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Inspire Your Muse by Going to the Fair

Updated on September 12, 2017

Inspiration can be found anywhere. All you need is something to see, and the fair is a great place. There is so much variety of people and events going on at one time. People from all walks of life and backgrounds come to a fair. As you go about the grounds of the fair ground, take note of what you see: people, rides, landmarks, animals, shows, and so much more.

Whether you are writing a book, want to paint or scene, or write a song, the fair can be something gets your muse working overtime with all sorts of cool ideas. The key is to think of what is possible and what is impossible. The fair helps you out by offering you up such a variety of resources.

So Many People

This is a great place to find inspiration. After all you are in public where anything will happen and probably will. Nothing is ‘normal’ there. You get it all in one location with people moving around you might not encounter anywhere else. Some might even be from out of town. Rich, middle-class, and poor interact. Educated and not are present. Young and old. They are all in one place.

Look around you. Take in all the activity. What is happening? It could be a couple with their child throwing a tantrum. Maybe it is the couple kissing under a waterfall. There is the small child lost from his parents. An old couple remembering their courting days. The vendor trying to get customers to buy his goods. It could literally be anything.

Listen to conversations around you. There will be laughter from something funny happening. What is behind the laugh? Would could be behind the laugh? Maybe you hear a shout. Is it good or bad? Close your eyes and just listen to all the noise that moves around the fair.

Watch how people are acting. Ask yourself, “What if?” It doesn’t matter what it is, explore the possibilities. Don’t follow the logical path. That’s boring. Let your imagination go wild. Think of the impossible or fantastical. Step outside the logic box and let your imagination get behind the wheel.

Take something funny that happens and let your muse have fun. Take something strange, frightening, or even sad and come up with an idea. Mentally scan the different genres and see what your muse finds around you.

Make it a game with someone you are at a fair with. See who can come up with the most creative, bizarre or scary story ideas.

Explore

Go into sections of the fair you have never been to before. If you normally don't see the shows, go there. Watch what happens around you. There might be a scene in one of your books where a character is at such a place. Pay attention to the smells, the sounds, the feel of the breeze. This can all be used to inspire you.

There are animal exhibits. Talk to the people who have animals there. Listen to their conversations. What story do you see coming about?

I know that at our fair, the layout is usually same every year, but there is always something new to see or experience. It could be food, shows, educational stalls, or rides.

Think of the Impossibilities

At the fair last year, my teenage daughter talked me into riding the Zipper. I used to love that ride, but I was a lot younger then. It had been years since I had gotten on a carnival ride. I did it, and it was so much fun. During the ride, my daughter and I began to talk about "what if" scenarios. Of course, it had to come up that the cage we were being flipped around in could fly off. That conversation led to other ideas, but then one really struck me. She asked how the operators would react if they opened up the locked cage only to find it empty where we had been minutes before. Where had we gone? Where the impossibilities? Maybe a different dimension. It could be anything. We had fun talking about it.

Think of the impossible scenarios that could happen at the fair and discover new stories

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