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Original Poem: "A Salt Sea" with Commentary

Updated on November 21, 2019
Maya Shedd Temple profile image

Writing poetry became my major composing activity circa 1962, & Mr. Malcolm Sedam's creative writing class in 1963-64 deepened my interest.

Pacific Ocean, Encinitas CA

Source

Introduction and Text of "A Salt Sea"

As an American or Innovative sonnet, the poem features free verse, a variable rhythmic scheme, and no discernible rime scheme. Using the descriptor of "movement," the commentary reveals that the poem does follow the Elizabethan three-quatrains-and-a-couplet format.

Poems that focus on spiritual subjects always employ heavy use of metaphoric imagery because there is no human language to describe the spiritual level of being. While this poem could well reveal a speaker describing her relationship with a human lover, the universality of its imagery—"listen to the ocean in your ear," "boundary of the skin," and "language you wish you could learn"— suggest that much more is at stake here than a mere human, physical relationship.

(Please note: The spelling, "rhyme," was introduced into English by Dr. Samuel Johnson through an etymological error. For my explanation for using only the original form, please see "Rime vs Rhyme: An Unfortunate Error.")

A Salt Sea

as you navigate your waters,
a salt sea pulsates your body.
a blood river meanders through it.
in the push and flow you examine your eyeball

and listen to the ocean in your ear,
but you can never find the boundary of the skin.
you never know where you should end and he might begin:
you feel you are a wave and he is the sand.

or he is a long strand of kelp and you are the forest.
maybe you are a school of fish and he is the food
they throw from the glass-bottom boat.
maybe both of you are the salt,

or he is a shark, or just a friendly dolphin
whose language you wish you could learn.

Ocean at Encinitas

Original photo by Linda Sue Grimes
Original photo by Linda Sue Grimes | Source

Commentary

This American sonnet focuses on the various metaphors that a beginning yogi might use to describe her relationship to her yogic Goal.

First Movement: Three-Quarters Water

as you navigate your waters,
a salt sea pulsates your body.
a blood river meanders through it.
in the push and flow you examine your eyeball

The human body is about three quarters water. The meditating yogi must "navigate" the churning water of the body, finding her safe vessel of stillness in order to reach the goal of meditation.

Second Movement: Speculation and Awareness

and listen to the ocean in your ear,
but you can never find the boundary of the skin.
you never know where you should end and he might begin:
you feel you are a wave and he is the sand.

The beginning yoga practitioner may have difficulty knowing if or when she has reached the various levels of awareness. So she may speculate about what those levels are.

The speaker likens those levels to physical objects; metaphorically is the only way a spiritual seeker can express the ineffable. Her first suggestion is that she might be "a wave" and the ineffable "the sand."

Third Movement: Life Comes in Pairs

or he is a long strand of kelp and you are the forest.
maybe you are a school of fish and he is the food
they throw from the glass-bottom boat.
maybe both of you are the salt,

The speaker continues her catalogue of possibilities for where she might end and the ineffable begin. She suggests pairs of "a long strand of kelp and you are the forest," a school of fish and food. She then guesses that maybe they both are the salt.

Fourth Movement: Learning the Language

or he is a shark, or just a friendly dolphin
whose language you wish you could learn.

In concluding her speculation, the speaker makes a startling suggestion and then tempers it a bit: maybe the ineffable is a shark. The sobering thought causes her to backtrack and replace the shark with a dolphin, "a friendly dolphin," by the way. And she wishes she could learn the dolphin's language—just as meditating yogis practice learning the language of their yogic Goal, the Divine Reality.

(A slightly different version of this poem under the title, "This Salt Sea," appears in my collection of poems titled Turtle Woman & Other Poems.)

At SRF Lake Shrine, Windmill Chapel

Source

© 2016 Linda Sue Grimes

Comments

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  • Maya Shedd Temple profile imageAUTHOR

    Linda Sue Grimes 

    2 years ago from U.S.A.

    Thank you, Natalie! I do love this poem, one of my favorites. It does dramatize the dilemma of a beginning yogi. I love ocean imagery. Thus I had a great time composing both the poem and the commentary.

  • Natalie Frank profile image

    Natalie Frank 

    2 years ago from Chicago, IL

    What a wonderful work. The commentary really adds to it. It is so rare that we get to see the thinking of a poet behind their own pieces. Thank you for that glimpse.

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