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Online Stories for Children

Updated on January 28, 2013

The Duty of a True Friend

Once upon a time, there lived a pair of parrots on a tree. An old snake also lived in the cavity of the same tree. The snake was too weak to go out looking for food. So, the parrots used to leave some food near the cavity. The snake was thankful to the parrots.
One day, a vulture hovered over the tree to hunt parrots. Just then, a hunter also came there. He aimed at one of the parrots with an arrow.
When the snake noticed his friends under extreme double danger, it bit the foot of the hunter to save his friends. The sudden snake bite spoilt his aim and the arrow struck the vulture hovering above.
The pair parrots were too busy with their sweet conversation to even realise what had happened. But the snake had fulfilled his duty as a friend by saving their lives


The blue jackal

The Story of the Blue Jackal


Once a jackal entered the house of a washer man and hid in a vat full of blue colour used for bleaching clothes. When he came out, he was dyed blue.
The jackal came back to the forest. All the animals got frightened on seeing him different. The jackal said, “There is no need to be afraid. I am a special creation of God. He has sent me as your king.”
All the animals in the jungle accepted him as their king. They killed other animals and brought them as food for him.
One day when the blue jackal was holding court, he heard a pack of jackals howling. Thrilled by the sound of his own ilk, he too began howling loudly like them.

The animals understood that their king was after all a jackal and not sent by God. They beat him hard.

The Unwelcome Guests


Once upon a time, a rich businessman lived in the city of Ujjain. He had four sons-in-law, who arrived one day as guests of the businessman. He treated them with great respect but they over-stayed at his home.
The businessman and his wife became concerned as they showed no signs of going back. The businessman then asked his wife not to give their sons-in-law water to wash their feet. She followed these instructions the next day.

One son-in-law, who was very intelligent, understood that they were no longer welcome. So, he immediately returned to his own home.
The next day, the three remaining sons-in-law were given very shabby chairs to sit on. The second son-in-law too departed for his home. The third son-in-law too left for his home after he was served stale food.
But the fourth son-in-law refused to take all the hints that his in-laws gave him.
Finally, the businessman forced him out of the door.

The Selfish Wolf and the Crane


One day, a wolf found bull’s meat in the jungle. He started devouring the meat greedily. A piece of bone got stuck in his throat. All his efforts to cough it out or swallow it down failed. It became difficult for him to even breathe.
Then the wolf remembered a crane, who lived nearby. The wolf went to the crane and pleaded for help and promised a reward in return.”
The crane took pity on the wolf and agreed to help. The wolf opened its jaws wide and the crane easily took out the bone, thus the wolf was relieved.
The crane then reminded the wolf of the promised reward.
“What reward?” the wolf remarked. “When your beak was in my mouth I could have grinded it with my teeth.”
Before the crane could react, the selfish wolf had dashed away.

The Dog Who Went Abroad


Once there lived a smart dog called Chitranga.
One year, a severe famine struck the town and Chitranga could not find anything to eat. So he ran away in desperation to a faraway land.
There was no shortage of food in this new land. He wandered into the backyard of a house where he ate to his heart’s content and became a regular visitor there.
One day, some of the other local dogs spotted him. At once, they recognised that he was a stranger in their land. They attacked him so mercilessly that he was severely injured.
Finally when he escaped from them, he thought to himself, ‘I should better leave this place, if I want to stay alive. There may be a famine in my own land, but at least the dogs there are of my own kind.’

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