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The Voices part 2

Updated on December 10, 2014
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This is a sequel to another story I wrote called "The Voices".

“Tomorrow,” Lizzy thought staring out the window into the crisp morning. “Always tomorrow.” She took a sip of her coffee as she began to pace he room.

She looked at the bright white wall of the room and shivered. Too much white. She walked back over to the window hoping to hear a bird in its morning song, but just like the flowers in the unkempt garden, the air was dead outside. Not even the wind blew.

She paced again, shuffling her feet just to make a noise. She took another sip of her coffee and frowned. It was already cold. It was never warm enough to last. She gave a slight groan as she placed her cup down on the bedside table screwed down to the floor. She hated cold coffee.

“Why not today?” the other person in the room asked.

She gave a nervous glance in his direction, but other than that she continued to ignore that he was there.

“Who is that man to tell you whether or not you’re ready? He’s human just like you, fully capable of making mistakes,” he said.

She pressed her lips together trying to hold her tongue.

“Let’s break free of these chains and fly away,” he continued.

Lizzy gave a slight shake of her head and walked back towards the window. She really wished she could hear a bird.

“If we wait any longer our souls will be as dead as those flowers.”

She furred her brows and turned her back, angling her view out the window so she couldn’t see him out of the corner of her eye.

“You know I’m right,” he continued.

Again she didn’t respond, she merely rolled her shoulders and shifted nervously where she stood.

He began to tap his fingers in the armrest of her chair and his foot on the ground, the unwelcomed sound resonating off of the walls.

Lizzy tried not to let the sudden, repetitive noise bother her.

“I’m not ready,” she thought trying to focus her breathing. “I need to get better. Then I will be ready. I get better every day. Tomorrow I will be better than today and the next day I will be better than tomorrow.”

Several minutes had passed before she realized that the brunette woman had entered the room. It wasn’t until the brunette laughed that mockingly, vicious laugh that she noticed her.

She whirled around to face the both of them, her anxiety rising.

“You look surprised to see me,” the brunette said.

“You shouldn’t be here,” she replied. “Both of you should leave.”

The brunette grinned. “Lizzy,” she said causing her to cringe, “we are your friends. Why wouldn’t we be here for you? You are in obvious need of guidance.”

Lizzy shook her head. “No,” she replied. “Not from you. Not from either of you.”

The man chuckled. “At least she acknowledges you,” he said. “She ignores me.”

Lizzy turned back towards the window, her only view of freedom, and shut her eyes. “Please leave,” she whispered harshly. “I can get through this on my own.”

The other two laughed.

“Did you hear that, Tessa?” the man asked.

“I certainly did, George,” the brunette replied standing up from the arm of the chair which she sat. She took the sides of the dress she was wearing and swished it back and forth making a ‘swooshing’ sound; a sweet gesture unbefitting of he, just like the vibrant color of her dress. She walked over to Lizzy and gently stroked her hair. “It’s funny though,” she said, “she has never been able to take care of anyone. Not herself and definitely not her baby.”

Lizzy blindly batted Tessa’s hand away and moved her hair to the front. “Don’t talk about my baby,” she said angrily. “You have no right.”

“Tsk,” Tessa said scowling. “All we have ever wanted was to help you.” She leaned against the wall next to the window trying to catch Lizzy’s eye.

“You have never helped me,” Lizzy replied.

Lizzy heard George’s expensive dress shoes move across the floor. “Have never helped you?” he repeated, a slight hiss in his voice. “We have always been there for you when needed someone!” he went on. “We were the only ones that cared when your parents cut you off, when your uncle got a little too friendly and when that man took advantage of you.”

Lizzy glanced sheepishly over her shoulder, but dared not to meet his eyes.

“We are the ones that give you the courage and strength to do things that you never would have dreamed possible on your own,” George said continuing. “We are the ones that come to your aide when everyone else would walk by you as you cry, alone in the dark.”

“We are the ones that save you,” Tessa added, whispering softly in Lizzy’s ear. “We always have been.”

Lizzy shook her head again. “No, please leave me alone.” Her lip quivered and she struggled to keep the tears from falling. “I’m stronger now. I can do things on my own.”

Again, the two of them laughed.

“Stronger,” Tessa repeated mockingly. “Those tears you have going down your face would suggest otherwise.”

“Looks like big girls do cry,” George said as he twirled his bowl hat on his finger, a malicious grin on his face.

Lizzy furred her brows and turned to glare at him. “All you have ever done is hurt me,” she said. “They took my baby away from me because of you two.”

They tried not to laugh.

“You never could take a joke,” Tessa said.

“Always taking everything so literally,” George answered.

Lizzy turned back towards the window and wished more than anything she could turn into a bird herself and fly away. She took a deep breath and pressed her hand on the thick glass.

She felt their hands res on either one of her shoulders.

“Come on, Lizzy,” Tessa said in a pouty voice. “You know that all we have ever wanted was for you to be happy.”

George gave her shoulder a slight squeeze. “And maybe a little fun,” he added.

Lizzy heard Tessa hit George.

“Listen,” Tessa began, “the point is no one has ever cared for you like we have. When others though you were crazy we knew they were just scared of how different and special you are.”

Lizzy rolled her shoulders trying to shake their hands off. “I was crazy. I am crazy,” she replied in a distant voice.

“No,” Tessa said. “You are exceptional. You see things that no one else can. You know things that no one else knows.” Tessa turned Lizzy around so she would look at her. “You are so far beyond everyone else that they fear you.”

Lizzy felt a shiver run down her spine.

George began pacing the room and fiddling with his golden lighter. “You are a goddess among peasants, Lizzy,” he said.

Lizzy’s eyes darted from one to the other. She could feel her head buzzing as they continued to talk to her and she took a deep breath the level to calm herself.

Tessa smiled back at her, her strange glistening eyes shining into Lizzy’s.

“I just want to get better,” Lizzy whispered. “I was getting better.” She glanced down at her arms slightly frowning as she saw the scars left from the errors of her past.

Tessa lifted an eyebrow as she glanced at Lizzy’s arms, too. “That’s the reason we told you to switch to crack,” she said. “And it had worked. A great high with less physical evidence of its use.”

Lizzy shrugged Tessa’s hands off of her. “I am getting better,” she said turning once again towards the viewless window. “Where are the damn birds,” she thought.

Tessa and George laughed, the cruel grating sound reverberating off of the already obnoxious walls.

“There is nothing to get better form, Lizzy,” George said sparking his lighter and closing it again. “Be smart about this.”

“They have been lying to you,” Tessa added nodding. “They have been forcing pills down your throat for no other reason than they want to hinder you greatness.”

“You say you are getting better, but from what? How?” George asked. “I see no change in you other than your new found obstinacy. Better would mean something positive and obstinacy is not a positive thing at all.”

Lizzy shook her head.

“How can you be sure that the sickness they say you are suffering from isn’t made up?” George continued. “An over embellished ruse to control you?”

Yes,” Tessa agreed nodding. “They don’t want you to be able to think or feel for yourself. They want to mold your mind and body into the same shape as everyone else. Boring, lifeless and utterly lame.”

Lizzy pressed the palm of her hand to her forehead and squeezed her eyes shut. “Stop it!” she hissed. “I can’t do any of the things that you said. My mind was just playing tricks on me!”

“But what about us, Lizzy?” Tessa asked pouting once again.

“Yes, do you not hear us when we speak?” George added. “Do you not feel us when we touch you?”

“Are we a trick?” Tessa continued.

Lizzy sniffed. “The mind is a mysterious thing,” she explained. “I saw and felt what I wanted to believe, what I wanted to be real. Bu you’re not real! I know you are not real!”

There was a brief silence between them.

“If you don’t want us here now,” George began lighting a cigar, “then why don’t you just imagine us away?”

“Imagine us away,” Tess repeated huffing. “What a ridiculous notion.” She brushed back a fallen piece of hair.

“Maybe it’s because you still need us,” George said taking a puff and pushing a cloud of smoke out of his mouth.

Lizzy opened her eyes and glanced at the single crow pecking on the ground of the pathetic garden. “I was getting better,” she whispered as a single tear fell down her cheek.

“Awe!” Tessa said kissing Lizzy’s cheek. “There is ample time to get ‘better’,” she said. “But there’s not always enough time to have fun!”

“Agreed!” George said through his cigar.

“Get better tomorrow!” Tessa said taking Lizzy’s hands in her. “But today I think we should bash in the head of that one orderly like we did to that doctor that one time. You know, the orderly that keeps looking at you with desire. I can see in his eyes that any day now he is going to force you to bed him.”

Lizzy ripped her hands out of Tessa’s. “Don’t touch me!” she yelled. “No one here looks at me with desire and no one is going is going to force me to bed them!”

Tessa narrowed her eyes at her. “There’s no need to be rude Lizzy,” she said. “I was just trying to look out for you and maybe have a little fun in the process.”

“I don’t want to have fun!” Lizzy exclaimed. “Not with either of you! Your idea of having fun is hurting people.” She looked from one to the other. “You both are manipulative and selfish! You have never done anything for me that did not overall benefit you and your amusement!”

Tessa scoffed and George lifted an eyebrow

“The both of you are evil figments of my own dark, twisted imagination and I want you gone!”

George shook his head and took a step forward. “Lizzy, please, we know you don’t many any of that.”

“That’s right,” Tessa said. “If you really wanted us gone you never would have stopped taking your medication.”

“That’s right,” Lizzy thought. “I stopped taking my pills two weeks ago. That’s why they’re here.” She looked over at her bed, her eyes resting on a little hole in the mattress. She lunged at it.

“What are you doing?” George asked curiously.

Lizzy pulled out a handful of pills and held them out for them to see.

“What are you going to do with those, Lizzy?” Tessa asked trying to remain calm.

Lizzy grabbed her cold coffee from the table. “I’m going o take them,” she replied.

“All of them at once?” Tessa asked in alarm.

“You can’t do that, Lizzy!” George said grabbing her arm.

Lizzy shook him off. “You wouldn’t leave on your own so I am forcing you out!” she yelled as she shoved the handful of pills in her mouth, a few dropping to the floor. She then gulped down the rest of her coffee and shivered. “I don’t need you anymore! I never needed you!”

Tessa and George looked on horrified.

“Lizzy, what have you done?” George asked.

“You’ve killed us all,” Tessa said.

Lizzy’s stomach began to cramp and it became harder for her to breathe. She gasped for air as she stumbled to the ground, a strange foam forming in her mouth as her body began to violently convulse.

All of a sudden there was a great burst of noise as nurses and orderlies surrounded her shouting at one another in panicked voices as lights were shined in her eyes and she was lifted effortlessly off of the ground.

In the corner of the room Lizzy could see the fading images of Tessa and George holding onto each other and she smiled as they carted her away.

***

Lizzy awoke under a bright light. Her throat was raw and it hurt to swallow. She tried to move but her arms were strapped to the bed.

“You gave us quite a scare, Lizzy,” came an unfamiliar voice.

She looked up to see a doctor in a bright white coat.

“Luckily we were able to pump your stomach just in time.”

“Who?” Lizzy asked breathlessly, her throat screaming in pain.

“Forgive me,” the doctor said. “My name is Dr. Roberta Katz, with a ‘z’. I’m new.”

Lizzy nodded.

“Your throat will be sore for a few days. That’s from the tube we used to pump your stomach. It’s normal.”

“Thank you,” Lizzy whispered.

Dr. Katz smiled. “I’m just doing my job,” she replied turning to leave. “Oh, by the way, I met your friends. They were very concerned about you.”

“Friends?” Lizzy managed to get out, confused.

Dr. Katz nodded. “George and Tessa.”

Lizzy shook her head. “No,” she squeaked. “No!”

“They are very anxious to see you.”

Lizzy writhed in her restraints screaming, her throat burning from the strain. “No!” she screamed again and again.

Orderlies flew in to hold her down running right through Dr. Katz as the nurses administered a sedative. She struggled against all of them looking out of the small window of the door to see Tessa, George and Dr. Katz smiling back at her.

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    • Becky Katz profile image

      Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ

      She is just as disturbed as before. Interesting Dr though.

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