ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Summary of King Canute on the Seashore

Updated on May 28, 2016

Summary of 'King Canute'

In this poem William Makepeace portrays the insignificant power of a king in the presence of God.The king realizes that only God is Almighty and man should worship only God.

In this ballad the poet narrates man's limited power compared to the all-powerful God.The king realizes the futility of earthly glory and bows before the Almighty God.

In the first stanza the king reflects upon his actions, while walking by the sea-shore.Usually the king was happy and gay merrily laughing.That day the king refused to laugh, or be comforted even by his wife.The official was troubled, that the king's meal was the cause.The king told him that the dinner was not the cause. Requesting to know the reason, the king replied that he was sick, tired and weary.The king's armchair was brought, and he was seated comfortably. Recalling all his past glories, the battles he had won: could be compared to no other glory. All this seemed to be in vain, for then his sons sought his death. Hence he longed for peace and a silent death.

The Bishop's consoles reminded him of the Jewish captain Joshua, who commanded the Sun to stay on upon the hill, and the Moon to stand still during the battle; whereupon these obeyed and the battle was won.

King Canute questions the Bishop, if he too could do the same.Would the advancing waves on the sea-shore obey his voice? The Bishop wrongly replied, that land and sea would obey him. So King Canute turned toward the ocean, and commanded them to get back from the shores.The ocean roared louder and the waves grew nearer, lashing on the shore. It then dawned upon king Canute that he was not the Master of the Universe.The power of his kingdoms could not give him the power over nature.

He then sternly commanded every man from thenceforth, to kneel only to God and worship and praise God alone.He never wore the golden crown since that day.

Seven Ages of Man by William Shakespear.
Seven Ages of Man by William Shakespear.
The  Infant Adored
The Infant Adored
 The Reluctant School Child
The Reluctant School Child
Sighing Like A Furnace
Sighing Like A Furnace
 The Ardent Soldier
The Ardent Soldier
The  Days of Cherished Memories.
The Days of Cherished Memories.
Full of Wise Saws
Full of Wise Saws
Reaching The Grave
Reaching The Grave

Seven Ages of Man

Summary Of Seven Ages of Man

William Shakespeare in the poem 'Seven Ages of Man' portrays the world as a stage and we the players, in which man plays several parts.

In the infant stage his acts are whimpering and puking in his nurse's arms; as a school boy he is relented to attend school..

The lover is the third stage, burning with passion and sighing, followed by the soldier with his oaths, honours and laurels at his bid; quick in quarrel, securing badges even unto death.

The fifth stage is that of justice, a stern character and full of wisdom referred to wise saws, his physique takes on a change from that of a physically fit soldier, to a man given to much appetite and less activity, thereby attaining a pot-belly, nevertheless his wisdom renders his service to others, giving good judgment.

The sixth slipping into the retired stage, with slippers and pantaloons, spectacles and a shrunk shank, all indicating the slow ageing of a man, having lost his sight, he needs a pair of spectacles; his muscles and sinews all losing strength, his childish voice reverting referred to as the second childhood. It then carries him to the last scene of all ending his strange history, which was a mystery; without teeth, eyes, and taste; thus carrying him to the end of his grave.

<script>
  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

  ga('create', 'UA-24602910-3', 'auto');
  ga('send', 'pageview');

</script>

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Anonymous 

      9 days ago

      Thank you it helped me so much for my exam

    • profile image

      Briddhi 

      12 months ago

      Very nice,

    • profile image

      ANONYMOUS 

      24 months ago

      Nice

    • profile image

      Anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Well written... certainly helped me a lot.. Thank you.

    • olgakhumlo profile imageAUTHOR

      olga khumlo 

      7 years ago from Mira Road Mumbai India

      Thank you for the boost. God bless you and your family. Have a wonderful Sunday worship.

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 

      7 years ago from Chicago

      Thank you for this pithy little Hub. Your summary is wonderfully made. Well done!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)