ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Writer's Mailbag: Installment Twenty-Eight

Updated on January 5, 2015

Happy New Year

Installment Twenty-Eight is here, ringing in the New Year of 2015. Welcome to you all! I hope you not only survived the holidays but enjoyed them greatly. The tree has finally been taken down, the presents are all unwrapped and put away, the final turkey leftovers have been eaten, and now it’s time to get back to work.

I’m one of the lucky ones. I’m a writer, and for me, writing isn’t work. I’m lucky enough to get up every day and get paid to do something I love doing, and that is writing. What a great life I have! I hope you feel the same way about writing.

Let’s get started, shall we? I’ve got a bag full of questions to answer, so let’s dive in and find out what treasures await.

Welcome to The Mailbag
Welcome to The Mailbag | Source

Fiction Vs Nonfiction Grammar

From Bradmaster: “Are there different rules of grammar for writing fiction versus nonfiction?”

This is a really interesting question, and I had to stop and think before answering….which I don’t always do. J

Grammar is grammar is grammar. That is my spur-of-the-moment answer. The rules of grammar don’t change just because the genre is different. The proper use of adjectives, adverbs, nouns and verbs is consistent no matter what you are writing.

Having said that, I think fiction allows the writer to suspend the rules of grammar if it helps with the flow of the story, and rarely do you see grammatical rules suspended in nonfiction.

If I am writing dialogue, the grammar within that dialogue may be improper, but the way it is presented on the page, the use of quotation marks and other punctuation, should always be consistent with the rules of grammar.

Does that make sense?

I also think, for the most part, that voice is different when writing nonfiction as opposed to fiction, but voice really isn’t a grammatical issue.

I’m sure my friend Jaye will be by with something to add. She’s the expert and I’ll bow to her.

Different people equals different speech patterns
Different people equals different speech patterns | Source

Character Voice

From Janice: “How does a writer make each character sound unique in their speech patterns?”

Another fantastic question, and this is something every writer of fiction must work hard at. If you listen to people in everyday life, you will notice they all sound somewhat different in their speech patterns. Sometimes the difference is slight; sometimes it is very noticeable.

Just as normal people sound different, so, too, must your characters when writing fiction.

Let me tell you what I do. I’m sure other writers have other techniques, but I can only tell you what works for me.

When I write a short story or a novel, I am not concerned with different speech patterns in my first draft. I just want to tell the story that first time through. It is in the second draft that I individualize my characters and give them specific ways of speaking. One might speak with a liberal amount of slang. Another might have a slight stutter. One might speak with an abundance of cuss words. Another may be prim and proper and never use contractions.

The difference does not have to be huge, but there should be a difference. Remember that a work of fiction is really just a reflection of real life as seen through the eyes of the author.

One trick I have learned to use is to take a tape recorder (digital recorder) to a public place. There I will record casual conversations I hear. I then refer to those when I’m writing dialogue. I find it helpful.

What kind of mood would this scene represent?
What kind of mood would this scene represent? | Source

MOOD

From Bob: “How do you set the mood for a story?”

We are really delving into the meat and potatoes of fiction writing with these questions. If you are considering trying fiction, pay close attention to the last three questions, because they really are quite important to a writer of fiction.

Setting a mood is as simple as providing sensory details that support that mood. Let me give you a couple examples.

If I want a dark and foreboding mood, I might put my character on a desolate highway in the middle of nowhere. The rain is crashing down, the thunder is roaring and the lightning is threatening. Every shadow seems to be dangerous. Every stranger appears sinister.

If I want a cheery mood, that same character will be driving on a sunlit day, the wind is in his hair, the soft breeze is caressing him, and strangers are helpful and friendly.

Remember that your readers all have the same senses, and their past experiences will help them to clue into the mood if you play to those senses and sensory memories.

Time Is on My Side

From Brenda: “Where do you find the time to do everything you do?”

I’ll tell you something that few people know: I made a deal with the devil a long time ago, and extra time is what I get out of that deal.

Kidding! Please know I’m kidding.

It’s all about organization, scheduling and singleness of purpose. Memorize those words and put them into practice.

I don’t allow things to distract me from my work day. I sequester myself in the writing studio by seven each morning, and I surface from that studio around three or four each afternoon. I have my writing day scheduled by the hour, and I stick with that schedule. It really is as simple and as complicated as that.

Those Dreaded Endings

From Putka: “I’m having trouble with the ending of my novel. How does one write a satisfying ending?”

The word “satisfying” has me a little stumped, but let’s ignore that for the time being, and concentrate on the simple task of ending a novel.

The ending should conclude the conflict that was happening in your story. Readers need closure, and although that is a highly overused word, it is true in this case. We, as writers, have taken our readers on a 300-page journey, and that journey needs to have a conclusion that ties up all loose ends. To do otherwise, I think, is to cheat the reader.

The main plot, and the subplots, need endings. You can’t take a reader through a tumultuous adventure and then leave them hung out to dry without satisfying their curiosity. That should always be the first goal of an ending.

As for satisfying, that really is in the eye of the beholder. What is satisfying to one reader may not be satisfying to another. We can’t please all of our readers no matter how we choose to end our novel or short story. I think the ending should be interesting. I think it should inspire thought and strong reaction…but don’t worry for a second about satisfying every reader because it won’t happen.

Finding Success

Easyonlife asks: “How long do you think it should take a writer to find success?”

I don’t even know how to answer this one, and I’m not being mean when I say that. What does success mean? It seems to me it means something different for every writer.

I suspect this question has more to do with financial success, so that’s how I’ll answer it. I hate to be difficult, but what does financial success mean? If your goal is to make an extra couple hundred dollars a month, then I think that is very doable in six months. If your goal is to be a well-known author with a bestselling novel, then I think you better get comfortable and plan on five-to-ten years, provided you have talent.

That’s the best I can do with that one.

More Next Week

The questions are still pouring in so we’ll keep this series going for another week. Thanks to those who asked questions this week. I’m enjoying them and I hope you are getting something out of the answers.

Feel free to ask your own questions in the comment section below, and if you have anything to add to the discussion, toss that in as well. Join me on my writing blog at www.williamdhollandauthor.com for more discussions about the Art of Writing.

Have a great week of writing!

2015 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 2 years ago from New York, New York

      As always so helpful and just can't thank you enough ever for taking the time to your take on all our questions. Happy New Year Bill and have a wonderful Monday now, too!

    • profile image

      tuhincba 2 years ago

      this is a helpful site for all the site users so thank you for the site free press release sites

    • profile image

      tuhincba 2 years ago

      thaks

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Janine and Happy Monday! Thank you my dear. Have a great work week.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, tuhincba. Thank you for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Again you are welcome. :)

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 2 years ago

      I think you are amazing. It seems to me that your work on HP must consume so much of your time. You have to be the person on the site with the most activity.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheez, I don't know, Pop. I know I'm the person on HP who is the most grateful. :) For you and all like you....thank you!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 2 years ago from Central Florida

      Happy New Year, Bill!

      You certainly get your readers thinking. The questions are getting more and more in-depth. See what you started? LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, you're right. This one just kind of snowballed out of control on me. :) In a good way.

      Happy Monday dear friend, and thank you.

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 2 years ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      Great answers to excellent questions. I am working on making that pact with the devil right now--sequestered space without interruption. It may sound like an excuse, but my mom has cancer which means I am often on-call and if I am not there with her, then she calls me frequently. It is hard for me to say to her not to bother me while I am doing what I would like to do most. This is another reason why my time on HP is sporadic. I will, however, keep on keeping on...

      Many blessings to you and Bev for the New Year.

      Kim

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kim, I would say that's a damned good excuse. I'm sorry about your mother....but I'm happy you were able to visit me again. Bless you, and her, and Happy New Year to you both.

      bill

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I'm glad you were asked about ending a story, that's what I have the most trouble with. Thank you again for helping us be better writers..

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for your kind words, Ruby. Truth be told, I have much more trouble with the ending than any other part of a story or novel.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      bradmasterOCcal 2 years ago from Orange County California

      billybuc

      Thanks for answering my question, I must have learned the rules of grammar at some time, but now, when I break the classical rules of grammar, I call it my style. I guess that if you know that you are breaking the rules, it is at least not from being illiterate.

      As for the mood setting, I always liked the "It was a dark and dreary night."

      Now, my next question is about double quotes at the end of a sentence. what is the rule of grammar for where the period is placed in that kind of sentence?

      Thanks

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Brad. I like it....breaking the rules is called "style." Too funny...and true.

      Stay tuned. I'll have your answer next Monday.

      Thanks, my friend.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      As always, great stuff here Bill. I learned plenty mucho.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks, Eric! Plenty mucho is a good thing. :)

    • Iris Draak profile image

      Cristen Iris 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

      Always useful, Bill. Especially the discipline part because none of the rest of it really matters if we won't actually do the work. You set a great example.

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 2 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

      A wonderful and helpful variety of Q & A this week, Bill...thank you and a happy new year's Monday to you. Love, Maria

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      So much is about observation isn't it? I like the recording of conversations; really good idea. Sometimes I write things down when I catch a phrase that appeals to me but recording is easier and much less obtrusive.

      The ending is a difficult one. I'm about to enter a 'Writers' and Artists' Yearbook' short story competition; I decided I'd better have my ending planned and I have. I've also got my beginning.

      Haven't a clue what's going to happen in between but I'm reasonably confident it will pick itself up and ride along. I won't be surprised, though, if the ending is entirely different to the one I've planned - but that won't matter! If the character(s) take it there, that's fine by me.

      Hope this year brings you as much writing success as you deserve, bill. I'll be supporting you all the way; just remember me when you're famous!

      Ann :)

    • mdscoggins profile image

      Michelle Scoggins 2 years ago from Fresno, CA

      Great way to start the new year Bill. Your idea about recording common conversations to gain different character voices and persona's is genius and I will definitely use. Also, ending a novel resonated as well since I have somewhat put mine down for now and I am stuck at the end. Plus I have a million other things going on so I am not sure when I will get it done. But I will take your advice and not worry so much on "satisfying" everyone and finish the darned thing in an interesting way! Granted when time permits. Have a great week.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Iris. I was raised to believe in the value of hard work. I don't know any other way. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Maria, and Happy Monday to you. I always appreciate you stopping by.

      love,

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, that's how I write novels. I start with an introduction, decide on an ending, and then fill in the middle 80,000 words as I go. LOL Not recommended for everyone, but it works for me.

      Remember you? I'm planning on visiting you when I get famous. No worries!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MIchelle, I hope you find the time to get back to that book and finish it. I'm so grateful that I have nothing else to do but write. Best wishes to you and Happy New Year.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 2 years ago from SW England

      Well, if that's the way you do it, then I'm happy with it too!

      I'd better get out the welcome mat then!

      Ann

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 2 years ago from Arizona

      Interesting about grammar. I think there is a certain freedom when you want to make a point???! However what bothers me more are spelling errors. I just read a book by a favorite author with 5 or 6 spelling errors. I love the way you use your time. And I know when you stick with a definite schedule the hours expand. 8 hours is a long time and I can see where you get tons done. No interruptions of phone calls, laundry, etc....

      I am working on disciplining myself to work at least 1 hour a day on the book. ...at least for now. Working at getting a good format and also some humor.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, dust that mat off. One of these days......

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I have the perfect situation for a writer. This is what I do. Evenings and weekends are for family. Weekdays are for writing. With that schedule, I have no excuses. :) Thanks as always and good luck with that book.

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 2 years ago from Minnesota

      Great questions and answers this week! I especially liked (and needed to pay attention) to the character voice. I was questioning whether I had to have each voice completely flushed out before I started writing, so I really like that you mentioned you do the first draft without worrying about it....I think that is an excellent plan and there went another excuse I might have held onto for not finishing that first draft. Thanks as always and have a great week!

    • clivewilliams profile image

      Clive Williams 2 years ago from Nibiru

      when is the e book coming out?

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Melissa, I'm so sorry for ruining another excuse for you. Darn it all to hell, warn me next time. LOL

      Thanks my friend. I want to see that first draft when you finish it....please!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Clive, you would think with all the time I spend on writing, that ebook would already be written...sadly it sits on the to-do list waiting its turn.

      Thanks my friend and Happy New Year to you.

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 2 years ago from Washington State, USA

      Bill, thank you for another great hub from the mailbag. I chuckled over "Those Dreaded Endings." I have read far too many books that hold my attention until the final chapter, and then it seems the author is in a rush to get this thing done. When the ending doesn't satisfy, seems hurried, or suddenly everything is sunshine, lollipops and rainbows I feel a sense of betrayal, wondering why I invested (wasted) precious hours when in the end the author obviously lost interest in what he/she was doing. You've never done that to your readers my friend. Thanks again and have a great week!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, I'm nodding my head in agreement. I don't know how many books I've read where that has happened, and I'm left frustrated and more than a little bit ticked off. :) Thank you for your kind words. I sure do try to give my readers everything I've got, right up to the very end.

    • Sunshine625 profile image

      Linda Bilyeu 2 years ago from Orlando, FL

      You made a deal with the devil! Haha! An ebook of these installments is a fabulous idea. They are informative and useful...Bill's Handy Writing Guide :)

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 2 years ago

      So many great ideas, here.

      I cannot stick to a schedule as strict as yours. Also, my characters

      demand a little time off. They complain that I push them too hard.

      I have learned patience and tolerance. When the talking ones get

      ready to talk, there is no holding them back. Where once was a blank

      stare, suddenly they are off and running with me typing as fast as I can.

      What a rush!! I swear, endorphins must flood my system!!

      I think this writing gig should come with a warning. "May be habit forming!" LOL

      Many thanks, Bill, for turning me on to the greatest drug I could imagine. The drug is called, "creation". From creation comes awareness, and from awareness comes progress and progress

      derives growth and finally, confidence. What a trip!

      Many thanks, Bill.

      DJ.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, it's on my to-do list, but for some reason, the to do list keeps getting longer and not shorter. :) Thanks for the encouragement.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      What a trip indeed, DJ. I can't tell you how excited it makes me to hear your joy. That is so very cool! Turn those characters loose, loosen up your typing fingers, and get back to work young lady.

      Many thanks to you,

      bill

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 2 years ago from london

      Excellent, Bill. This one seems to fit 2015. Maybe it's me. I'm awake, I hope and the Hub feels fresh, entertaining, a mandatory read and pretty exquisite! I like your answer to Brenda's time problem, and I will give you a prayer for this at the end. First though, are you stealing my lines again?

      "If I want a dark and foreboding mood, I might put my character on a desolate highway in the middle of nowhere. The rain is crashing down, the thunder is roaring and the lightning is threatening. Every shadow seems to be dangerous. Every stranger appears sinister.

      If I want a cheery mood, that same character will be driving on a sunlit day, the wind is in his hair, the soft breeze is caressing him, and strangers are helpful and friendly." - Bill Holland.

      He he, they're not my lines, but I love them, Bro.

      Here's the funny yet serious prayer, as it comes from a man of God:

      "My Supreme, my Supreme ... my Supreme.

      Do give me 48-hrs a day, to accomplish,

      Everything that I need to accomplish.

      Every single day." It is actually a song.

      Brenda reminded me.

      P.S. Today three ladies visited your 'The Gentleman and His Dog' Hub, and said nice things. Perhaps you know them. Peace.

    • profile image

      lovedoctor926 2 years ago

      Happy New Year! Useful information. Helpful tips & advice. Thank you Bill. voted up!

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 2 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Useful mailbag. Fiction writing techniques always get my attention. Reminders of how to distinguish characters are useful. To what degree is it attempted/done is the challenge I face. Individual choice, again, of course.

      Thanks, again, for this offering!! ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Manatita, for the kind words and the prayer/song. I could use those 48 hours, but I'll have to learn to use my 24 more efficiently. I'll check out the hub you mentioned.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Doc, and Happy New Year to you. I hope you are well, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, you said it all...individual choice. In the end, it's up to the writer to tell the story in his/her own way. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • sallybea profile image

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Nice to think it is doable to make a couple of hundred dollars in six months. I don't like to disagree with you Billy but I have to be doing something wrong because in two years I still have not managed it.

      Having said that, I have to say my traffic continues to rise and it was at it's highest ever today. My own website seems to be doing a little better than here so guess I just have to keep plugging away at it to make those few hundred dollars.

      Sorry I was a bit late today in commenting, seems things caught up with me today.

      Sally

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sally, thanks for the visit and I don't mind you stating your facts at all. Such is the nature of this business, and there are no guarantees for any of us.

      Happy New Year to you and may 2015 bring you that extra couple hundred dollars.

      bill

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 2 years ago

      Thanks Bill for an answer before having chance to figure out how to structure a question of my own.

      You people are geniuses.

      Voted useful & interesting.

    • profile image

      Smilealot 2 years ago

      Nearly all these questions that come up in this series are ones that I have probably asked in my own head at some point but haven't come out, like the grammar in fiction/non-fiction one here, I was only thinking about that the other day. No wonder the series is popular, everyone can find something relevant...thanks Bill:-))

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      A great installment to start the new year. Voice and mood are so vital to whatever we write. You've dovetailed these questions and made this another installment worth re-reading.

      Linda is right you know. These installments would make a great ebook.

      Voted up, useful and so very interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, it's a gift I have that few know about. :)

      Have a peaceful sleep my friend, and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Smilealot, I hope that remains true. I have found that most writers have the same thoughts and questions, so one size seems to fit all most of the time. :) Thanks for being here.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I swear, I need more time. Do you have any you can loan me? I've got all these ideas, but I have to sleep and eat at some point. LOL

      Thank you as always.

    • GabeG profile image

      Gabe Gutierrez 2 years ago

      Very interesting and insightful. I have always been passionate about writing even from an early age in life. I am a business professional for a fortune 200 organization and couldn't agree with you more on your insight to "time management." Organization, scheduling, and singleness of purpose. In the business world this is very similar to competing priorities and knowing what you need to get done. I am finding more and more that my craft in writing is similar to anything else in life, it is like a muscle that must be flexed, exercised and utilized in order to establish endurance and insight.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      The questions are especially interesting this week, Bill. Thanks for sharing the answers. I'm looking forward to next week's mailbag hub.

    • anusha15 profile image

      Anusha Jain 2 years ago from Delhi, India

      Off course part of the credit to all your Writers' Mailbag installments will go to the "Askers"... but then the askers' questions exist because of this series, and off course, they keep growing in diversity, complexity and usability because of the quality of answers IMO. It's an interesting recursion, don't you think? :) Great hub, with awesome choice and order of Q & A, and needless to say, very precise and useful answers.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Very interesting questions this week Bill. After this series is complete we should all be equipped with everything we need to write a novel or work of fiction and have it published. Almost every possible question will have been asked and answered. Great stuff.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Another exceedingly good mailbag Bill, just keep 'em comming. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gabe, you summarized it perfectly. The similarities between the craft of writing and any other undertaking worth doing are striking. Thank you for your thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Alicia. I thought these were great questions as well.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Anusha, thank you very much. I agree that we feed off of each other...great questions raise the quality of answers, and a great forum allows for great questions.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, John, that is the goal. Let's hope I meet it. Thank you as always, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Jo! I will, indeed, keep them coming.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

      the first of the new year brings bulks of information Billybuc.. thanks for bringing it on with conviction

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, Frank, and thanks for being receptive to it.

    • profile image

      lovedoctor926 2 years ago

      I am doing well Bill. thank you. I hope that you and Bev had a wonderful Christmas and New Years. Doc.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      We did, Doc, thank you!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 2 years ago from Dubai

      Great questions and answers. Hats off to you, you keep writing here churning out wonderful hubs, you have released books and you are volunteering if I am correct! You must be very good in organizing your time and in all this hectic schedule I wonder how you get the time to rest and take care off yourself.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      You always have such interesting points and also very helpful to all writers.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vellur, rest assured that I schedule in time for rest and relaxation. The evenings are all mine to rest up and enjoy family. Thank you and blessings to you always.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE. I hope you always think so.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      Our speech patterns are unique and brand us in terms of personality, profession and place (in time, life and geography).

      I think my favorite example of speech use in writing is Faulkner's "The Sound and the Fury." Each character's "voice" is so unique that the speech patterns alone tell the story.

      Glad your deal with the devil helped your time management. *snickers*

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heidi, you just mentioned a perfect example in Faulkner's work. Thanks for that reference....and the devil says hello. :)

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 2 years ago

      Interesting Bill, especially setting the mood. It may sound a bit weird, but I think this, like your other articles, can apply to recipe/craft articles. I can easily set a scene in that sort of article just by the type of recipe/craft is being done.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Several novels I have read recently needed you as a consultant on the ending. They ended it way too tidily, making me feel like, "Is this all there is?"

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I don't think that's weird, Glimmer. A talented writer can set the mood in any article or story that they write, and you have such talent. Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I hate it when that happens, and it happens much more often than it should. I'm all for doing a little consulting work; now I have to figure out a way to get those authors to call me. :) Thank you!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 2 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for more writing tips, Bill! Happy New Year!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Happy New Year, vkwok,and thank you.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      I like the idea of recording conversations when out and about. Sometimes you have a great writing idea and if not written or recorded it is forgotten. Always thankful for your advice.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Dianna. The first time I did it, I felt like I worked for the CIA. Now I'm okay with it and it is very helpful.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Excellent topics were covered, and I learned from them. Thanks for always being there and teaching us so much.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, Deb, and I thank you for your loyal friendship.

    Click to Rate This Article