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What Inspires the Writings of Dawn Collins

Updated on November 28, 2012
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A few people have asked me what inspires my writing. Before I answer this question I would like to point out that the greatest creative minds are a little off balance. That is to say in order to create other worlds, you must first have lived in them. I firmly believe this and I have lived my life popping in and out of several worlds, which is why I sometimes feel like such an alien sometimes in the "real world". I hope the words I've just expressed touch the hearts of other wayward souls and the message I give to you is just keep imagining and creating and someday you'll find others who find your worlds as beautiful and interesting as you do.

And also a special thanks to my mother and father who only ever pulled my head out of the clouds in order to prevent me from running into things. I wish my dad were still here to see what happens next, for I assure you the best is yet to come.

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A Natural Gift

It seems like I was born with a writing utensil in my hand. I've been writing since before I could form words. I used to fill notebooks with scribbles and then "read" them to my family. I wrote my first poems and short stories at around age seven. At around age eight, I added "playwright" to my other titles. Usually my plays were adaptations of fairy tales or other stories I had read. I would gather up my cousins and brothers and convinced them to preform my plays in our grandmother's basement. By junior high my writings became what the teacher would read out loud to the class, which might have been part of what made me a bit of an outcast. I became so self-conscious that I would refuse to stay in the room if the teacher insisted on reading something of mine out loud, and didn't really take pride in my work until eighth grade when my English teacher (who I really liked and respected) commented that she couldn't wait to read my published work one day. From then on I worked harder on the thought I put into my writing both in and outside of school.

Dreams

One way I am inspired on what to write are my dreams. I have a very active subconscious and can rarely remember a night where I didn't have some sort of vision. I am rarely myself in my dreams which is great for the creation of characters, and the reason why I have often said that I don't create characters, they come to me.

I also daydream a lot and hate being tied down to any sort of activity that doesn't allow me to stop and write things down. I have worked in the fast food industry for thirteen years and while I've had some really good experiences at work, I've also lost out on some inspiration because I couldn't write down my daydream right away (I've also found that coworkers, managers, and especially customers don't like it much when you daydream while working a cash register).

Kids

I have been an aunt since I was fifteen and also worked with preschoolers and fourth graders while I was in high school. Anyone who has been around children knows that they are full of a sense of wonder that is down right contagious. I've written so many great things after having a conversation with a niece or nephew.

Creativity Runs In The Family

When I was young, my aunt and uncle would take me to see the plays my cousin acted in. I also have a few aunts, uncles and cousins who are very artistic. I have several relatives who write, including a cousin who was published at age seventeen. Being surrounded by other imaginative souls has helped me follow my own talents and dreams.

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    • xstatic profile image

      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      This is really interesting, and having read it, I am curious about your writing, so will check out some more.

    • craiglyn profile image

      Lynda 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Very nice indeed. I can see you come from a family of very talented people and I say "keep going" you obviously have a great imagination - a thing that great works are made up. : )

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      So interesting and inspiring.

      Thank you for shariung.

      Eddy.

    • Leesflores profile image

      Mrs Flores 4 years ago from everywhere

      All wonderful tools for inspiration. I am sure you will keep them up.

    • alancaster149 profile image

      Alan Robert Lancaster 4 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

      I used to do scribblings at an early age, but most of them were what passed for drawings. Story inventions came and went, but I wasn't bitten by the writing bug until later. I wanted to be a commercial artist and the nearest I got to that was doing advert layouts for a local newspaper in the Midlands. Writing fiction came later, but before laptops were invented and I went through a lot of paper! Now the paper is in the finished results (my books).

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I loved reading about your desire to write, and that you are a dreamer, me too. Enjoyed..Thank you.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 4 years ago from The Caribbean

      Thanks for sharing. Keep on following your passion, and all the best going forward.

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 4 years ago from TEXAS

      Heck! I AM an alien! It's difficult to fathom the natives sometimes! ;-)

      I never search for inspiration. First of all, it's not that kind of beast, slinking around corners, hiding behind bushes, needing to be captured. It decides.

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 4 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      Up and Interesting. No doubt you are a writer. I wonder if you were an enthusiastic one in a past life and if that's why you were scribbling stories before you could write words.

      One idea for a job at which you can write is as a sign "spinner" or holder. A few years ago I had a job holding a big "Buy Gold" sign at a busy intersection. Behind the sign I had folded scrap paper, and I would write stories and essays little by little during traffic lulls. I worked 25 hours per week and kept the job until I moved.

      Another possibility perhaps is as a hospital patient sitter. I don't have personal experience, but from what I've heard, you must stay alert and aware at all times, so the patient doesn't get agitated and pull out tubes or something, but if the patient is asleep or contentedly watching TV, you can read a book, sew (unless it's a suicide watch), do crossword puzzles, and so on, or scribble stories. And another possibility is assisting a disabled person at home. Times of doing light housekeeping or of assisting the person as needed may be interspersed with minutes of free time in which you can write.

      I liked your Facebook page.

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