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The Ramayana (Synopsis)

Updated on May 21, 2012

My Review

In Ayodia there are festivities all over as the day has arrived when King Dasa-ratha will be crowning his eldest son, Rama, as the future King. But there is sorrow and anger in one part - that being with Kaikeyi - one of four wives of King Dasa-ratha, who wants her son, Bharata, to be crowned King. Her laments and complaints make Dasa-ratha give way to her, and she also makes him promise to send Rama away from Ayodia for 14 years. Rama accepts his step-mothers conditions, and sets out of Ayodia, with his wife, Sita, and younger brother, Lakshmana. The beginning of this journey is the beginning of the end of the tyranical King Ravana, and his rule on Ceylon.

he took his brother’s sandals as a proof that he is ruling in Rama’s name

Characters

  • Dasaratha -- King of Ayodhya (capital of Kosala), whose eldest son was Rama. Dasaratha had three wives and four sons -- Rama, Bharata, and the twins Lakshmana and Satrughna.
  • Rama -- Dasaratha's first-born son, and the upholder of Dharma (correct conduct and duty). Rama, along with his wife Sita, have served as role models for thousands of generations in India and elsewhere. Rama is regarded by many Hindus as an incarnation of the god Vishnu.
  • Sita -- Rama's wife, the adopted daughter of King Janak. Sita was found in the furrows of a sacred field, and was regarded by the people of Janak's kingdom as a blessed child.
  • Bharata -- Rama's brother by Queen Kaikeyi. When Bharata learned of his mother's scheme to banish Rama and place him on the throne, he put Rama's sandals on the throne and ruled Ayodhya in his name.
  • Ravana -- The 10-headed king of Lanka who abducted Sita.
  • Kaushlaya -- Dasaratha's first wife, and the mother of Rama.
  • Lakshmana -- Rama's younger brother by Dasaratha's third wife, Sumitra. When Rama and Sita were exiled to the forest, Lakshmana followed in order to serve.

Plot

Exposition: An archery contest was held for the hunt of Sita. Rama won the contest and was declared as the future king.

Rising Action: Because of Kaikeyi's jealousy, she requested Rama to be exiled in the forest of Dandak and let her son be the regent king.

Climax: Bharata followed Rama to convince him to return and be the king but he refused. So he took his brother's sandals as a proof that he is ruling in Rama's name.

Falling Action: A Raksha princess was rejected when she fell in love with Rama & Lakshmana. Inrevenger, Ravana sent a deer to tempt the the two brothers and stole Sita away.

Resolution: In the end of search, they successfully recovered Sita and returned to North India.

Your turn - Write a review, add a comment, or debate someone who disagrees with you.

What did you think?

Love it! Great read.

Love it! Great read.

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    • maxel 2 years ago

      I luv this story

    • maxel 2 years ago

      I luv this story

    • anonymous 3 years ago

      I want to knowthe story when rama returns with lov-kush to ayodhya.. what happened next ?

    • anonymous 4 years ago

      i love this

    • wilfredpadilla 5 years ago

      One of the best!

    • Jethro 5 years ago from Philippines

      I guess I read it before but I forgot. Thanks for refreshing it to my mind. :)

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      thankyou for the information. it helped me very much !

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      I think it is better to the climax there when ranawa and rama fight for sita :D

    • goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      nice story. remember cain and abel in the bible? jealousy is everywhere.

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      oh thanks.

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      it helps

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      its good

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      it's okay.......

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      this is so cool!! i succed in my assignment!! yahooooooooooooooo

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      nyc story

    • anonymous 5 years ago

      Ramayana is the art of living perfect life.

    • ojtpupt2010 6 years ago

      its cool :D

    • SofiaMann 6 years ago

      Very interesting. I am interested in this topic. Thanks.

    Sorry, not my cup of tea.

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      • anonymous 3 years ago

        what is the resolution???????

      Rate it, if you dare...

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      The best line ever:

      âBut I may not, seek Ayodiaâs ancient throne, for righteous fatherâs mandate duties son may not disown; and I may not, gentle brother, break the word of promise given. To a kind and to a father who is now a saint in heaven!â -Rama

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      Postscript of utmost importance

      If you buy any of the books recommended above, this page automatically makes a donation to the incredible nonprofit, Donors Choose, which helps provide classrooms and students in need with resources that our public schools often lack.

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