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How to Get Your Articles Accepted at Constant Content

Updated on May 26, 2011

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Introduction

Constant Content sometimes scares new writers off. The site has a very strict set of grammar and style rules, and its three strike rule lets writers know that too many rejections could lead to their account being disabled.

So, when new writers get an email or two from Constant Content saying that their article has been reviewed and found wanting, many of them give up. Some people are so intimidated by the prospect the writing and review process at Constant Content that they never try at all. These people have a brand new Constant Content author account that just sits empty, never making them anything.

Getting repeated acceptances by Constant Content is very doable, but it takes some work, and it takes a good level of understanding of certain principles. This hub will explain these principles and rules so that you can really take off and start making money with Constant Content.

If you're not already an author at Constant Content, click here to sign up for free. Or, if you'd like an in-depth walk through of the sign up process, visit my hub on how to sign up for Constant Content.

Constant Content Logo
Constant Content Logo

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Learn the Rules

Constant Content runs on strict rules. Break them, and your article will get rejected. However, because these rules are so exact, once you learn them, you'll hardly ever get an article rejection again. Once you've signed up, you can find these rules from your Constant Content author page. Simply click on the button that says “Help.” From there, you'll see a list of different helpful links under the heading Author Help. The most helpful two of these from the standpoint of getting your articles accepted will be the ones titled “Quick Start Writer Guidelines” and “Extended Writer Guidelines.”

As soon as you sign up for Constant Content, you should familiarize yourself with the quick start guidelines. This is a quick and dirty list of things that will solve a large number of your initial questions.

You should also look through Constant Content's extended writer guidelines. There's a lot of information there, so don't worry if you can't get it all to stick in your head at once. It's good to go through it all at least once, though. Then, put a bookmark in the extended writer guidelines and refer to it often as you're writing. Then, refer to the guidelines again when it comes time to edit your article.

Learning these guidelines can be a little tedious. However, it is extremely necessary. If you can really understand and apply the grammatical and style rules, you won't get Constant Content article rejections. If you put in the time, you'll be very happy you did later.

There isn't enough time or space here to explain all of Constant Content's rules. However, I'm going to go over a few of the more important ones and unexpected ones.

First, write grammatically and use correct spelling. This is pretty basic, but it is crucial if you want Constant Content to accept your articles.

Second, all submissions have to be in 12 pt Arial or Times New Roman font. This is the default on most word processors, so it shouldn't be too hard. However, you'll feel pretty dumb if you get rejected for using the wrong font. I accidentally submitted my first Constant Content article in 10 pt font, and sure enough it was rejected.

Third, use an appropriate tone. Constant Content typically wants articles with a professional tone. Having a professional tone doesn't mean that you can't use humor, but it will affect the type of humor you use, and it will affect the way you word things. Think of the way things are worded in news releases or informational articles, and try to emulate that sort of feel.

Fourth, avoid using “I,” “me,” and similar pronouns. Constant Content does not allow first person narratives. If you find yourself wanting to write “I” into an article, try to find a different way to express it. Similarly, do not refer to the reader as “you.”

Fifth, Constant Content does not accept links or website addresses in its articles. If you want to cite a source, you need to remove the hyperlinks and omit the usual “http://www” prefix. So, for example google.com would be acceptable, while http://www.google.com would not.

Rules like these sometimes trip up new writers at Constant Content. Even writers with a great deal of experience elsewhere will need to spend a little bit of time learning Constant Content's particular rules. Luckily, it doesn't usually take too long before you're used to the way you need to write at Constant Content. Typically, it'll be pretty second nature by the end of your first month or so.

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Writing Your Articles

As you work on your articles, make sure that you are writing grammatically. If you are like most people, as you write, you will occasionally run into spots where you don't know what the proper grammatical construction would be. In these cases, you should consult the Constant Content extended guidelines, and you can also feel free to use any other grammar resources that you have handy.

If you have a question about a grammatical or style issue, don't just guess and hope for the best. Try to learn the right answer. This will help you to avoid rejections and Constant Content, and it will help you throughout your writing career.

Also, make sure that you are writing real, informative work, not just your opinions. Constant Content isn't looking for editorials or opinion pieces. It wants content with real informational value.

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Proofread

When you've finished your article, set it down and let it sit. I typically try to give each of my Constant Content articles a day's break. This helps me to be tuned in and actually interested when it comes time to proofread. Run your article through your spell check. If you don't have a spell or grammar check, don't worry. There are a number of online options that you can use for free.

Use these automated options, but don't rely on them too much. There are an awful lot of grammar mistakes that an automated checker will miss, but that a Constant Content editor won't. You'll need to do some proofreading on your own.

Read your article to yourself, slowly and out loud. Make sure you're reading what's actually on the screen, not what you expect to see. This simple tip can help you to catch mistakes that you would otherwise miss.

You can also let a friend or family member with good grammar skills read over your Constant Content article. A new set of eyes can often catch mistakes that the author might miss.

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Plagiarism Check

Constant Content runs every one of its articles through Copyscape, an anti-plagiarism checker. This plagiarism checker is so powerful that it can even occasionally pick up on plagiarism that isn't there! I once submitted an article to Constant Content which I had written without consulting or copying from any other sites. I had written about this topic a number of times under a different pen name and I unconsciously used a sentence or two that I had already written. Shortly thereafter I received an email from Constant Content telling me that my submission had been rejected due to plagiarism and that my account was in danger of being disabled!

Because of this, it can be helpful to run your work through a plagiarism detector of your own, just so that you avoid any accidental problems. There are a number of free resources that allow you to check an article for plagiarism.

How to Submit an Article for A Constant Content Request

How to Get Your Articles Accepted by Constant Content: Submission

Some people have a perfectly acceptable article, but they are rejected by Constant Content because of mistakes made during the submission process. Making sure you follow the submission guidelines will help protect you from unnecessary rejections.

You'll need to input your article's title. Make sure that it is in title case. If you are concerned about whether your title is properly capitalized, you can use an automatic title case converter. You'll also want to make sure you select the appropriate category for your Constant Content article. However, determining where your article should be listed isn't usually too difficult.

All Constant Content articles also need to have a short summary included with them. Like the articles themselves, these short summaries should not be written in the first or second person. They also need to be error-free, and they should be at least thirty word long. They should not use promotional language. Rather, they should just give an accurate, but compelling summary of your article.

Constant Content also requires articles to have an excerpt from your article. Simply copy and paste a portion of your article into the appropriate box. Make sure that your excerpt includes at least 1/3 of your article. If your excerpt is too short, your article could be rejected.

Give an accurate word count of your article in the appropriate box. Do not count your title and summary in this count. You should be able to use your word processor's word count feature to get this number. However, there are also a number of online options.

If you make sure to do all of these things, Constant Content shouldn't reject your article based on submission errors.

What to Do If Constant Content Rejects Your Article

The heading above should really be “What to Do When Constant Content Rejects Your Article.” If you write for Constant Content for any length of time, you will get rejected from time to time. That's okay. Just take a deep breath, don't give up, and don't let it get to you. Then, try to learn from it.

In the email notifying you of your article's rejection, Constant Content will tell you exactly why. This can help you to grow as a writer. If you got burnt on a grammar or style rule you didn't know, try to learn more about it. If you get rejected for a rule that you already know, commit to proofreading more carefully. If you learn from your mistakes, your rejections at Constant Content will become rarer and rarer as time goes on.

Don't worry about getting banned from Constant Content for occasional rejections. As long as you're providing good, quality content, an occasional rejection shouldn't be anything to worry about.

Also, when Constant Content rejects an article, it doesn't mean that you aren't allowed to resubmit a fixed version of article again. On most of my rejections, I was able to perform a quick grammar fix and send it right back in again. I've never had Constant Content reject an article a second time, after the original problem was fixed.

How to Get Your Articles Accepted on Constant Content: Final Thoughts

Now, all of this might sound like a lot of work. If your grammar and writing needs a lot of work, then all of the learning, writing, and proofreading might take you a little while. However, as time goes on, your skills will improve. The entire process will be streamlined, making it easier to get your Constant Content articles written, accepted, and sold.

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    • WannaB Writer profile image

      Barbara Radisavljevic 6 years ago from Templeton, CA

      I'm not familiar with this site. If I'm ever ready to take on a fourth writing site, I might look into this, but right now I already have too much on my plate. Thanks for sharing what you know.

    • Christian H. profile image
      Author

      Christian H. 6 years ago from College Station, Texas

      @WannaB Writer

      Yeah, I've liked Constant Content pretty well. It's pretty good for making money right away. I've been doing more here at Hubpages lately, though, because I'm trying to get more passive income options going.

    • anish92 profile image

      anish92 6 years ago

      Terrific post! I got my first article on cc rejected because:

      "There must be a double space between all paragraphs. /// " Though very specialized equipments are not required at an amateur level," --- grammar error *equipment is not* /// "A lens of a short focal length requires a corresponding less extension to produce a given image magnification than a lens of longer focal length; and the larger the extension the longer is the exposure time needed for proper exposure." --- Semicolon/comma/grammar errors *Needs a comma after "larger the extension." Also, the semicolon should be changed to a comma."

      and gave up.

      But now I am seriously thinking of giving it another shot.

      Thanks for the inspiration and thanks for answering my question about CC article rights (read that hub as well).

      voted up and USEFUL

    • Christian H. profile image
      Author

      Christian H. 6 years ago from College Station, Texas

      @anish92--Thank you! I'm so glad that you enjoyed the post, and I hope it ends up being helpful for you.

      Yeah, they're sticklers on the grammar, alright. Everything kind of has to be just so. But the good news is once you learn their rules, there aren't usually many surprise rejections.

    • viryabo profile image

      viryabo 6 years ago

      Rated up. Thanks for the detailed information.

      Cheers

    • Gemma Sidney profile image

      Gemma Sidney 6 years ago from Co Clare, Ireland

      Thanks for this hub. You've inspired me to give CC another go. I had two articles rejected for silly mistakes (such as using the wrong font size) and I gave up. It's good that they are such sticklers for good grammar. It ensures that they only offer quality articles.

    • profile image

      Rajib_Bangladesh 6 years ago

      At first I wanna give you thnx for giving a detailed information on article writing. Before reading this article, I was in fix that how could I improve myself in writing article. But now, its clear to Me..... So, thnx again.......

    • Bethaleg profile image

      Bethaleg 4 years ago from Minnesota

      I am reading your Constant Content series and am appreciative of the great information you have provided. I plan on using many of the resources you have listed here to make sure I'm ready to submit : ) Voted up as useful.

    • GetitScene profile image

      Dale Anderson 4 years ago from The High Seas

      Voted up. I wish I had read this before submitting my first article.

    • Torrs13 profile image

      Tori Canonge 2 years ago from California

      This hub makes me feel a lot better about writing for Constant Content. I have heard that they are strict, but I can definitely understand why. I am still trying to learn about usage rights and stuff there, but with some research and time, I'm sure I'll be able to have it all figured out. Thanks for sharing your tips with us! They definitely helped me :)

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