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Slouch-back Girl: A Poem

Updated on April 12, 2016
Dean Traylor profile image

Dean Traylor is a freelance writer and teacher. He is a former journalist who has worked on various community and college publications.

a slouch back girl
a slouch back girl | Source

About a girl who wanted to belong

Slouch-back girl

Ambles down the hall

Slouch-back girl

Doesn’t walk alone

Slouch-back girl

Hangs with the straights

Slouch-back girl

Wants to belong.


Slouch-back girl

Calls them friends

Slouch-back girl

Just a hanger-on

Slouch-back girl

Looks to the straights

Slouch-back girl

Wants to belong.


Slouch-back girl

Is not like them

Slouch-back girl

Doesn’t dress the same.

Slouch-back girl

Talks with the straights

Slouch-back girl

Wants to belong.


Slouch-back girl

With voice not loud

Slouch-back girl

Gets lost in crowds

Slouch-back girl

Not seen by the straights

Slouch-back girl

Wants to belong.


Slouch-back girl

gets the blame

Slouch-back girl

Put out her flame

Slouch-back girl

Hangs with the straights

Slouch-back girl

Wants to belong.

Source
Originally found on gophoto.
Originally found on gophoto.

What are Kennings?

The Literary Device

Kennings is a literary device from the ancient days of the “English” (we stress English because it was more Germanic is nature, considering this was the era of the Anglo-Saxons)

Whether in old, middle or modern English, the definition of this device has not changed. It is a method in which poets use two words to name an object or person. One can argue that it may have led to the formation of compound words; however, to make this claim can be premature (any linguists out there?) Most of the times, the words are nouns; however, there are some kennings are variations of nouns and other part-of-speeches.

Some examples can be found in the translation of Beowulf and the elegy, “A Wife’s Lament”. In the latter poem, there are lines such as wave-tumult used in place of sea or ocean.


The Poor, Little Inspiration

The term “Slouch-Back” refers to a teenager. She was a mousey little girl who was hunched over by a heavy backpack. She was walking with the cliques trying to hang out and have a conversation with them as if they were her friends. The girls gave her a few cordial nods, but seemingly had little or no interest in her.

She didn’t dress like them. She was bookish and unassuming and lacked the pizzazz that many popular teens have. It wouldn’t be a surprise that she didn’t have the same ambition, interests, and temperament as they did. However -- as an outside observer -- one can only speculate on the latter. The most obvious thing was that she was an outsider trying desperately to be a part of the in-crowd, despite the person she really was.

Where Popularity Breeds

Source

© 2012 Dean Traylor

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    • ziyena profile image

      ziyena 3 years ago from Southern Colorado

      I was a slouch back girl ... never belonged, but I guess a lot of girls go through that, for some they eventually they find a way to shine. Great poem! Thanks for the read :)

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