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Sprouts, The Sure Hope Of Every Gardener

Updated on October 26, 2014

A limerick lament....

"Keep well watered" it read.

The phrase fixed in my head.

The green watering can,

And the watering man,

Both hoped for rain instead.

As an impatient gardener I know what it must be to wait for the first fetal movement.

It's spring and the outdoors is calling.

The morning air is cool, even crisp.

A good friend tilled the gardens.

The soil is still spongy soft but crusting.

Lots of clay, and it is quite alkaline.

It's not good soil for blueberries.

The deer would get them anyway.

But the morning survey showed results.

Zucchini have broken ground.

Cucumbers have popped up also.

The tomato transplants survived.

The pole beans are starting their climbing.

The afternoon survey showed the first cantaloupe.

Onions and garlic are up and looking strong.

The first red strawberries taste great.

There are no blossoms yet on the raspberries.

The blackberries are even further behind.

Looking for small plums, I was surprised at their size.

The apricots are even larger and will come first.

The cherries are in their usual clusters, still small and green.

The quince, apples, peaches, and pears show.

The rhubarb is trying to go to seed before the first pie.

The grapes have started their long journey to juice and jelly.

Still hidden from sight are the spinach and chard sprouts.

The French Breakfast radishes will surprise me tomorrow.

It's spring and the outdoors is calling..



It helps to keep the goal in mind.

It takes a lot of water in a dry climate, but the results are worth the effort.
It takes a lot of water in a dry climate, but the results are worth the effort. | Source
The flowers get their share of watering, too, and the pay back is measured in beauty.
The flowers get their share of watering, too, and the pay back is measured in beauty. | Source
The grape juice starts as H20.
The grape juice starts as H20. | Source

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Copyright 2014 Demas W. Jasper All rights reserved.

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    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      O yes....it is such a lovely time ....when the newness begins....I felt as though I was walking around our old home place.

      Right now my joy are my flowering plants because I am in transition with living quarters (too long to go into)....but will have more of these lovelies making food for me soon hopefully.

      Thanks for sharing Angels are on the way to you once again today ps

    • Perspycacious profile image
      Author

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      aviannovice - When the rhubarb tries to go to seed, tear off those stems. It will keep the rhubarb able to be harvested to suit your taste buds. Eat the stems not any of the leaves.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Rhubarb was the very first thing in my neck of the woods. I can still taste the tartness in my compote. Gosh, I loved that stuff.

    • Perspycacious profile image
      Author

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      Gypsy Rose Lee - So far we have only six tomato plants planted, but plan a 30 foot row of them (or maybe two) as canning salsa is one of the goals.

      All our other efforts have been successful so far, but at least two thirds of the garden is yet to be planted. It is 84 F. right now in the shade and hotter in the sun. The mountain snow is largely melted already. When it is gone the cooler nights will be gone also. Then we start praying for Fall!

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 3 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      Delightful and you made me hungry for the harvest already. We just put in our tomatoes.

    • Perspycacious profile image
      Author

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      MsDora - Today I was greeted with the first sprouts from the spinach plantings. The radishes are sprouting, too. All is well that starts well, and fencing is up to allow the pole beans to climb, and the deer to stop tromping through the more precious parts of the gardens. Everything is newly watered except the potatoes and those will get a later-in-the-day watering. So far, so good. I'm glad you enjoyed the limerick. They are fun to do.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      I can relate to the expectations of seeing new growth. It's the way of life for the gardener. The limerick is very funny. Thank you.

    • Perspycacious profile image
      Author

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      Thanks to Ericdierker, MizBejabbers, and to BlossomSB for your greatly appreciated comments and affirmations. Watching the strawberries put out runners for new strawberry plants is almost as good as watching the robins watching the ripening strawberries. ; - )

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 3 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Now that title tricked me, I thought your hub would be about brussels sprouts! I love watching the little sprouts come up, too, and enjoyed your description.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      It is exciting to watch those first little sprouts pop through the ground. I like your limerick, too. Great stuff!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Great stuff, I am hungry!