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My Top 10 Favorite Books

Updated on June 19, 2013

From the list below, which book are you interested in reading?

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Reading is very important in a person's education development. Difficult words are learned. Sentence structure and transitions are picked up. My life is about words: reading and writing. For a reader to pick their top 10 favorites is no easy task. I compiled a list of really my 10 most memorable books.

A few of these books are basic school assigned readings, but they are good reads for those who Sparknoted. :)

These books have taught me lessons about strength and the inner turmoils that everyone faces. No one is truly alone in the world. No experience is truly unique. My comfort comes from books. I enjoy World War II, specifically Holocaust, books as well.

1. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

"Things Fall Apart tells two intertwining stories, both centering on Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first, a powerful fable of the immemorial conflict between the individual and society, traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world. The second, as modern as the first is ancient, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo's world with the arrival of aggressive European missionaries. These perfectly harmonized twin dramas are informed by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul."

-Amazon.com

2. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger

"Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger's New Yorker stories particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme, With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is fully of children. The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep."

-Amazon.com

3. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

One of my favorite books. It is deliciously dark and keeps you reading to see all the reasons. Very well written.

"Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker - his classmate and crush - who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah's voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he'll find out why. Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah's pain, and learns the truth about himself-a truth he never wanted to face."

- Amazon.com

4. Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead

In a vampire infested world, this book is the true gem of all the books. If you loved Twilight, you will divorce it for Vampire Academy. It is world about vampires just as complex as the human world.

"After two years on the run, best friends Rose, half-human/half-vampire, and Lissa, a mortal vampire princess, are caught and returned to St. Vladimir's Academy. Up until then, Rose had kept Lissa safe from her enemies; school, however, brings both girls additional challenges and responsibilities. How they handle peer pressure, nasty gossip, new relationships, and anonymous threats may mean life or death. Likable narrator Rose hides doubts about her friend behind a tough exterior; orphan Lissa, while coping with difficult emotional issues such as depression and survivor's guilt, uses her emerging gifts for good. Mead's absorbing, debut YA novel, the first in a new series, blends intricately detailed fantasy with a contemporary setting, teen-relevant issues, and a diverse, if sometimes sterotyped, cast of supporting characters. Occasional steamy sex and a scattering of vulgar language demand mature readers, but teens able to handle the edgy elements will speed through this vamp story and anticipate the next installment"

-Amazon.com

5. I am Legend by Richard Matheson

It's really short and NOTHING like the movie. Another vampire book (I took a vampire literature class, so...)

"Robert Neville may well be the last living man on Earth . . . but he is not alone.

An incurable plague has mutated every other man, woman, and child into bloodthirsty, nocturnal creatures who are determined to destroy him.

By day, he is a hunter, stalking the infected monstrosities through the abandoned ruins of civilization. By night, he barricades himself in his home and prays for dawn.... "

-Amazon.com

6. The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Really good book, don't watch the movie.

"The searing, postapocalyptic novel destined to become Cormac McCarthy's masterpiece.A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food-—and each other.The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, "each the other's world entire," are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation."

-Amazon.com

7. 50 Shades of Grey by E.L. James

I know you were waiting for this on the list. It is ACTUALLY a really good book with a great plot line. The sex in the book is actually very important to Christian's character. If you love to read, this is a book to try.

"When literature student Anastasia Steele goes to interview young entrepreneur Christian Grey, she encounters a man who is beautiful, brilliant, and intimidating. The unworldly, innocent Ana is startled to realize she wants this man and, despite his enigmatic reserve, finds she is desperate to get close to him. Unable to resist Ana’s quiet beauty, wit, and independent spirit, Grey admits he wants her, too—but on his own terms.

Shocked yet thrilled by Grey’s singular erotic tastes, Ana hesitates. For all the trappings of success—his multinational businesses, his vast wealth, his loving family—Grey is a man tormented by demons and consumed by the need to control. When the couple embarks on a daring, passionately physical affair, Ana discovers Christian Grey’s secrets and explores her own dark desires.

Erotic, amusing, and deeply moving, the Fifty Shades Trilogy is a tale that will obsess you, possess you, and stay with you forever.

This book is intended for mature audiences."

-Amazon.com

Read my review about this book!

8. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

"It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul."

-Amazon.com


9. The Boy in Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

So sad. The movie is good as well.

"Berlin 1942

When Bruno returns home from school one day, he discovers that his belongings are being packed in crates. His father has received a promotion and the family must move from their home to a new house far far away, where there is no one to play with and nothing to do. A tall fence running alongside stretches as far as the eye can see and cuts him off from the strange people he can see in the distance.

But Bruno longs to be an explorer and decides that there must be more to this desolate new place than meets the eye. While exploring his new environment, he meets another boy whose life and circumstances are very different to his own, and their meeting results in a friendship that has devastating consequences."

-Amazon.com

10. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

A truly inspiring story about strength, family, and first love. She voices the thoughts of all teenage girls.

"Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank's remarkable diary has since become a world classic -- a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the "Secret Annex" of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short."

-Amazon.com

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    • clairewait profile image

      clairewait 4 years ago from North Carolina

      I'm not sure I would consider all the books in that list of the "teen" reading persuasion. (50 Shades?!) Your first two, while popular HS English class reads, also not written FOR teens... you've got a good mix. No teen book disclaimer needed here.

      For Holocaust reads, I suggest Night (Elie Weisel) and Sarah's Key (Tatiana de Rosenay). Both quick reads, but by no means simple. Good list.

    • HLKeeley profile image
      Author

      HL Keeley 4 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      Haha I will change that...thank you...I also enjoyed Night

    • mattdigiulio profile image

      mattdigiulio 4 years ago

      Oh, this is so awesome. I'm bookmarking this. I haven't read ANY of these. I have long wanted to read "The Road". Voting up, you're too funny.

    • HLKeeley profile image
      Author

      HL Keeley 4 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      The Road was amazing! It was a school issued book, but so glad I read it! The movie put me to sleep though. A very good example of why some books are not made to be movies :)

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