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The Fabulous Mitford Girls

Updated on September 23, 2014

Nancy,Diana,Debo,Jessica,Unity and Pam the Mitford Girls

The fabulous Mitford Girls born into great privilege will be drawn into the political turbulence of the thirties and know success and tragedy. This lens is not about rights and wrongs of what they believed but relates their fascinating story and also the excitement and the lost glamor of that age.

I've become rather obsessive about them hope you will too.

Lord Redesdale their father will say of his daughters: I am normal, my wife is normal but my daughters are each more foolish than the other!

Fabulous Mitford Girls home
Fabulous Mitford Girls home

The Fabulous Mitford Girls

The girls did not receive a proper education as their father did not believe in it for girls and even pulled his son out of school for a semester so he could learn to shoot game. Is this the reason that they fail to resist the fanaticism of that age and rush to the left or right, Communist or Fascist?

But is also the reason why they develop such forthright and fearless characters regardless of the opinions of others?

(Photo of their last home in Swinbrook)

Asthall Manor Happy Home of the Young Mitfords

Asthall Manor Happy Home of the Young Mitfords
Asthall Manor Happy Home of the Young Mitfords

The Mitford Girls

THE MITFORD GIRLS tells the true story behind the gaiety and frivolity of the six Mitford daughters - and the facts are as sensational as any novel: Nancy, whose bright social existence masked an obsessional doomed love which soured her success; Pam, a countrywoman married to one of the best brains in Europe; Diana, an iconic beauty, who was already married when at 22 she fell in love with Oswald Moseley, the leader of the British fascists; Unity, who romantically in love with Hitler, became a member of his inner circle before shooting herself in the temple when WWII was declared; Jessica, the family rebel, who declared herself a communist in the schoolroom and the youngest sister, Debo, who became the Duchess of Devonshire.This is an extraordinary story of an extraordinary family, containing much new material, based on exclusive access to Mitford archives.

Fatal Moment in Mitford Family History

Underage Jessica has eloped and runaway to Spain to fight the fascists, the British Government is trying to get her back safely. At the same time Diana and Unity are sitting down to tea with Hitler and are so close to him that Hitler's entourage are getting anxious. Meanwhile their cousin Winston Churchill is fighting for his political life.

Lady Redesdale their mother writes to Jessica saying I know it's my fault "You young girls have nothing to do" (are allowed to do nothing but wait for a rich husband). David, Lord Redesdale veteran of the Boer War ages rapidly at this time.

There is even a connection with the Kennedys!

Isolated Swinbrook House hated by the Mitford Girls, Bleak House

Isolated Swinbrook House hated by the Mitford Girls, Bleak House
Isolated Swinbrook House hated by the Mitford Girls, Bleak House

Final Mitford residence in Swinbrook Mill Cottage next to the Swan Pub

Final Mitford residence in Swinbrook Mill Cottage next to the Swan Pub
Final Mitford residence in Swinbrook Mill Cottage next to the Swan Pub

The Whole Mitford Family Together

The Whole Mitford Family Together
The Whole Mitford Family Together

Had you heard of the Mitfords Poll

Had you heard of the Mitfords?

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In better times they would have remained brilliant glittering county girls with rich noble husbands or lovers.

When did you first hear of the Mitfords?

Mitford Girls Reader Feedback

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Glad I returned to the Mitford Girls, because I see there must have been a Like Glitch. Well, that's all taken care of now. :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      It was in 1962/3 - I must have been about 13 or 14 and staying (Friday to Sunday) with my schoolfriend Lyndall Stein. She was reading Jessica's 'Hons and Rebels' and creasing with laughter. The next week I bought my own copy - and was hooked.

    • Grasmere Sue profile image

      Sue Dixon 5 years ago from Grasmere, Cumbria, UK

      We visited Chatsworth last year and saw Debo's 90th birthday exhibition. I think she's amazing

      They were an amazing set of sisters.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      "Teflon characters", that just about says it all! This is the first that I've heard of these very colorful ladies.