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The Templar Trilogy - Jack Whyte

Updated on October 3, 2014

Templar Trilogy

The Templar Trilogy represents the second series by author Jack Whyte (the first being his Arthurian "A Dream of Eagles" series). The Templar Trilogy is his fictional account of the rise and fall of the Templars, a military order of warrior monks that remain shrouded in mystery to this day.

In a manner analogous to the Masons, the Priory of Scion and other secret Orders through time, there is a mix of historical fact and wild speculation, much of which can't be separated to this day. Into this mix, Jack Whyte embarks on an ambitious fictional account of their remarkable rise to power and their abrupt fall.

The Templar Trilogy

The Rise and Fall of the Templars

The Templars were a Christian military order that has been shrouded in mystery, closely tied to the Priory of Scion (itself the subject of controversy as to whether or not it actually exists - or existed).

According to accounts, the Templars were warrior monks founded during the First Crusade in order to protect pilgrims to the Holy Land. Following their inception, the Templars were able to secure the King's stables as their base of operations. According to rumour, the Templars were able to undertake excavations of the Temple Mount in order to recover treasures and, more importantly, sacred treasures buried there.

According to history, the Templars rapidly gained prestige and power following the First Crusades and encountered a similarly abrupt end on the orders of the King of France, King Philip IV on Friday the thirteenth, 1307. On that day, the vast majority of the Templar Order were arrested, subsequently interrogated and tortured, with many of them subsequently burned at the stake.

As is the case throughout history, the victors write the history and so the Templars are condemned (rightly or wrongly) for "unspeakable practices". The truth may never be known, however, there are a number of interesting books which document the available information, coupled with speculation (for example, see "The Head of God" below).

Jack Whyte, true to his practice as exemplified by his Arthurian "A Dream of Eagles" series, has researched the time period into which he embedded his historical fiction. The first book essentially "documents" the rise of the Templar Order while the third book (which I eagerly intend to read) "documents" the fall of the Order.

One of the greatest unresolved questions associated with the Templars is the source of the power underlying their remarkable rise to power; the nature of their treasure and what finally became of it.

However history treats the Templars, they certainly had a lasting impact on society and remain the source of continued speculation.

Jack Whyte's historical novel based on the rise of the Knights Templar was very interesting reading. I find it a little more verbose than his Arthurian series but accept that writers styles evolve through time. Nonetheless, I have enjoyed reading the series and recommend it.

Templar Trilogy

This is the second series I have read by author Jack Whyte. It, again, is a very good, well written series. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

I found this series to be very interesting. Others have not (according to some reviews I have read). If you have read this series, what is your opinion? Perhaps you have simply read of the Templars and wish to recommend a book to others. Let me, and others, know.

Thanks for your response.

Reader Feedback - Voice Your Opinion!

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    • SusannaDuffy profile image

      Susanna Duffy 5 years ago from Melbourne Australia

      @Dynamic1 LM: I prefer the political intrigue to the action

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 6 years ago

      @SusannaDuffy: The "Dream of Eagles" series was very enjoyable.

      The Templar series is slightly different, with more political intrigue than action, however, another interesting series to read.

      Two other historical fiction series I really enjoyed were written by Conn Iggulden. The first "The Great Conqueror" series is based on the life of Ghengis Khan and the second, "Emperor", on Julius Caesar are both very good.

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 6 years ago

      @Petstrel LM: Yes, it was an interesting read.

      You might want to check out Jack Whyte's "Dream of Eagles" series which is a prelude to the Legend of King Arthur and Camelot.

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I really enjoyed the series and, yes, he does appear to have incorporated those books amongst his research resources

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I am just starting the first book and already, it appears that the author has incorporated the ideas of Baigent and Leigh (Holy Blood, Holy Grail) and Lomas and Knight (The Hiram Key). He also appears to have a pretty fair grasp of Freemasonry. Anyone interested in the speculative origins of Freemasonry will like this book.

    • SusannaDuffy profile image

      Susanna Duffy 7 years ago from Melbourne Australia

      I thoroughly enjoyed the Eagles series so I'd better get the Templar Trilogy ASAP

    • Petstrel LM profile image

      Petstrel LM 7 years ago

      This sounds like something I could like ...

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 7 years ago

      @aka-rms: You are very welcome! I quite enjoyed the series, as well as his Dream of Eagles (Arthur and Camelot) series.

      Thanks for your comment!

    • aka-rms profile image

      Robin S 7 years ago from USA

      These look interesting. Thanks for sharing!

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 7 years ago

      @anonymous: It is an enjoyable series, isn't it? I have read it twice and will do so again in the future.

      Have you read his "Dream of Eagles" series? Check out my Jack Whyte lens for more information. Another author I really enjoyed is Conn Iggulden and his "Great Conqueror" and "Emperor" series. You may enjoy them too.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      I'm half way through the second book and just love this series. The third one already waiting on my nightstand. Love Jack's style of writing.

    • Dynamic1 LM profile image
      Author

      Dynamic1 LM 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Thanks for your comment.

      Errors are often inherent with many historical novels (with an emphasis on "novel", rather than "historical"). The novel has been placed in a historical context and ties the characters into historical events, however, being an author of a fictional work, rather than a historical scholar, some mistakes are probable, even understandable. Despite the mistakes, I still found the Templar Series, as well as his Dream of Eagles Series, to be very enjoyable and have read each several times. In fact, I enjoyed them so much, I made these lenses so as to share them with others.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      Jack Whyte lost any historical credibility when in one of his Arthurian novels he showed a total ignorance of Welsh names by not recognizing patronymics. Now in reading Knights of the Black and White his characters call Saul of Taursus a gentile! I see his writing as mere fantasy having liitle to do with historical fact.