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Best Soliloquies in Macbeth

Updated on March 7, 2012

Soliloquy and its Importance

Soliloquy is an utterance of inner thoughts and ideas, revealed to himself or herself. When the speaker is alone, he uses it to state his mind. It is mostly used in dramas. Writer use it to express the things that are going on inside of the mind of the character. It helps audience and reader to understand the character. Shakespeare uses soliloquies in most of his dramas. Macbeth is one of them, in which he uses it to reveal the true character of Macbeth and his wife.

This lense focus on the important soliloquies of the drama Macbeth.

The Best Soliloquy of the Drama

ACT V SCENE V by Macbeth

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,

Creeps in this petty pace from day to day 20

To the last syllable of recorded time,

And all our yesterdays have lighted fools

The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!

Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player

That struts and frets his hour upon the stage

And then is heard no more: it is a tale

Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,

Soliloquies in Macbeth

soliloquy is somewhat of a device often used in drama whereby a character relates his or her thoughts and feelings to him/herself and to the audience without addressing any of the other characters, and is delivered often when they are alone or think they are alone. The soliloquies of Macbeth are very popular. Some of them are as below:

1. ACT I SCENE V (by Lady Macbeth)

'Thus thou must do, if thou have it;

And that which rather thou dost fear to do

Than wishest should be undone.' Hie thee hither,

That I may pour my spirits in thine ear;

And chastise with the valour of my tongue

All that impedes thee from the golden round,

Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem 30

To have thee crown'd withal.

2.ACT V SCENE I

"All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand"

3. ACT I SCENE III

If you can look into the seeds of time

And say which grain will grow and which will not,

Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear

Your favours nor your hate.

4.ACT I SCENE III

. . . Present fears

Are less than horrible imaginings;

5.ACT I SCENE IV

There is no art

To Find the mind's construction in the face;

He was a Gentleman on whom I built

An absolute trust.

6.ACT I SCENE IV

. . . Stars, hide your fires;

Let not light see my black and deep desires:

The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be,

Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

7. ACT I SCENE VII

If it were dobe when' tis done then 'twere well.

It were done quickly:

8. ACT II SCENE II

Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care,

The deat of each day's life, sore labour's bath

Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,

Chief nourisher in life's feast.

9. ACT II SCENE II

Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood

Clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather

The multitudinous seas incarnadine,

making the green one red.

Macbeth

Read the complete drama to enjoy and understand the whole work.

Watch

You can watch the most famous soliloquies of Macbeth on youtube. Certainly you will enjoy.

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    • oxfordian profile image

      oxfordian 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens. We seem to have a lot in common -- Austen and Shakespeare! I am happy to have found you. I enjoy reading your work very much.

    • oxfordian profile image

      oxfordian 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens. We seem to have a lot in common -- Austen and Shakespeare! I am happy to have found you. I enjoy reading your work very much.

    • goo2eyes lm profile image

      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      soliloquy is like monologue. love william shakespeare's dramas.

    • profile image

      Archana121 5 years ago

      nice lense