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Gerald Stern's "I Who Lifted a Car"

Updated on September 21, 2017
Maya Shedd Temple profile image

After I fell in love with Walter de la Mare's "Silver" in Mrs. Edna Pickett's sophomore English class, circa 1962, poetry became my passion.

Gerald Stern

"I Who Lifted a Car"

My lips say the words too slow
but I am a drop in the bucket
and my body will never catch up
for I am going in reverse
and my slow mind has ruined me;

and pound for pound the fleabane
weighs the same as iron does
and one of my obsessions
is guessing the weight of bridges,
I who traveled by car,

and I can guess the weight
of a woman I am so good
though my lips says the words too slow
and my heart goes out to a woman,
I who drove a car.

But I am a drop in the bucket
and my body will never catch up
for I am going in reverse
and my slow mind has ruined me,
I who lifted a car.

Commentary

Gerald Stern's "I Who Lifted a Car" features four cinquains. Its theme is self-deprecation. The speaker is aging and unsettled by the degeneration of his physical and mental faculties.

First Cinquain: "My lips say the words too slow"

The speaker begins his litany of complaints by remarking that his "lips say the words too slow." He might have added ungrammatically, as he saw fit to let an adjective do the work of an adverb. The next line features a reconstituted cliché: "I am a drop in the bucket," ostensibly allowing the reader to associate that the speaker is about to kick the bucket, while merely stating that he is not important.

The speaker then reports that his body will never catch up because he is "going in reverse." Then he complains that his slow mind has ruined him. He does not make clear just what it is with which he will never catch up. Quite possibly, he is going in reverse back to his childhood, another clichéd scheme that the aging human being re-enters his childhood, if he lives long enough to experience dementia.

Second Cinquain: "and pound for pound the fleabane"

The speaker again reconstitutes an old concept: the trick-riddle, which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of lead? This speaker, for whom the reader at this point must begin to feel sympathetic, easily forgives these lapses; after all, the speaker has admitted that he is suffering from the on-set of Alzheimers. Therefore, instead of deriding the cliché, the reader has to defend them as rather clever for a mind that is in ruin.

Thus, the fleabane and the iron having the same weight pound for pound demonstrates the presence at least of some agility of mind. The speaker then claims, "one of my obsessions / is guessing the weight of bridges." He follows this confession with the revelation that he has, indeed, "traveled by car." No doubt, he has seen those bridges whose weight over which he obsessed, while traveling by car.

Third Cinquain: "and I can guess the weight"

The speaker then unveils the dubious factoid that he can "guess the weight / of a woman," because he is so good. He adds that even though his lips says the words too slow, his '"heart goes out to a woman." Again, the grammar deficiency, "lips says," but again the reader understands that this is the speaker's ruined mind at work.

That the speaker's heart goes out to a woman remains unqualified and unelaborated; she must remain a mystery woman. The speaker then adds, "I who drove a car. " Not only did he travel by car back when he was becoming obsessed with the weight of bridges, but he also drove a car.

Fourth Cinquain: But I am a drop in the bucket

The fourth cinquain features a villanelle-like repetition of early lines: the speaker is a "drop in the bucket," his "body will never catch up," he is "going in reverse," and his "slow mind has ruined [him]." All this downbeat hodgepodge is happening to someone who lifted a car, an important line because it also titles the poem.

It is quite appropriate that the reader cannot be sure if by "lifted a car" the speaker means that he stole a car or he raised a car from the ground with his muscles. It is likely the latter, but either would imply a strength of body and mind, the loss of which the speaker is now lamenting.

Gerald Stern reading his poem, "Frogs"

© 2015 Linda Sue Grimes

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    • Maya Shedd Temple profile image
      Author

      Linda Sue Grimes 2 years ago from U.S.A.

      John, Thank you for responding and posting that quotation. Poetry is the sum total of what poets and lovers of poetry say it is, and the definition is never, thankfully, complete . . .

    • Maya Shedd Temple profile image
      Author

      Linda Sue Grimes 2 years ago from U.S.A.

      I love what Toi Derricotte opined about Stern: “Gerald Stern has made an immense contribution to American poetry. His poems are not only great poems, memorable ones, but ones that get into your heart and stay there. Their lyrical ecstasies take you up for that moment so that your vision is changed, you are changed. The voice is intimate, someone unafraid to be imperfect. Gerald Stern’s poems sing in praise of the natural world, and in outrage of whatever is antihuman.”

    • Mihnea Andreescu profile image

      Mihnea-Andrei Andreescu 2 years ago from Tilburg

      What a titan of Surrealism Gerald Stern is!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Thank you Maya, glad you like that quotation.

    • Maya Shedd Temple profile image
      Author

      Linda Sue Grimes 2 years ago from U.S.A.

      Thank you, John! Love your quotation: "Poetry is a gentle river flowing through a rocky and mountainous landscape of prose." Look forward to perusing more of your creative efforts!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Thank you for sharing this interesting poem and for your synopsis.

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