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The Legend of Shep

Updated on December 15, 2012

Shep Memorial

A statue of Shep in Fort Benton Montana sculpted by artist Bob Scriver
A statue of Shep in Fort Benton Montana sculpted by artist Bob Scriver | Source

Based on the true story of Shep

Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his canine companion
The bond never dies once trust’s realized
In the cold and the dark nights they brave


A herder once lived not too many years ago
In a town in a river oasis
His dog Shep by his side his friend and his pride
Provider, protector, defender


Many miles of dust they traveled as a pair
Taking care to safeguard their flock
The town that lay below the scalding plains and frigid snow
Was their oasis to rest and refresh


As the years ground by their love did grow
A union ‘tween friends and companions
From no danger would Shep hide, he was always by the side
Of his master, his friend and his brother


Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his loyal companion
The time spent together, through all kinds of weather
In the light and darkness they slaved


Spring of life came and went, and the summer came to set
On the seasons of their time together
When autumn waited at the sill, the herder fell ill
And so began Shep’s weary winter


It must have tortured ole Shep as his masters health waned
There was nothing the two legs could do
illness ravaged the man as if his end had been planned
Til death had taken Shep's master


As they prepared the mans remains to be sent to the east
To some relatives he had distant family
In a casket he was lain his body taken to the train
Shep whining and crying beside him


Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his loyal companion
Shep never left his side, not even when he died
He’d have followed him right to the grave


The conductor for the train took the casket on board
But he’d not let the old sheep dog follow
So Shep sat track-side with his canine eyes wide
As his master and friend left forever.


The days came and went as the trains did too
And ever was Shep there to greet them
A dog knows not of forever, so he waited to be together
With the master that had been stolen from him.


The sun turned to rain as the seasons began to move
Yet every train in at the station
Was met by a friend, whom hours did spend
Waiting for the man he'd been missing

Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his loyal companion
The months stretched to years and still he shed tears
In the cold and dark lonely he braves


The years rolled on as Shep greeted every train
That pulled in to Fort Benton Station
The months turned to years as he shed silent tears
Hoping this train would be the one bringing


5 years passed by as he waited at the tracks
His fame had spread cross a nation
In a time of depression it gave a stark lesson
To believe in something far greater


People sent out food from London and New York
To keep Shep the watcher well healthy
Four times a day he’d wait and he’d pray
That his master would be on the next train


Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his loyal companion
The bond hasn’t died, no matter the tears cried
Though the master's in a cold lonely grave


Well time took its toll and ole Shep began to age
His hearing and eyesight grew faded
They say he didn’t hear the train as it drew near
As he waited for his herder to return


When he finally saw the train he started to move
With a body time had broken
His old legs did fail and he slipped upon the rail
And he ended his 5 year long vigil


Shep had gone to unite with the man that he loved
Reunited, together, forever
But the legend still remains of the herder and the trains
And the dog who remembered forever


Can anyone know how deep the bond goes
Between a man and his loyal companion
The bond never dies not even when they lie
In their cold and dark lonely graves

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