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Why is There No Plural of "You" in the English Language?


 

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Lisa Vollrath (lisavollrath) says

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4 months ago
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Eugene Brennan (eugbug) says

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4 months ago
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    Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) 3 months ago

    As in Scotland, it was the 'Aengle' and Danes who taught the Irish the English language as it was at the time. English Royalists and followers of James II taught them more and Oliver Cromwell's 'Ironsides' finished off the lesson. War teaches well.

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JS Matthew (J.S.Matthew) says

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4 months ago
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Vladimir Karas (ValKaras) says

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3 months ago
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    Vladimir Karas (ValKaras) 3 months ago

    Let me add a bit to my little "theory" of "linguistic arrogance": note how in English there are no female gender forms for most of professions, like: a doctor, a professor, an astronaut, a captain... with some exceptions like an actress, stuardesse..


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Rachael Lefler (RachaelLefler) says

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3 months ago
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Muhammad Hassan Ibrahim Minhas (Minhas333) says

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3 months ago
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Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) says

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4 months ago
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    Eugene Brennan (eugbug) 4 months ago

    That's all very interesting Alan. When the thorn character was replaced by 'y' in printed text, was thou pronounced as it is today, or was the 'y' sound used and thou prounced as you?


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bradmasterOCcal says

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4 months ago
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    Eugene Brennan (eugbug) 4 months ago

    The French use 'vous', it seems to be an oversight that English has no equivalent and all sorts of literary contrivances have to be made up to "fix" the omission.


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RTalloni says

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4 months ago
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    Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) 3 months ago

    Marion Morris (aka John Wayne) appeared on a TV chat show here and declared, "I speak American, not English!" Course, I know now, it's "Texicana" (a mix of Scots, Yorkshire, German, Irish and Italian).

    Tha knows his ain clan was Irish


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Melissa Reese Etheridge (melissae1963) says

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3 months ago
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Himangshu Goswami says

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3 months ago
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Alex Dernst says

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3 months ago
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    Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) 3 months ago

    They are a 'collective' form, Alex, along with fish and folk. So no 's' on the end. Different issue, methinks

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Kerri White (deeplypoetic) says

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3 months ago
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    Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) 3 months ago

    The 'collective' in English came through changes in the alphabet through print, as I indicated elsewhere. Other forms were shared in colloquial Danelaw English with the parent language, 'Du' (fam), 'De' (form/pl), 'Deres' (form/pl), 'Din' (sing)

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S Maree says

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2 months ago
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    Alan R Lancaster (alancaster149) 2 months ago

    North of the Border the Picts and Scots learned their English from the Northumbrian Angles and Anglo-Danes who took land as far as Edinburgh (Pictish: Dinas Eidin, Gaelic: Dunedin. "Your'n" is "your one" or "yours" ["This is mine, that's your'n"].

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GB (gogibs) says

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3 months ago
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Glenis Rix says

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    Eugene Brennan (eugbug) 3 months ago

    The problem is Glenis, there is no pronoun for the collective you. So are they not being inventive?


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