ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Letters Dd and Ee Vocabulary Mistakes that Bedevil English Speakers and Learners

Updated on September 25, 2012
Yes, it's possible to avoid the most common English vocabulary mistakes.
Yes, it's possible to avoid the most common English vocabulary mistakes. | Source

10 Common Vocabulary Errors in Letters Dd and Ee

English vocabulary can be a knotty subject for many learners and some speakers of the English language.

This is because there are so many words in English that seem to mean the same but actually have very fine differences in definitions.

Knowing how and when to use these words does make a lot of positive effects in sentences, which become clear and easily understood when appropriate words are used.

Below is a list of the ten most common vocabulary mistakes that start in letters Dd and Ee and some suggestions on how to avoid them.

1. Descent versus Dissent

Descent means to fall, dive, crash or decline whereas dissent means to differ, dispute or balk.

Example:

Wrong: We do not ever want to be close-minded so we neither discount descent nor take it lightly.

Right: We do not ever want to be close-minded so we neither discount dissent nor take it lightly.

2. Desert versus Dessert

A desert is a very hot and parched region that is often considered either a wasteland or wilderness. A dessert is often a sinful, heavenly, and sweet food that can be eaten on its own or as the last part of a meal.

Example:

Wrong: I think I’m going to order desert. My meal is never complete without one.

Right: I think I’m going to order dessert. My meal is never complete without one.

3. Differ from versus Differ With

Differ from is used to refer to differences of features while differ with is used to refer to differences of opinion. The latter also refers to conflict or misunderstanding.

Example:

Wrong: The latest product version differs with the old one in style and function. Still, I would say that the old version is better.

Right: The latest product version differs from the old one in style and function. Still, I would say that the old version is better.

4. Discreet versus Discrete

Being discreet means being tactful, careful, and cautious not to offend others. Being discrete means being detached or isolated.

Example:

Wrong: Wary of causing a stir, the reality TV show star exited the restaurant discretely.

Right: Wary of causing a stir, the reality TV show star exited the restaurant discreetly.

5. Disinterested versus Uninterested

To be disinterested is to be unbiased, objective, or open-minded. To be uninterested is to be unconcerned or dispassionate.

Example:

Wrong: Public opinion polls show that most of the people think that the verdict was uninterested and that the judge weighed the pieces of evidence thoroughly.

Right: Public opinion polls show that most of the people think that the verdict was disinterested and that the judge weighed the pieces of evidence thoroughly.

6. Each Other versus One Another

Each other is used to point out to two elements while one another is used to point out to more than two elements.

Example:

Wrong: In a lavish and romantic ceremony, the newlyweds vowed to love one another until death.

Right: In a lavish and romantic ceremony, the newlyweds vowed to love each other until death.

7. Elder versus Older

An elder is a noun that refers to a person who is advanced in age while older is an adjective that refers to the long age of something or someone.

Example:

Wrong: We respect our olders and take good care of them. It’s a practice among many of us in our hometown.

Right: We respect our elders and take good care of them. It’s a practice among many of us in our hometown.

8. Eminent versus Imminent

Somebody who is eminent enjoys a good reputation or positive perception. Something that is imminent is about to take place sooner rather than later.

Example:

Wrong: It cannot be helped. The collapse of this economy is eminent.

Right: It cannot be helped. The collapse of this economy is imminent.

9. Especially versus Specially

Especially is used in the same way as particularly. Specially, on the other hand, is used in the same manner as specifically.

Example:

Wrong: This limited-edition watch was especially made for the actress and the lucky 5,000 members of her rabid fan base.

Right: This limited-edition watch was specially made for the actress and the lucky 5,000 members of her rabid fan base.

10. Explicit versus Implicit

Something that is explicit is openly and clearly stated. Something that is implicit is indirectly or obscurely stated.

Example:

Wrong: She said it many vague ways. It’s quite explicit that she wants out.

Right: She said it many vague ways. It’s quite implicit that she wants out.

Copyright © 2011 Kerlyn Bautista

All Rights Reserved

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • jfay2011 profile image

      jfay2011 

      6 years ago

      very good hub. We all from time to time can't figure out how to spell something. I just downloaded the online dictionary and spell checker. Giving most of my book forms away.

    • Pikachusif profile image

      Pikachusif 

      6 years ago from Castelia City, Unova

      Very nice Hub. English is rather tricky in itself, and I believe that everyone (Who speaks fluent English) must know these rules to make clear speech a reality.

    • asmaiftikhar profile image

      asmaiftikhar 

      6 years ago from Pakistan

      voted up! k as usual an informative and useful hub.

    • twobmad profile image

      Ruatte 

      6 years ago from Myanmar(Burma)

      Very well written Sis. I sure need this kind of lesson.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)