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Rita Dove's "My Mother Enters the Work Force"

Updated on May 19, 2018
Maya Shedd Temple profile image

After I fell in love with Walter de la Mare's "Silver" in Mrs. Edna Pickett's sophomore English class, circa 1962, poetry became my passion.

Rita Dove

Source

Introduction and Text of "My Mother Enters the Work Force"

Former U.S.A. poet laureate Rita Dove has written many fine poems, but none is more significant than her poem, " My Mother Enters the Work Force." This fine poem consists of four free verse paragraphs (versagraphs).

The poem charmingly dramatizes all the hard work the speaker's mother engaged in before she actually made enough money to afford things she needed. The poem portrays a talented woman of spunk whose determination led her to her goal.

My Mother Enters the Work Force

The path to ABC Business School
was paid for by a lucky sign:
Alterations, Qualified Seamstress
Inquire Within.
Tested on Sleeves, hers
never puckered — puffed or sleek,
Leg o' or Raglan — they barely
needed the damp cloth
to steam them perfect.

Those were the afternoons.
Evenings she took in piecework,
the treadle machine with its
locomotive whir traveling the lit path
of the needle through quicksand
taffeta or velvet deep as a forest.
And now and now sang the treadle,
I know, I know....

And then it was day again,
all morning at the office machines,
their clack and chatter
another journey — rougher,
that would go on forever
until she could break a hundred words
with no errors — ah, and then

No more postponed groceries,
and that blue pair of shoes!

Commentary

The speaker is dramatizing the irony of all the "work" her mother did before she actually "entered the work force."

First Versagraph: Before Business School

The path to ABC Business School
was paid for by a lucky sign:
Alterations, Qualified Seamstress
Inquire Within.
Tested on Sleeves, hers
never puckered — puffed or sleek,
Leg o' or Raglan — they barely
needed the damp cloth
to steam them perfect.

In the opening versagraph, the speaker describes the events that occurred before her mother became a student at the "ABC Business School." The mother became a seamstress in an "alterations" shop. It was a fortuitous occasion that her mother happened to see a sign that read, "Alterations, Qualified Seamstress Inquire Within."

The mother inquired and was "[t]ested on Sleeves." She had a natural talent because her "sleeves never puckered." No matter what style she had to sew, her work was excellent and her sleeves "barely needed the damp cloth / to steam them perfect."

Second Versagraph: Much Work, Low Pay

Those were the afternoons.
Evenings she took in piecework,
the treadle machine with its
locomotive whir traveling the lit path
of the needle through quicksand
taffeta or velvet deep as a forest.
And now and now sang the treadle,
I know, I know....

Although it was great luck that she found the job as seamstress, the downside was that the mother still had to "[take] in piecework" to make ends meet. So all evening and often into the night, the industrious mother would continue her needlework at her sewing machine with its "locomotive whir."

The speaker describes the fabrics the mother had to work with, "quicksand taffeta / or velvet deep as a forest." That she worked with such challenging materials demonstrates again the great skill that the mother possessed.

As her mother works, the speaker imagines that the machine was saying : "And now and now," and "I know, I know." These imagined thoughts seemed to be an encouragement that reminded the mother of the great goal for which she was working so tirelessly.

Third Versagraph: As a Student

And then it was day again,
all morning at the office machines,
their clack and chatter
another journey — rougher,
that would go on forever
until she could break a hundred words
with no errors — ah, and then

The third versagraph sees the mother greeting morning again, but now she is performing in her student role at the business school: "at the office machines, their clack and chatter / another journey — rougher."

This work as a student is even harder for the mother, but her determination is far stronger than the hard work. This difficult toil as a student "would go on forever / until she could break a hundred words / with no errors." Then the speaker says, "ah, and then . . . ." Once the mother has reached that technical level of skill, she could breathe a sigh of relief.

Fourth Versagraph: Things Become Affordable

No more postponed groceries,
and that blue pair of shoes!

The fourth versagraph consists of a simple couplet. Once the mother has completed her schooling and achieved those technical skills, she will be able earn enough money that she will be able to buy all the food she needs, and she will be able to afford that luxury of a "blue pair of shoes." Instead of allowing herself to purchase only the necessities of life that she has always had to settle for, now she can actually afford some luxury for herself.

Interview with Rita Dove

© 2015 Linda Sue Grimes

Comments

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  • Maya Shedd Temple profile imageAUTHOR

    Linda Sue Grimes 

    6 months ago from U.S.A.

    Noha, thanks for the response. Best of luck with your studies.

  • profile image

    Noha 

    6 months ago

    beautiful I love this explanation it would help me during answering the question of this poetry thanks alot

working

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