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What To Do When You Catch Writer's Block Disease?

Updated on December 29, 2014
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Maurice Bishop, a powerful, spoken word Poet currently serving in the United States Army. Published Author & Motivational Speaker.

Poet's Writer's Block

Writer's block is frustrating for most poets; especially when one needs material for their poetry slam competitions. Many poets sit with a pen in their hand and a notebook in their lap for hours and nothing is written on the paper. If you are like me you may feel like you have no inspiration so you'll listen to your favorite poet on youtube to get inspiration. Some of us may take a break from writing and then come back when your mojo is back. Every poet goes through this frustrating phase and I have 6 effective ways of overcoming writer's block.

1. Get Your Blood Flowing. When you catch writer's block you need to stop writing and start exercising. I'm not talking about doing a complete insanity workout like Sean T where you're drenching with sweat, but I'm talking about doing enough exercise that gets your blood flowing. For example, you can walk around the park, ride a bike around the park, go to the gym and play basketball etc. Do anything that involves getting your heart rate up. Now you're probably asking me how is exercising going to help me put my words on paper? Well, exercising improves brain function and actually protects against cognitive decline. The Franklin Institute website which is the science of learning even stated that, "Movement and exercise increase breathing and heart rate so that more blood flows to the brain, enhancing energy production and waste removal. Always remember if blood flows then creativity flows.

2. Free Write Your Ideas. Most poets try to find the perfect rhyme, the perfect flow, the perfect description of how they feel or perfect description of their experience, and so on. Whatever comes to mind you need to write it on paper. If it's a certain word you are trying to rhyme to then you need to write down every word that does rhyme. If you need help with rhyming get a rhyming dictionary or google rhyming dictionary and you will find plently of searches. If you are looking for a perfect flow or that poetic flow then write down any words that connect to your story. For example, if I want to write a poem about my love for my wife and I want my poem to have a poetic flow then I need to write down words that describe my love for my wife. Love, wife, mind, write, smile, gorgeous, and man are my group of words. I would write:

"Being in love with my wife is the reason I write these rhymes between the lines,

I wish I could put a clock in my mind to show you that I think of you every time,

Her smile worth a fortune, she's intelligent and gorgeous,

Her love don't cost a thing but no man can afford it,"

When you write words that describe what you're talking about you will be able to pick the words you want to use in your poem and make something creative out of it. It is very effective and I've use this technique to write the poem, "Love Poetry For My Wife". I even have a live video of me performing this poem at http://wisdom25.hubpages.com/hub/Love-Poetry-For-My-Wife.

3. Just Write. I know this sounds simple and plain but it really is. If you really don't know what to write about just start writing. Don't think about how it sounds just write. Eventually you will have enough written on paper that you will find something in your writing that stands out to you. After you read what you wrote start revising your poem.

4. Drink Coffee. I don't care what nutrionists or diet experts say but caffeine is a great boost and it will stir your mind. It is also great to drink coffee if you don't have time to exercise. However, I don't recommend drinking coffee every single day but that's another topic.

5. Listen To Music. I recommend listening to jazz, r&b, piano instrumentals or anything that stimulates your mind to a peaceful state. Some poets like writing in peace and quiet and some poets like writing while listening to music. I believe certain music has a certain tune that brings out the creativity in poets. When I listen to music I feel good and think about my dreams, my wife and son, my day at work, the news, interesting things I read in a book and so on. Music that helps you relax opens your mind to write the truth about how you feel. When I wrote Restoration which is about me being molested and how I overcame it, I listened to jazz while writing out my past. You can read what I wrote; as well as see my live performance of this poem at http://wisdom25.hubpages.com/hub/MOLESTATION-RESTORATION.

6. Keep Writing. Yes! I want you poets to keep writing. The #1 thing that can prevent a lot of writer's block is if you write on a daily basis. A track star has to keep training to run in order to be a great runner. A UFC fighter has to keep training to fight in order to be a great fighter. A great dancer, singer, and rapper has to keep training their craft in order to be great. Poets have to train their writing skills and write on a daily basis in order to be a great poet. Once you accomplish that in your life, then the word writer's block does even exist in your mind.

If you poets out there have any questions about overcoming writer's block or wanting to be a better poet, feel free to message me, comment, or email me at wisdom.spoken@gmail.com. I check my email everyday so I'm very quick to answer.

Unstuck: A Supportive and Practical Guide to Working Through Writer's Block
Unstuck: A Supportive and Practical Guide to Working Through Writer's Block

No one is immune to writer's block. From well-known novelists to students writing term papers, Ph.D. candidates, and associates in business and law firms, most anyone who writes has experienced either brief moments or longer periods when the words simply won't come. Based on her experience as a writing coach and instructor--and before that, as a blocked writer for many years--Jane Anne Staw provides practical, effective strategies for overcoming this common yet vexing problem. Topics include: * handling anxiety and fear * carving out time and space to write * clearing out old beliefs and doubts * techniques to relax * managing expectations * experimenting with genre, voice, and subject matter * ending the struggle and regaining confidence and freedom by finding your true voice - and using it. Unstuck uncovers the reasons why writers of all levels get blocked--from practical to emotional, and many in between--and offers concrete ways to get writing again, and to find an even deeper connection and more productivity on the page

 
Around the Writer's Block: Using Brain Science to Solve Writer's Resistance
Around the Writer's Block: Using Brain Science to Solve Writer's Resistance

Discover the tricks that your brain uses to keep you from writing—and how to beat them. Do you: Want to write, but find it impossible to get started? Keep your schedules so full that you don’t have any time to write? Wait until the last minute to write, even though you know you could do a better job if you gave yourself more time? Suddenly remember ten other things that you need to do whenever you sit down to write? Sabotage your own best efforts with lost files, missed deadlines, or excessive self-criticism? The good news is that you’re not lazy, undisciplined, or lacking in willpower, talent or ambition. You just need to learn what’s going on inside your brain, and harness the power of brain science to beat resistance and develop a productive writing habit. In Around the Writer’s Block, Rosanne Bane-- a creativity coach and writing teacher for more than 20 years-- uses the most recent breakthroughs in brain science to help us understand, in simple, clear language, where writing resistance comes from: a fight-or-flight response hard-wired into our brain, which can make us desperate to flee the sources of our anxieties by any means possible. Bane’s three-part plan, which has improved the productivity of thousands of writers, helps you develop new reliable writing habits, rewire the brain’s responses to the anxiety of writing, and turn writing from a source of stress and anxiety into one of joy and personal growth.

 
The Writer's Block: 786 Ideas to Jump-Start Your Imagination
The Writer's Block: 786 Ideas to Jump-Start Your Imagination

Anxious to write that Great American Novel but don't know where to begin? Help is on the way with our Writer's Block! This guide to beating writer's block comes packaged in the shape of an actual block: 3" x 3" x 3", with 672 pages and more than 200 photographs throughout. Next time you're stuck, just flip open The Writer's Block to any page to find an idea or exercise that will jump-start your imagination. Many of these assignments come straight from the creative writing classes of celebrated novelists like Ethan Canin, Richard Price, Toni Morrison, and Kurt Vonnegut: Joyce Carol Oates explains how she uses running to destroy writer's block. Elmore Leonard describes how he often finds ideas just by reading the newspaper. E. Annie Proulx discusses finding inspiration at garage sales. Isabel Allende tells why she always begins a new novel on January 8th. John Irving explains why he prefers to write the last sentence first. Fresh, fun, and irreverent, The Writer's Block also features advice from contemporary editors and literary agents, lessons from the awful novels of Joan Collins and Robert James Waller, a filmography of movies concerning writer's block (e.g., The Shining, Barton Fink), and countless other surprises. With this chunky little book at your side, you may never experience writer's block again!

 

Without Christ - (Had Writer's block with this piece and finally finished it)

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    • cleaner3 profile image

      cleaner3 3 years ago from Pueblo, Colorado

      interesting ..

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 3 years ago from San Tan Valley

      Thanks cleaner3. Much love and respect to you.

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