blog, News Print Poetry 2012.The discipline of writing a poem a day was very useful to me to improve my poetry writing skills.

© 2014 Catherine Giordano

I'd love to know what you think about this topic or the poems.

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    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Lloyd Allahar: Me too. Sometimes I'm an orange and sometimes I'm an onion. Whichever way my muse drives me. Thanks for your comment.

    • profile image

      Lloyd Allahar 2 years ago

      I write in onion and oranges. What fancy the moment and what the inner self is saying in my mind.Free verse that make sense. I still use poems from my youth to carry me through adulthood. Thanks for all the tips.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Dream On: What a lovely compliment--I inspired you to write a poem. I will definitely check it out.

    • DREAM ON profile image

      DREAM ON 2 years ago

      I read your hub The Tao of Balanced Energy : Exercise for Life. I tried to spin a poem from it. What do you think ?

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Dream On: I probably have around 100 poems. I'm so busy with HubPages that I don't have much time for writing poems any more. Yu can see some of my other poems in other hubs. A poem for Edith Piaf, some poems about bees, some poems on the death penalty (The Hangman's Plea), The Apology Poem, and Embracing My Inner Crone. I also have a hub on Found Poetry.

    • DREAM ON profile image

      DREAM ON 2 years ago

      Your poem was beautiful. How many poems have you written ?

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thank You Dream On. I'm glad you loved my hub on poems. I hope it inspired you to write a poem.

    • DREAM ON profile image

      DREAM ON 2 years ago

      I loved your hub on poems. It makes us all think of different varieties and letting your true voice come through.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thanks, Linda. I'll keep writing if you keep reading.

    • profile image

      Linda 3 years ago

      You have such a gift. I'd like to hear more of your poems.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Dzy: I'm so sorry to hear about your loss. It doesn't matter how many years have passed, it still feels like yesterday. Perhaps writing will help you with your grief. I hope so. It might make you feel like you are talking with your mother again. Write if it helps, but if it makes you feel worse, then don't do the writing. I hope this is helpful to you.

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 3 years ago from Oakley, CA

      You make a good suggestion. It is hard to believe Mom has been gone 16 years come the end of this month (Sept 2014). You would think I should have recovered by now! But, I was an only child; Mom was my best friend...I took her loss very hard...it was sudden and unexpected.

      I will try using your excellent idea!

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thanks pawpa.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      techygran: I corrected the left brain right brain thing. I always appreciate it if someone points out a mistake.

    • Pawpawwrites profile image

      Jim 3 years ago from Kansas

      Congrats on HOTD. Wow, well done.

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      oh whew, thanks Catherine-- I didn't want to come across as too critical, but I knew that you would want to correct your "evergreen" hub if it were incorrect info... great hub!

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      I will check that out. I attended a lecture recently and the speaker gave that information. Maybe he was wrong or maybe I remembered it wrong. Truth be told, I can never get the left brain right brain thing straight. Thanks for helping me out.

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Beautiful! Congratulations on your HOTD!

      I would just like to point out that it is the "left side of the brain" that is attributed with verbal, logical, and analytical thinking. It excels in naming and categorizing things, symbolic abstraction, speech, reading, writing, arithmetic. The left brain is very linear: it places things in sequential order -- first things first and then second things second, etc. The right brain (right hemispheres) functions in the non-verbal, intuitive, creative. Under "Edit Your Writing" you state: "So far you have been using left-brain creativity. Now it is time to apply right-brain reasoning." I apologize for mis-reading this, if that is the case. ~Cynthia

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      thank you. I am thrilled to have the honor.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      Big congrats on Hub of the Day! Nice job!

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Onion-tears--I get it. Thank you.

    • chef-de-jour profile image

      Andrew Spacey 3 years ago from Near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire,UK

      Thank you. It's good to see poetry on the HOTD stage and your neat comparison of poems is a very good introduction to enjambment. That Onion poem brought tears to my eyes. Congratulations.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thanks Victoria. Now you can say, "you knew me when..." Seriously, I truly appreciate that you were one of the first to comment and encourage me.

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 3 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      Hey, I just read this yesterday! Congratulations on its being picked as HOTD! Very deserved!

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thelma: Thank. Perhaps the staff saw it as a "tips for writer" hub rather than a poetry hub. whatever, the reason it was chosen, I feel very honored.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 3 years ago from Germany

      Wow! I have not heard of a poetry as HOTD. Congratulations! Very well done. A well deserved hub.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      CrisSp: Thank you for your comment and vote. I'm starting to feel like I am have so many good friends here. I hope we will see more poetry hubs make HOTD. My guess is that it is helpful to include some text with the poem(s).

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Marlene: Thank you. The HOTD award is great, but it means even more to know that people like ouy liked the hub and found it useful.

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 3 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      Congratulations on this well deserving HOTD! I think this is the first time I saw it in poetry category but then again, this is an excellent piece with lots of useful tips.

      I absolutely enjoyed it. Voted up and sharing.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      This is really helpful. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I'm glad poets are getting noticed here on HubPages. Congratulations of receiving the Hub of the Day award.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thank you so much for voting up. I intended the advice to be for general creative writing, not just poetry. I hope you found something you could use. It was also about the joy of words and finding creativity.

    • chateaudumer profile image

      David B Katague 3 years ago from Northern California and the Philippines

      I am not a poet, but I enjoyed reading this hub. I voted heads-up! Cheers!

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Haris: thank you for your comment. You have a great image there "poetry is to life as makeup is to a woman." I see the beginnings of a poem there.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      John Sarkis: I am so knocked out by your comment. Your praise means a lot to me. It took 6 hours to do that hub, even though I already had the poems written. Knowing that people liked it and found it useful makes all the time spent worthwhile. Finding and then modifying the pictures takes a lot of time--sometimes more than the writing.

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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      tlcs: Thank you. I always proof read at least twice. I really should let a whole day go by and then proof read again, but I am too impatient to get the hub up. Proof reading is just not in my skill set. That is why I will truly appreciate it if anyone who sees an error points it out to me.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Chitran: Thank you for your comment. When I wrote this I didn't know if I'd be telling anyone anything new or not so I am glad you found it useful.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Kathleen: Thank you. I had no idea I was going to make HP history. I just thought here was a good way to burn off a few of my old poems--do something useful with them. I never expected HOTD. I hope that we will see a few more poetry hubs make the cut.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      moumit: Thank you. When the words won't flow, my practice is to put it aside and let my unconscious work on it for a few days, and then come back to it. Sometimes it takes weeks or months before I finish the poem.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      WiccanSage: Thank you for your comment. My "tips" work just as well for prose as poetry. I use the techniques for hubs too.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      MySuccess: I keep a list of poetry ideas and hub ideas. thank you for letting me know that you enjoyed my tips.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Victoria: Thank you for your comment and your vote. I'm really curious to see which one "wins." I wrote those poems when I first began writing poetry. I was feeling frustrated that my poems weren't "deep" enough. The enjambed one was one of my first attempts working with enjambment.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      DZY: Thank you for your comments. I wrote this hub because I too have folders and folders of poems in my computer. I took a few with a common theme, added text and pictures, and viola a hub. It was so nice that you could share your writing with your mother. She can still be your muse. Think of something that she used to say or do. Let that be the beginning of your poem. If your loss was recent, it might be still too painful for you. I have a poem about my mother who died of cancer at the age of 52. "My mother died too young. All mothers die too young."

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Damanee: Thank you. I'm glad you found my tips useful. I find that the unconscious can be the greatest muse. I'm going to have to do another hub and describe a poem to a pearl--the original grain of sand is the irritant and then layer and layer of words are applied.

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 3 years ago from Oakley, CA

      Congrats on HOTD!! Very nicely explained piece.

      I have reams (well, binders, anyway) of poems I've written in years past.

      I have very rarely written a poem by intent and design, except perhaps as a class assignment. My poems just "come to me," and I must scramble to get them onto paper, before I forget. For as you so wisely put it, you WILL forget! ;-)

      Trying to write a poem on purpose, for me, does not work. They come out sounding stilted and forced, and do not flow. I struggle. I've not written much at all since my mom died in 1998--she wrote as well, and we shared--I think my muse died with her.

      Voted up, interesting and useful.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Martie G: Almost Elizabethan. I may swoon from such high praise. Thank you.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Wow! Thank you all for your compliments. I was getting the feeling that HP doesn't care much for poetry and now HOTD! I look at this as all pets getting recognized by proxy. If I can do a post script to my hub, my final tip would be: Add some meaningful text to the poem. It gets the word count up and provides context.

    • Harishprasad profile image

      Harish Mamgain 3 years ago from India

      Congrats on HOTD ! This is a great stuff plus very interesting and useful. Catherine, you have penned a wonderful hub on a great craft called poetry. Poetry is to life what makeup is to a woman ! Thank you, voted up.

    • John Sarkis profile image

      John Sarkis 3 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      Excellent. This has to be one of the best hubs around - winner of HOTD or otherwise! Voted up!!!

    • tlcs profile image

      Trudy Cooper 3 years ago from Hampshire, UK

      Good ideas, very well thought out, one thing I would say however is always proof read, I look forward to your next hub.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Congratulations for HOTD!

      I don't remember any poem getting this recognition. That itself is a reward.

      A well written hub with so many meaningful examples. Voted up!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Wow, I can't believe a poetry hub has won HOTD....hope this is the start of things to come. Congratulations Catherine.

    • Kathleen Cochran profile image

      Kathleen Cochran 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      A HOD on POETRY?! Never thought I'd see the day on HP! Congrats! And good for the selection committee - breaking new ground.

    • moumitadasgupta86 profile image

      Moumita Dasgupta 3 years ago from Kolkata

      Though words just simply needs a smooth path to flow...but paths are never smooth to remove those tiny obstacles that do not allow words to flow freely.....these tips are really worthy...I liked your hub Catherine :)

    • WiccanSage profile image

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 3 years ago

      Great ideas. Poetry has never been my strong point, but sometimes I've got to get something out in verse. Nice hub, congrats on Hub of the Day.

    • mySuccess8 profile image

      mySuccess8 3 years ago

      A very useful lesson for beginners like me. I also always bring along a pen and a small piece of paper wherever I go, to ensure ideas are quickly noted before they are forgotten. Nice hub and congrats on HotD!

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 3 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      I voted for the enjambed one, but I loved the end-stop one, too. I think it's whatever a writer is in the mood for! Nice hub--and great examples!

    • Damanee Bailey profile image

      Damanee 3 years ago from Jamaica

      Powerful knowledge, I will use them when I am writing my next poem. You have make a great contribution, keep it up!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Sounds good to me , thanks.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      I very much appreciate it whenever anyone let's me know I have made an error. Sometimes I just pick a hub at random and re-proof. I don't want stupid errors marring the hubs that I put so much effort into. I will repay the favor. We can look out for each other.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Sorry to make you have to go over it again Catherine. I had to just go back over one of my hubs for the umpteenth time after a friend pointed out some errors. I'd rather they point them out and get it sorted rather than everyone read the errors and just say nothing.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thank you for letting me know about the need to proofread this a third time. I am such a bad proof-reader. My poetry teacher said she liked the end-stop version better also so you are not alone in that preference.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      A very thorough and informative hub Catherine. The poetry examples are great too. It seems as though I'm alone, but I preferred the directness and no-nonsense end-stop version. Thanks for sharing your personal writing process. Voted up. p.s. The Naughty Grammarian hasn't been through this hub with a fine tooth comb though :)

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Marti: Thanks for letting me know that you enjoyed this. One of the reasons I write is because it is so rewarding to entertain people.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thank you for letting me know that you found this useful. One of the reasons I write is because it is so rewarding to help people.

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      Cracknutcase 3 years ago from India,bangalore

      A very helpful hub esp for amateurs like me...! Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us :)

    • MartieG profile image

      MartieG aka 'survivoryea' 3 years ago from Jersey Shore

      Thoroughly enjoyed reading this-definitely enjoyed the Enjambed version almost a modern Elizabethan.

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thanks Audrey. I think the tips for writers may be a more for beginners than for the experienced writers like you and other hubbers, but I am hoping for readers outside of the HP community. I thought hubbers might enjoy the poems tho.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      What a great hub! I also like the enjambed version. Sometimes enjambment is the difference between prose and poetry for me--

    • CatherineGiordano profile image
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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Thank you Heidi. I appreciate your comment, the votes, and the share.

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      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      I think I like the Enjamed version better because it seems more organic... which poetry is all about. Great tips for connecting thought with paper (or screen). Voted up, useful and sharing!