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Letters Ff, Gg and Hh Vocabulary Mistakes that Bedevil English Speakers and Learners

Updated on September 25, 2012
Less English vocabulary mistakes, less confusion, less mix-up.
Less English vocabulary mistakes, less confusion, less mix-up. | Source

10 Common Vocabulary Errors in Letters Ff, Gg and Hh

English vocabulary is a very tricky subject for many native users and students of the English language.

This is because there are so many easily confused English words – those with the same spelling and/or pronunciation but different meanings.

It is quite important to keep in mind these commonly confused words to avoid misunderstanding or outright embarrassment.

Below are ten vocabulary mistakes that bedevil English speakers and learners and that start with letters Ff, Gg, and Hh.

1. Farther versus Further

The preposition farther always refers to distance or space while the word further can either be an adjective or a verb that refers to time or degree.

Example:

Wrong: No conclusive piece of evidence yet. Farther studies need to be done.

Right: No conclusive piece of evidence yet. Further studies need to be done.

2. Fewer versus Less

The word fewer is used to refer to numbers of countable nouns. Less refers to the amount of non-countable nouns.

Example:

Wrong: We have fewer time than before so we need to move quicker than ever.

Right: We have less time than before so we need to move quicker than ever.

3. Former versus Latter

Former is used to refer to the first of two subjects mentioned in a sentence. Latter is used to refer to the second.

Example:

Wrong: Mimi and Lulu are twins. I love them both but the former – Lulu – is just a bit more adorable than the latter – Mimi.

Right: Mimi and Lulu are twins. I love them both but the latter – Lulu – is just a bit more adorable than the former – Mimi.

5. Gourmet versus Gourmand

A gourmet is somebody who has a fine taste in food and drinks while a gourmand is somebody with a huge appetite for food and drinks.

Example:

Wrong: He’s a gourmand. He studied culinary arts in France, natural food preparation in Japan, and organic food ingredients in several parts of Asia.

Right: He’s a gourmet. He studied culinary arts in France, natural food preparation in Japan, and organic food ingredients in several parts of Asia.

4. Feasible versus Possible

When people say that something is feasible, then what they mean is that thing is capable of being made or completed. When people say that something is possible, then what they mean is that thing is capable of occurring or taking place.

Example:

Wrong: The executive board turned down the proposal. It said that the proposal is not possible for it will eat up three-fourths of the company’s profits without any guarantee of long-term success.

Right: The executive board turned down the proposal. It said that the proposal is not feasible for it will eat up three-fourths of the company’s profits without any guarantee of long-term success.

6. Grateful to versus Grateful for

One should be grateful to a person or people and grateful for one or several things.

Example:

Wrong: My life is far from perfect. Still, I am grateful to all the things that happened for they made me the strong person I am today.

Right: My life is far from perfect. Still, I am grateful for all the things that happened for they made me the strong person I am today.

7. Formally versus Formerly

Formally describes an action that was done in a formal manner. Formerly describes an action that happened in the past or previously.

Example:

Wrong: The host formerly ended the swanky event with a toast of a limited-edition French wine.

Right: The host formally ended the swanky event with a toast of a limited-edition French wine.

8. Hanged versus Hung

Hanged refers to a person while hung refers to an object.

Example:

Wrong: He got no reprieve from the authorities so he was hung at daybreak.

Right: He got no reprieve from the authorities so he was hanged at daybreak.

9. Homogeneous versus Homogenous

Homogeneous describes things or people that are identical or similar. Homogenous describes things or people from a common origin.

Example:

Wrong: It is quite interesting how this village has a homogeneous population. Local people have the same genetic make-up.

Right: It is quite interesting how this village has a homogenous population. Local people have the same genetic make-up.

10. Human versus Humane

A person is a human. A person is humane if he or she is kindhearted and sympathetic.

Example:

Wrong: In a shocking gesture, the dictator showed his human side by extending pardon to his enemies.

Right: In a shocking gesture, the dictator showed his humane side by extending pardon to his enemies.

Copyright © 2011 Kerlyn Bautista

All Rights Reserved

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    • nemanjaboskov profile image

      Nemanja Boškov 

      6 years ago from Serbia

      Another great hub!

      I particularly liked the ninth example - well one!

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