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How To Write

Updated on August 17, 2016
It's more about your ideas and even more about your words.
It's more about your ideas and even more about your words. | Source

Most people have always viewed writing as a task given the myth that their writing is supposed to sound like high end text with intellectual words that practically go above the reader's head and make them pick up a dictionary.

I will break some myths right here.
1. Writing is not supposed to sound like high or low end text, Writing is just writing and it is what you make of it.
2. It is NOT a task unless you want to make it one.
3. Your content doesn't need to sound like an intellectual's speech or a page taken out a novelist's diary.
4. You need to first understand what you're writing and then cater to the readers.

Here's a neat and simple guide to what could make you write better and love what you write.
1. Decide on a topic and chalk out the ideas and points in your head.
You need to have a clear picture of what you're talking about. Writing without a clear picture will make you falter in the middle, stop at odd points and your content is going to sound really rough and jagged. You might end up writing in he beginning, jump to another idea and then you might just end up drifting away from the topic itself, something you or your readers wouldn't want.

2. Research.
Don't ever try to write about something you don't know anything about. Remember, you're not just for yourself, but for others too. You can't afford to give out wrong or incomplete information. Go in depth about what you're writing so that you can add to it your own ideas and understanding too. Find out references, opinions and statements given by people on the topic and the background, and almost everything else possible. You need to be comfortable with what you're writing and for that you need to know what you're writing by knowing more about it. Know enough to make sure you can talk about it or you'll just make a fool of yourself.

2. Organize your ideas.
Without organization, your content is going to sound really unattractive, scattered and dis interesting. Let alone your readers, you might lose interest in your own content. Keep the ideas flowing with simplicity and lucidity, well enough for your readers to know what you're trying to convey. The idea isn't to just give them information, the idea is to give them a well arranged content of information, something that keeps them engaged onto the article or your content. Jump gracefully from one point to the other; keeping an introduction, a body and a conclusion. Keep it neat like a flowchart and clear enough so that the readers can remember even after reading it one time, what they actually read.

3. Bombastic language is not a necessity.
It's a myth that bombastic language attracts people and keeps them hooked on to it. If someone is forced to read your content with their dictionary wide open in front of them, trust me, you're doing it all wrong. We understand that you might have a rich vocabulary that you might like to flaunt and shower on your writing but honestly, not everyone wants to know about what the meanings of your words, they want to know the meaning of your writing and content. The key to a good piece is to use vocabulary which connects with everyone and most people like to absorb and read words which are lucid, simple and yet, make a sharp statement. You can substitute words and then elaborate a little on them but still not lose out on the context. Your choice of words also depends on your audience.

4. Your style of writing
It's crucial to keep the style of your writing consistent and uniform. You can sound really formal in some patches of content and then super friendly in others. It shows inconsistency. Don't twist your language a lot by using various metaphors, similes, personification, etc. It's general content you're writing for your audience, not a story or a poem. But then, your style of writing also differs based on what you're writing. If you're writing poetry, try to keep as much imagery as possible because that's the only creative way to attract your reader. Don't be too flowery, we all know how much we hate Shakespeare. You want the reader to read your mind and feelings, not try to wrap his head around your words and lose the essence of what you've written.
Experiment with new styles because poetry is not all about the rhyme. It's about how you bring out your thoughts on paper.

When it comes to technical writing (coming from someone who is currently undergoing training as a technical writer in an IT company), stick to the point. Use the needed terminology and keep your content as informative as possible and better if you give all if it in as less as possible. Keep the language clear and sharp. The reader should know what you're trying to tell them. Stick to the guidelines you have been given and you should be just fine.

5. Revise your content.
It's the last and most important stage of the whole process and without it, writing is just like doing yet another activity for leisure. Run a good eye over your content before putting it out there. For all you know, there could be many sentence formations gone wrong, spelling errors and other grammatical errors that you would notice after finishing it. We all tend to just ignore it while writing and there's no shame in accepting it. Even better, after getting over with all of it, take a break and get back to your work. A clear mind helps you to polish off the most vague things written and the numerous faults you might have made. If you still want perfection, give it to someone for review. They might be able to give the last form of critical comments and suggestions which will help you to a great extent.

With all this covered, you're ready to venture off with your brain, pen and paper (or laptop, if you will!)

All the best!

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