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The Novel Editing Process From Start to Finish

Updated on April 1, 2015

In Response to a Request

From my friend Audrey:

“Great article Bill! And poetry makes even less money than articles do! I would be very interested in an article addressing your editing process in depth--first pass through, second pass through etc--and how to keep perspective as you go through that process.”

I’ve never met a request I could refuse so Audrey, this one’s for you.

Before I respond to Audrey’s question, though, remember that I’m simply sharing with you my editing process. I’m sure many of you have a different process and that’s wonderful. If you’d like to share that process in the comment section then feel free. I really believe that writers can learn from each other through that kind of sharing, so I encourage you to do so.

With that qualifier out of the way, allow me to tell you how I edit my novels.

Five edits and I still found two errors....sigh!
Five edits and I still found two errors....sigh! | Source

One More Point to Make Before We Begin

I think it’s important to differentiate between the types of editing. We edit for grammatical errors. We edit for flow and voice. We edit for storyline. We edit our characters and we edit our scenes. I’ll be mentioning all of these in this article and I didn’t want you to think they were all the same thing.

Now let’s begin.

I’ve mentioned before the process I use to write a novel. My first draft is simply the telling of the bare-roots story. I do no editing in that draft. I simply follow my mental outline, make sure I keep the story flowing smoothly, and arrive at the ending without editing at all.

My second draft is for filling in the guts of the story. Here is where I develop my characters in more detail, and I make the scenes come alive. Still no editing is done during this second draft. If all goes according to plan, I basically complete the book by the end of this second draft.

Now it’s time to edit.

First Edit

My first edit is a read-through, catching as many grammatical errors as possible. I also correct as many “story flaws” as I can at this time. I read the manuscript out loud so I can hear it. I find this helps me determine if the flow is the way I want it.

When I’m all done with this first edit I force myself to leave the manuscript alone. I find it is quite easy to “get too close” to my own work. Remember, by this time, I’ve been working on this book for about six months. I need to step back and get some objective feedback from my beta readers.

Find other writes who will serve as beta readers for you
Find other writes who will serve as beta readers for you | Source

Beta Readers

What is a beta reader? They are trusted friends who agree to read my manuscript and give me their honest opinions. I do not want them wasting their time on grammar. I simply want to know if they find the story enjoyable and if they see any major flaws in the story. This is vital because by this time in the process I cannot see errors in the story.

A word about beta readers: choose people you trust who will give you helpful suggestions. Why trust? Well, besides the fact that there are unscrupulous people out there who will steal your work, you need people who are willing to be truthful with you. It does no good to just pick people who will tell you that your work is fantastic. That may be nice for your ego but it doesn’t help you to have a finished product that is worthy of publishing.

Approach people and give them a deadline. We don’t want this process dragging out for weeks. Ask them if they can do this for you in two weeks. If they can’t that’s fine, but try to find readers who understand there are time constraints. Offer to be a beta reader for them should they ever write a book. Give and take…it’s what the writing community is all about.

Next Edit

Your beta readers come through for you and they send back suggestions. Now it’s time to take their suggestions and incorporate them into your story….if you choose to do so.

That qualifying statement is important. Remember that this is your book. You are under no obligation to take suggestions and make them reality. Take a look at each suggestion and determine whether you can live with that change. Obviously, if someone has found a hole in the logic of your story, it would be advisable to follow their suggestion.

And Now It’s Time for a Real Editor

When I’ve finished with the suggestions given to me by the beta readers I am finally at the point where I turn over my manuscript to a professional editor.

Yes, this costs money. Best case scenario, for a full-length novel, this will cost you between $500 and $1,000. I’m sorry to be the one to tell you that.

That means you need to make a decision because let’s face it, most of us don’t have that kind of cash available. Ask yourself this question: is it worth it to me to pay that much for an editor? If you are going to self-publish as an ebook, chances are the answer is no. Most writers cannot afford this step and believe me, I get it.

An alternative is to have a writing friend do this for you and you agree to edit their book when the time comes.

Whatever you decide to do, I do think it is vital that someone else edit your book. I’ll say this as clearly as possible and I hope I don’t offend anyone: a writer who final-edits their own book has a fool for a client.

If you are planning on submitting your book to an agent or a publisher, this step is crucial. I can think of nothing worse than querying a professional agent or publisher about a book that has grammatical errors in it. You will simply look like a fool and ruin your credibility with that professional.

Editing avoids this
Editing avoids this | Source

Last Step in the Process

You get your book back from the editor and now it is time to make changes based on that final edit. Make those changes….unless it is a change you can’t live with, in which case ignore it.

Finally, I read the book one more time, out loud, with another person listening. This is the final read-through and I want another pair of ears hearing what I hear. How does it sound? Is the flow good? Is the voice good?

If everything goes smoothly on that read-through, I am done with the editing and it is time to bring that book to life.

Let Me Repeat

Again, this is my process. It works for me. Will it work for you? I have no idea and I’m not suggesting it to any of you. All I can do is share my experience and my approach and hopefully you’ll find it useful.

Audrey, thank you so much for the question. I hope you find this answer satisfying and helpful.

To the rest of you, best wishes should you decide to write a book. I find it to be very satisfying. I’m proud of the three novels I’ve written, and you should be proud of any book you have created. There are few of us in the world who can do this, so pat yourself on the back for a job well-done.

2015 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pamela, thank you so much. I am driven. No doubt about that. I was raised to seek perfection while always understanding that it couldn't be attained. :)

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 2 years ago from United States

      I think this hub will help many writers. The very fact that you have thought carefully and have come up with a process of editing speaks volumes for the quality of your writing. I am always amazed how I can write something that is only a couple of pages, read it out loud and still find a spelling or grammatical error. It takes a lot of work to strive for perfection, but you obviously are not afraid of the hard work. The results prove how worthwhile your process works of you. Excellent hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for stopping by, Glimmer, and Happy Mother's Day to you.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      I think it would be incredibly interesting to be an editor or beta reader. I'm just not an expert grammar person (even though my husband will tell you that I think I am). Very helpful steps for prospective writers.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Deb. I've heard of quite a few techniques. Whatever works for the individual writer is the right way. :) Have a great weekend in OK.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Your rules for writing a novel sounds good, definitely tried and true. I would imagine not everyone's process will be the same, but I would think that they would be pretty close. Thanks again for sharing your secrets.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Mark! Hopefully it will help your friend.

    • Mark Lees profile image

      Mark Lees 2 years ago

      A vey interesting look at your process. I have sent it to a friend who is in the editing process at the moment and asks me for advice half a dozen times a week. Hope it clears a lot of the questions up for them.

      Voted up

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you PS and Happy Easter my friend.

      The paid editor part is not doable for most writers and if that is the case then we just make do with what we've got and hope for the best.

      Have a wonderful day, PS. Blessings and hugs heading your way.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you drbj. I appreciate it. Thanks for stopping by for a visit.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Sounds like a workable plan, Bill, that would yield desired results.

      That old saying 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' comes to mind. Rather than having to fumble around trying to find something that works, using this model and tweaking along the why if absolutely necessary would get the job done.

      The part I was surprised (not sure why) by was hiring a professional editor at the end. I can see the importance of that, really. It certainly would give honest feedback that may mean the difference between success and failure...I understand the beta readers are in the loop too but paid editor will have different eyes as they read.

      Some day ..I may undertake this. Plate's a bit full right now.

      Wishing you much success not that you need it.

      Sending Angels and hugs to you and yours ps

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 2 years ago from south Florida

      You can pat yourself on the back more than a few times for this excellent information about the editing process, Bill. Very, very well done.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for sharing, Peggy W, and Happy Easter to you and your loved ones. I appreciate you.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Bill,

      A neighbor of mine and someone else I know has aspirations of writing a book. Will definitely share your article with them and will also share it with a wider audience here on HP, twitter and G+. Your method sounds like a good one to me! Thanks for sharing your expertise with us!

      Happy Easter to you and Bev.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Maria, thank you so much and Happy Easter to you. Nice job hiring Shauna.....a smart move all around on that one. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, and have a blessed weekend.

      love,

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I agree with you Flourish. I have two such readers and they do a marvelous job.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Suhail. I do think many can benefit from this system of editing.

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 2 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

      Dear Bill,

      As a writer, editor and teacher, this post is golden to me - will be sharing far and wide - and individually with clients as well, as I agree 1000%.

      In this community, we are so blessed to have such talent among us. I recently hired Shauna to be my editor and sing her praises to the rooftops!

      I have kindly turned clients away (learning from you) - encouraging them first to have a group of beta readers, after I read a sampling of their work.

      Wishing you and Bev a peaceful and blessed Easter weekend, dear friend.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      A detail oriented beta reader can be very valuable in catching inconsistencies. Your method makes sense.

    • Suhail and my dog profile image

      Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent 2 years ago from Mississauga, ON

      Awesome advice and I am sure it will be very useful for me when my time comes.

      Btw, it is your process, but it makes sense for everyone.

      Finally, the process involving real editor could become proverbial last nail in the coffin for aspirants like me.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia. I appreciate it, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brian, I have never heard of it, but I'm going to Google it this morning. Thanks for the tip.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, there are definitely some good people here at HP. The trick is finding them, but once you do they have your back all the way. They are why I'm still here, and that includes you. Thank you!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Thank you, bill. I'll happily send you a signed copy!

      Ann

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for sharing the interesting and useful information, Bill. The process of writing and editing a novel that you describe sounds like a great plan.

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 2 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      I like your novel writing and editing process. It makes very good sense.

      I recently learned about and am intrigued by (without having tried it yet) a process of preparing to write the first draft. It is called the snowflake method and is based on the analogy of a snowflake fractal. Supposedly the method reveals structural flaws before the beginning is begun, avoiding having them become apparent many chapters into the first draft.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      You have never steered us wrong so there's no reason to believe you would now ;). Your process is flawless and seems a perfect road to take. I have been fortunate to have a wonderful writer here on HP doing grammar and punctuation for me. Of course I'm only on Chapter Four, on HP at least.

      Sha is definitely on my list for future help. Thank you, as always, for your help and direction.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, shared and G+

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Dora. I don't know many writers who can afford professional editing, so it's kind of a Catch 22 for most. There are alternative strategies but it takes some time to find them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, thank you! Editing is a painful process for some writers. For me, it is the culmination of a long journey. It is the final step where clarification arrives, and I actually enjoy it.

      Blessings always, Michael!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 years ago from The Caribbean

      Bill, I appreciate your explanation on the various stages of editing. The cost of the final edit may not be good news, but I suppose it tests serious dedication to excellence. Thanks for the information.

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 2 years ago

      Wonderfully put together a painful process of editing which fills with joy and pleasure everyone involved. My heartfelt gratitude goes simultaneously to you Mr. William Holland and to your friend Audrey -(without a question there might not be an answer ),- for showing clear and much easier unknown path ahead of any writer who decides to dare reaching for the stars.

      Voted awesome.

      Blessings peace and prosperity, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pawpa, there is no doubt about it. I won't be using a professional editor for my latest book, and I admit to some trepidation because of it.

    • Pawpawwrites profile image

      Jim 2 years ago from Kansas

      I found it very interesting to read about your editing process. It is very helpful to see how other people do things. That investment in an editor is a big decision.....and a hard one.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alan, I suspect the animal magnetism is a thing of the past. Oh, how the mighty have fallen. :) Thanks for sharing about your editing your own work....I know there are some who do it and do it well. Unfortunately, I'm not one of them. :)

      Have a superb end of the week.

      Bill

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan R Lancaster 2 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      (not too far down this time; what's the matter Bill, animal magnetism fading?)

      Useful and interesting. Until I get to the bottom line, the bucks don't even start here. Some of us have bills - you get in everywhere - to pay. I do my own editing, grammar, storyline, (spelling comes in the writing stage). My Beta readers buy my books, and I'd soon know if they didn't read well. Haven't had any tell me they don't want the next in the series - could be something to do with Ivar Ulfsson's sexual antics.

      Keep up the good work, Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Bill. LIke you say, each will have their own way, and this one works well for me.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Melissa, I think it would be darned near impossible for a beta reader to give good input without reading the whole manuscript....but what the heck do I know? :) Thanks for being here.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I don't know, Deb. I know other writers who edit as they go. It just doesn't work for me, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. If you find it easier to do your way then that's the way you should do it. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    • Homeplace Series profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Great starting guide for anyone seriously thinking of writing a book. Each will have their own way, but you have mapped a very effective process. Thanks, again, for sharing - to help us spread our wings and fly!! ;-)

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 2 years ago from Minnesota

      Thanks for detailing the editing process you go through, Bill! I find it very helpful to learn about the different methods each author uses. Some people use their friends and family for beta readers while others find writers groups (meeting in person or online). But, as you mentioned, you have to be careful who you share it with since you most likely haven't copyrighted it at that point! I've heard some people only share portions of a novel and not the whole thing, but I would think it would be hard for a beta reader to give real feedback unless they could read the full novel.

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 2 years ago from Iowa

      I wish I could write a draft straight through without editing, but I always end up editing as I go. Which makes for a much longer drafting process. Thanks for sharing your process with us. I have an idea I've been working on for my second novel, and when I finally sit down to write it up, I would love to be able to get all the way through the first draft without editing.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad you found it useful, Audrey. I'm happy I was actually able to answer the question. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Larry! I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, all solid words of wisdom, but I expect that. I think it is vitally important to walk away from the draft for a while. Let the mind clear and then see it after a week or so. It really is helpful.

      Thank you Heidi!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carolyn, I'm glad you find this useful and I look forward to reading that first novella of yours. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm happy to hear that Venkatachari M....thank you so much, and blessings to you always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I have no doubt you have a book in you. I hope it breaks free one day because you are an exceptional writer.

      And I expect a signed copy of it when it is published. :)

      Bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, I know some writers who edit the first draft. I might as well not even write the first draft if I'm going to edit it.....but that's just me. Anyway, thanks for your kind words, dear friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm glad, Eric. Thanks for stopping by and hopefully, one day, you'll be able to use this.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 2 years ago from California

      Thank you for answering this question Bill--This seems a sensible and efficient approach. I tend to get lost a bit in this process--hence my question

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      Great overview of this overwhelming process.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      Totally agree that getting "no men" (instead of "yes men") to be beta readers can be very helpful. I think the most important step is making sure the betas know why they are editing. If they are friends, they may think that you are looking for "reviews" of the work which is a completely different activity.

      A good editor WILL cost money. Just part of process. And whether you use an official editor or not, put the draft away for a few days before looking at it for another round of edits.

      Good stuff, as always. Voted up, useful and sharing!

    • CarolynEmerick profile image

      Carolyn Emerick 2 years ago

      Hi Billy, thanks for taking the time to share all your useful tips with us. I will definitely be returning to your hubs in the future when my first novella is finished and ready for editing! Upvoted!

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 2 years ago from Hyderabad, India

      Very useful tips for editing books. You have done it so descriptively as to be clear even to freshers. Thanks for sharing.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      I never tire of reading your editing process or thoughts on this subject. We need reminding of what these things entail and the time it takes to carry through. I'll be happy when I get to the stage of editing at all!

      Have a great Wednesday, bill!

      Ann :)

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      You are such a wonderful teacher and you share so freely. Your editing process is quite structured and easy enough for anyone to follow. I like the idea of writing the first draft without worrying about errors - just letting the thoughts flow.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Wow I sure learned a lot. Really interesting stuff here. Thanks

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Frank, you did say it and I, in turn, appreciate it very much. Thanks, buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Pamela, for sharing part of your process. We all learn from each other and that's why I write these articles.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Carol! You are lucky to be able to trade off for a reading...great deal if you ask me. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You got it, DJ! You are well on your way. LOL

      Have a great Hump Day!

      Bill

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      very helpful, and I'm sure our dear virtual Mutual friend will agree Billybuc... teaching may be the most important skill we humans possess.. and you do it very well and succinctly.. you just show all of us a whole new level of writing successfully... there I said it and I admit it..:)

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 2 years ago from United States

      I like your process of editing. I read my articles out loud for the freelance writing I do, because invariably I will find at least one error, if not more. I put the book on the back burner as my home responsibilities have increased over the past several months. My son wrote a book, and he got a couple of friends to read it first, then he paid a "real" editor. I think it was worthwhile, even though it is tough to come up with the fee. I'm sure this article will help the writers who are now working on their first book.l Good luck to you and continued success with your books.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 2 years ago from Arizona

      It is that moment of reckoning when you say done and move forward. I was lucky to find a professional editor and we are trading for an Astrology reading. We do miss the forest for the trees when we try our own editing. This is a great hub and I am voting up and all the stuff I forgot.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      All great advice, here.

      I'm afraid I simply do not have THAT many friends.

      I see I should start to work getting people indebted to me.

      Let's see, there's blackmail, extortion, feigned illness, and threats.

      Yes, I think I see where you're coming from. :-)

      DJ.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that MizB! I'm with you on the editing issue. I read constantly, and I will never return to an author who has not edited properly. My money is too important to me to waste it on someone who obviously does things halfway.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Sha! It's always helpful to hear how others do things in this business. It sounds like you are quite thorough in your approach....if anyone is listening....HIRE SHA!!!!!!!

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 2 years ago

      Bill, this is a good helpful article, my friend, and I can't find any flaws in your reasoning. You are lucky to have beta readers you can trust. Believe me, they are not readily available. I have a colleague who sometimes reads my short stories or articles, and she always returns them with a mark or two on the page, like a comma I've overlooked or a word change. She is a retired English teacher, so I've always used her suggestions. However, this busy woman would never sit for a full novel.

      The biggest criticism I see on comments on ebooks on websites is that the book is poorly edited or unedited. Anyone trying to break into the book publishing business by self-publishing an ebook still needs to invest the money in an editor. I get the free ones and the 99 cent ebooks for my Kindle, but I won't buy a more expensive book by a new author unless I find his or her books to be decently edited. That includes for content as well as typos and grammatical errors. A reader can take only so many old trite phrases before he or she puts the book down for good. Voted up and I hope this gets many reads.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      Your process makes complete sense, Bill. By the time the manuscript is presented to the editor, most of the grammatical issues should be cleaned up. It's a tad distracting to edit a piece of work that's full of spelling, grammatical, and punctuation errors. I usually do two passes for my clients. The first addresses spelling and grammar, with comments regarding flow, inconsistencies, and apparent holes in the story. Once the author has implemented the changes they choose to keep and has addressed any comments/suggestions, they return the ms to me for a final pass. Here I ensure it flows and shines. I go through each pass twice before turning it over to the client to make sure I haven't missed something and that the changes read smoothly without changing the author's voice. It's crucial an editor does not mess with the author's voice. At least that's the way I approach the editing process.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for sharing that, Kristen. We do what we can on our own for sure. Few of us have the money for a professional editor.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good for you, Jamie. It sounds, to me, like you have your act together and are headed in the right direction. Good luck to you, and thanks for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Janine, and thanks coming back atcha. Happy Wednesday!

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 2 years ago from Northeast Ohio

      Great hub, Bill. I love my beta reader that I've had for one year. My mother read my ms before she passed away last year. I wish I can afford to hire a real editor. But I do what I can on my own. (I'll be doing two post-conference hubs on editing and powerful prose soon.) Voted up!

    • jhamann profile image

      Jamie Lee Hamann 2 years ago from Reno NV

      Good morning Bill, great hub! It is funny that I just noticed errors in the hub I just published and I quickly fixed them. My mom just offered to read my manuscripts, I feel that I am taking a huge first step, I have everything collected and I continue to edit and I have finally found a good solid reader. Thank you for your advice and I hope you have a great day. Jamie

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      Thank you so much, Bill for sharing your editing process with us and most definitely appreciate it. Have a wonderful Wednesday now, my friend! ;)