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Through Moon And Stars And Night Skies by Ann Turner

Updated on August 2, 2013

My Book Review of Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies by Ann Turner

Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies

Written by award winning author Ann Turner is a wonderful story about a little child in a far away land who has no home, no mama, no papa, and who is all alone in an orphanage. On one hope filled day, the little boy receives a letter from a distant land. The letter contains pictures and a bright promise of a new mama and papa. The boy holds in his hand a magical promise of a new life in a white house with a green tree out front, a big red dog, and a room waiting just for him with his very own teddy bear quilt.


"Let me tell the story this time, Mama.

Let me tell how I came to you.

Momma said, Let's remember, once I was a picture you held in your hand.

Shhh, Momma, I will tell how I carried all your pictures all the way to you."

This beautifully illustrated book tells the story from the perspective of a small boy who travels half a world away to join his new momma and papa that he so desperately desires for his very own. It tells a story of his long journey aboard the plane and all his fears during the endlessly long flight. It tells of his fears and apprehensions as he finally arrives at his destination. As the story unfolds, the reader experiences the child's hopes and fears as he clings to the hope that those pictures he clutches represent. A desperate hope, in his little heart, of one day having his very own mama and papa.

A story within a story brilliantly unfolds through the beautiful illustrations of James Graham Hale. The illustrations support a child's developing comprehension skills by inferring, through artful illustrations, the fears and hopes of a small child gazing out the window of a giant aircraft. Throughout the book, the brilliant artwork of James Graham Hale cultivates a child's imagination and enhances their reading comprehension as they infer meanings and make connections to their own knowledge and experiences.

This wonderful children's story is not merely a story about a small orphaned child, It is an experience of the hopes, fears, and simple innocence of a child's heart. A tale of a child so compelled with the longing to be loved by his own Momma and Papa, that he braves all fear of the unknown for the hope of a new life. It so beautifully depicts the power that innocent love possesses to triumph over the fears and apprehensions of the unknowns in this life..

This book has received the Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies (NCSS/CBC) and is a Reading Rainbow Book


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Through Moon And Stars And Night Skies

From Publishers Weekly

"Let me tell the story this time, Momma," says a small Oriental boy. "Once I was a picture you held in your hand," he begins, and tells how he "flew through night and moon and stars" to his new home. Though frightened, the plucky boy clutches a photograph of his new parents like a talisman throughout the long flight. Finally "the earth rushed up below. / The plane bounced," and the boy sees his new parents holding out their arms. With patience and love, they introduce him to the things he has seen only in pictures--their house, the teddy-bear quilt, the red dog. This touching story is filled with a quiet charm, thanks to newcomer Hale's gentle watercolors and Turner's ( Dakota Dugout ) lyrical, thoughtful text. Ages 4-8.

Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2-- A simple story narrated by a young Southeast Asian boy about his adoption by an American couple ("Let me tell the story this time, Momma. Let me tell how I came to you.") He tells of receiving photographs of his new parents, a white house, and a red dog. He carries them on the long and frightening journey by plane to his new family. At the airport, his new parents hold out their arms to him and take him home. That night, tucked into his quilt with his teddy bear, he sleeps and dreams "of moon and stars and night skies and coming to a room where your arms were always held out to me." This touching, memorable tale is illustrated in warm watercolor-and-ink pictures that gently contrast the narrator's Asian home with his new life in America. It will serve as a meaningful introduction to adoption as well as a starting point for a discussion on cultural transitions. --Pearl Herscovitch, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

What unselfish love one must possess to be able to take a strange little child as their very own!

Your turn - Write a review, add a comment, or debate someone who disagrees with you.

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Love it! Great read.

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  • LeslieBrenner 9 years ago

    That's a beautiful adoption story!

  • EvieJewelry 9 years ago

    Sounds Wonderful, I will have to put this on my Grand Baby's list.

  • RuthCoffee 9 years ago

    Wonderful review, thanks for introducing us to what sounds like a beautiful story.

  • anonymous 9 years ago

    Thank you for this great review, I am now going to buy this book as a birthday present for my grand daughter who was an adopted baby from Red China. Five Stars Rating

  • Teacher Adez7 9 years ago

    If you love great authors and great books written by them? Then you will love this wonderful story about a little adopted boy.

Sorry, not my cup of tea.

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The best line ever:

I went to sleep and dreamed of moon and stars and night skies and coming to a room where your arms were always held out to me.

More books by Ann Turner - Vote for your favorites, or add any I missed.

Here is a wide selection of more great books by Ann Turner

Dust for Dinner (I Can Read Book - Level 3)
Dust for Dinner (I Can Read Book - Level 3)

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-2-Jake and Maggy and their parents live on a farm in Oklahoma where they grow crops, raise animals, and sing and dance to the music on the radio. But when a drought comes and dust storms destroy the land, the family must auction all of their belongings and head to California. They manage to hang on to their radio and their dog as the only reminders of the life they've left behind. With the adults working odd jobs, they make their way across the country and are lucky enough to find a better life in California. Jake's first-person narrative; the use of the radio as a motif to provide continuity; and the realistic, full-color illustrations combine to make this story a well-written introduction to the Depression for beginning readers. No dates are given in the story to provide context or historical background, but this information is included in an author's note at the end.

Jan Shepherd Ross, Dixie Elementary Magnet School, Lexington, KY

Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Gr. 1^-2. In this I Can Read Book, Turner takes a sad episode in history and fashions it into a story that has some depth as well as some drama. It revolves around an Oklahoma family displaced by drought and the Depression. Because the book is divided into chapters, youngsters will get the feeling of reading a "real book," while having the luxury of short sentences, generous leading, and a direct, easy-to-grasp plot line. Realistic, nicely executed illustrations decorate every page, and the book ends on a happy note: Dad finally finds a job in California. Stephanie Zvirin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 
Katie's Trunk
Katie's Trunk

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-5-- As she did in Dakota Dugout (Macmillan, 1985), Turner creates a moment in history with evocative words and poetic images. Here she turns her attention to the period between the Boston Tea Party and the battles that began the American Revolution. Katie, the middle child in a family of Tory sympathizers, senses the impending conflict. When a group of armed neighbors come to their home with the intention of stealing and looting, the family takes refuge in the adjoining woods. The child impulsively dashes back to the house to protect their valuable possessions. When one of the young rebels disturbs her hiding place, he calls off his companions, keeping his discovery a secret. This story presents another side of a moral issue. There were good people loyal to England before and during the Revolution; students should hear their stories as well as those of the more famous and celebrated rebels. Himler's muted watercolor and pencil illustrations convey the mood of the calm before a storm. The details of costume and furnishings further reinforce the sense of place and time. However, the artist gives little attention to individualized facial characteristics, making it difficult to distinguish one person from another. The text and illustrations do blend harmoniously, and together tell a tale of courage, fortitude, and loyalty from the Tory point of view. With spare but eloquent prose, Turner has created a thoughtful picture of a family confronting difficult choices in unsettling times. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY

Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Card catalog description

Katie, whose family is not sympathetic to the rebel soldiers during the American Revolution, hides under the clothes in her mother's wedding trunk when they invade her home. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 
Nettie's Trip South (Aladdin Picture Books)
Nettie's Trip South (Aladdin Picture Books)

From Publishers Weekly

Turner's Dakota Dugout and Third Girl from the Left proved her ability to write of the settlers' hard lives on the Plains. This time she presents, in the form of a sparely written, evocative letter to a friend, a young girl's impressions of the South and her first encounter with slavery. Traveling with her sister and journalist brother, Nettie learns that, according to the Constitution, slaves are only 3/5 people. She looks to see what comprises the 2/5 they are missing. And she meets Tabitha, who only has that one name, "Like a cat or a dog." She throws up when she sees two black children who have to be forcefully separated when they are auctioned off to different owners. Nettie is changed when she returns home. The historical distance makes this fact-based account no less heart-wrenching and realistic. Himler's black-and-white pencil drawings are somber, yet in those scenes of past sorrows, there are glimpses of hope. Ages 6-10.

Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-6 Young Nettie describes her journey to the antebellum South in this picture book based upon a diary of Turner's great-grandmother. Nettie's brother Lockwood goes to Richmond to report on conditions, and Nettie and her sister Julia go along. Nettie meets several slaves, and even attends a slave auction, which so repulses her that she vomits. Turner's story is a compelling and thought-provoking one, sure to arouse readers' sympathies. It also gets inside an evolving abolitionist, a sympathetic view not often explored in Civil War stories. Himler's large pencil illustrations are well rendered and highlight key scenes, enhancing the story. While the book can be used with younger elementary grade children, it will have its widest audience among older readers, who can more clearly see and understand the author's message. Elizabeth M. Reardon, McCallie School, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 
Sitting Bull Remembers
Sitting Bull Remembers

From School Library Journal

Grade 3–6—In this first-person, fictionalized account, Sitting Bull is living in captivity near the end of his life and remembering his past. He longs for the life that Native Americans enjoyed before the coming of the Wasicu, the white people. He talks about the Sioux victory at Little Bighorn and the destruction of the buffalo herds. Turner's writing is lyrical, almost poetic. The story is poignant and sympathetic to the plight of the Native peoples who were driven from their land and forced to live on tiny reservations. They are depicted as brave and noble victims, while white people are the greedy villains who want only gold. The illustrations give a romanticized view of Native American life on the Great Plains, and are similar in style to those in Joseph Bruchac's A Boy Called Slow (Philomel, 1995). Minor includes pictograph images superimposed on the representational art to suggest Sitting Bull's feelings and vision. The well-crafted art adds drama and depth to the story. This book is a mood piece that communicates the injustice of Native American oppression in the 1800s. Those looking for an unbiased, fact-filled account of Sitting Bull's life must look elsewhere, for example, to Ann Todd's Sitting Bull (Capstone, 2002).—Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT

Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Though we fought hard, they built their railroad, / and noise and smoke and greed / came to stay on our land. In this handsome, fictionalized picture-book biography (which is catalogued as nonfiction), spare, moving poetry and beautiful double-page paintings depict Sitting Bull, the chief of the Sioux people, remembering how it was. The chief recalls when he was 14 and first counted coup by striking an enemy warrior's head, and then how it all changed with the arrival of the whites who killed the buffalo and wanted to own the land and sell it, piece by piece. He also remembers Custer, and how the Sioux were hunted and hounded and forced onto the reservation. Then he thinks back to his own surrender. The art includes clear colored-pencil pictures inspired by images of Sitting Bull housed in the Smithsonian Institution. A final note fills in some of the essentials of the rich history. Rochman, Hazel

 
The Girl Who Chased Away Sorrow: The Diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo Girl, New Mexico, 1864 (Dear America)
The Girl Who Chased Away Sorrow: The Diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo Girl, New Mexico, 1864 (Dear America)

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-8-Sarah Nita, 13, tells the story of the Navajo's forced 400-mile Long Walk from their ancestral homeland through winter snow to Fort Sumner. The confusion, fear, and suffering of The People are drawn with clarity and immediacy. A factual afterword gives a larger picture of the times with captioned period photographs of the Navajo. The story is rich with details of Native life gracefully woven into the telling of events. Characterizations are complete, even for minor participants. The publication information is at the rear of the book, as it is for all titles in this series, which has given rise to a general criticism that the stories are easily mistaken for actual period diaries. The CIP classification is 813.54; granted, that is American fiction, but placing this book in the nonfiction section of the library only adds to the confusion. The author's comments allow readers to believe that Sarah Nita was a real girl ("born in 1851"). All the same, it is a compelling story, and its power will attract readers.

Cris Riedel, Ellis B. Hyde Elementary School, Dansville, NY

Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description

In her first book for the Dear America series, acclaimed historical fiction writer Ann Turner brings readers the deeply affecting story of a Navajo girl on the long walk.

 
Hard Hit
Hard Hit

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up–As in Learning to Swim (Scholastic, 2000), Turner addresses an intense subject in lyrical poetry. Mike, 16, has the perfect life–star baseball player, cute girlfriend, and loyal best friend–until the phone call that turns his life upside down. His father has pancreatic cancer. While his friends continue to live their lives, time stands still for Mike. His dad suffers through and begins the wasting away that cancer causes. A short period of remission brings a brief period of celebration. In the end, however, Mike finds that his bargains with God and his attempts to get along better with his sister are all for naught. His father dies and he must find a way to go on with his life. Teens who have experienced serious illness and/or death in their family or with close friends will relate to Turners profound novel that traces the journey of one young man through the stages of grief and recovery. National help lines, addresses, and Web sites are included for readers who need them.–Kathryn Childs, Morris Mid/High School, OK

Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 7-10. Tenth-grader Mark Warren is a golden boy: good friends, a gorgeous girlfriend, and an awesome pitching arm, an arm that his dad has cultivated since Mark was small. Yet all turns gray and meaningless when Mark learns that his father has pancreatic cancer. In a carefully crafted, free-verse narrative, the teen tells of his struggle with faith, hope, and disillusionment as his family watches his father slip away--and the inevitable terror and guilt of those still living. It's a hard, sad, beautifully written book, spare yet with surprisingly well-developed characters. Unlike longer, more complex novels that build layers of emotion through description and events, Turner employs poetry to paint the reality of gradual loss, and the language conveys the absence of all the family has known and its emptiness without its central figure. A short bibliography of resources for children whose parents have died rounds out this special book. Frances Bradburn

Copyright American Library Association. All rights reserved

 
Love Thy Neighbor: the Tory Diary of Prudence Emerson
Love Thy Neighbor: the Tory Diary of Prudence Emerson

Amazon.com

"This is not the life I imagined I would have." So laments Prudence Emerson, an inquisitive, distinctly non-prudent 13-year-old girl from Massachusetts who wants to be cheerful but who must, along with her Tory family, live in fear of her Patriot neighbors in the months leading up to the American Revolution. Like the other books in the Dear America series, Ann Turner's Love Thy Neighbor is recounted in diary form--a fictional diary that reveals the innermost thoughts of a young woman while painting a vivid picture of the times in which she lived. The innate complexities of the conflicts between Tories and Patriots are clearly presented, and readers will certainly gain a new understanding of the challenges of overthrowing foreign rule and beginning a democracy from the rarely explored perspective of a family "on the wrong side" of the war. Readers will also learn about daily colonial life--when bacon came from the pigs one owned, where ink was made from ink powder or maple bark, where girls were expected to embroider, wear corsets, scrub floors, go to church on Sundays, and generally mind their manners. Pru is a strong, spirited heroine whom readers will cheer on as she endures alienation from her Patriot friends, the sickness of her little sister, rising hostility, and ultimately, being uprooted from the home she loves to flee the danger of war.

A note in the back further illuminates life in the Colonies, as do historical illustrations and a note from the author about her own family connection to this turbulent time. Two other fictional diaries set during the Revolutionary War are Kristiana Gregory's Dear America book The Winter of Red Snow: The Revolutionary War Diary of Abigail Jane Stewart and Barry Denenberg's My Name is America book The Journal of William Thomas Emerson: A Revolutionary War Patriot. (Ages 9 to 14) --Karin Snelson

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-7-Prudence Emerson and her family live in Massachusetts in 1774 and are loyal to the English king. Many villagers are Patriots and as they grow weary of the oppressive laws, they begin to turn on their Tory neighbors. Prudence's former friends won't speak to her, someone throws a rock through a window in her house, and Patriots refuse to do business with her father. As the town's dark mood escalates, the Emersons flee to Boston to stay with relatives under the protection of British troops. The author does an outstanding job of showing how Tories became embroiled with their neighbors in a sort of civil war. Prudence is a typical teenager, but she is also loyal to her family's views and frightened by the hostile attitude of her former friends. Details of Colonial life are intricately interwoven, from Prudence's difficulty in obtaining ink to write in her diary to her mother's use of herbs in her midwifery practice. The action and suspense build steadily and will keep readers hooked. A compelling portrait of a "dissenting" voice.

Kristen Oravec, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Strongsville, OH

Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 
Drummer Boy: Marching to the Civil War
Drummer Boy: Marching to the Civil War

From Publishers Weekly

Turner (Dust for Dinner) takes readers to a Civil War battlefield in this disturbing picture book narrated by an idealistic 13-year-old. The premise is much the same as that of Gary Paulsen's novel Soldier's Heart (reviewed July 20); unfortunately, the lessons may be too complex for a picture book audience, at least in this treatment. The narrator, a farm boy, has liked Lincoln ever since he gave a speech in the boy's town, and sometime after war breaks out (no specific time or place is given) the memory of that encounter inspires him to join up. He also wants to free the slaves. Lying about his age, he is enlisted as a drummer boy, asked to march with the troops and "raise a tune for our men in battle." In the heat of bloody confrontation, the boy witnesses the atrocities of war. He holds the hand of a mortally wounded soldier "until his eyes stopped seeing." Poetic turns of phrase further describe how grim reality quickly dims a boy's bright-eyed patriotism. But there are problems here. The passage about slavery seems tacked on, the boy never feels fully real and the most interesting information about drummer boys is relegated to an afterword. The ending misfires: the boy bitterly blames Lincoln for making him "see things no boy should ever see." Hess's (Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero) atmospheric, dramatic scenes capture period touches as well as the serenity of rural life and the action of combat. But he, too, stumbles: while all of the other scenes are carefully lit and detailed, a view of slave quarters is so muddy and imprecise that a slave woman looks shockingly misshapen and simian. Well intended but off the mark. Ages 4-8.

Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-4-After hearing Lincoln speak, a 13 year old is mesmerized by the president's powerful presence and runs away to join the Union Army as a drummer boy. After a quick acceptance by the army, he eagerly dons his uniform and learns how to handle his instrument. The battle scenes are frightening but not terribly gory. The unnamed youngster is understandably disturbed as he witnesses his first deaths. He does not become hardened to the sadness, but he does learn to cope and do his job, relaying orders with his drumbeats and masking some of the agonized battle sounds. Two portraits frame the story. In the first, he is an innocent-looking farm boy wearing a straw hat, a small, anticipatory smile on his lips. By the end of the book, his eyes are shadowed and his mouth is set in a firm line. He has seen "things no boy should ever see." The narrative does not have the emotional pull of George Ella Lyon's Cecil's Story (Orchard, 1991) or the gut-wrenching power of Patricia Polacco's Pink and Say (Philomel, 1994). However, Turner's prose vividly relates the boy's situation in a few well-chosen words set off in small boxes. Paired with Hess's historically illuminating paintings, the result is an informative introduction to the Civil War. It would be a great resource to share with students reading fiction such as G. Clifton Wisler's Mr. Lincoln's Drummer (1995) or Red Cap (1991, both Lodestar).

Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA

Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 
Abe Lincoln Remembers
Abe Lincoln Remembers

Amazon.com

From his humble beginnings in a small log cabin, young Abe Lincoln knew "that being tall is not enough to make your way in this world." He worked hard on a flatboat, in a general store, and then studying to become a lawyer, eventually making his way into politics. Along the way he married and had three boisterous sons: "They were like balls bounding down a road, and people said they had no manners or discipline. I thought happiness more important than manners, though I didn't like it when Tad drove his cart and goats down the White House hall." Deeply relieved when the Civil War is over, Abe Lincoln is finally ready to be happy on the fateful night that he sets out to Ford's Theater to see a play with his wife.

The focus of this simple picture book is not on Lincoln's death--the book concludes before Abe and Mary even leave the White House--but rather on the admirable life he led. Although many are well acquainted with the legendary story of young Abe's rough upbringing in Kentucky and his unquenchable thirst for learning, Ann Turner's fictionalized biography, told in a fresh and immediate first-person point of view, adds a sweet note of poignancy and humanity to one of America's greatest heroes. With his historically accurate paintings, award-winning illustrator Wendell Minor captures the expressions and experiences of a man who, at the conclusion of the war, sees "how sorrow has dug lines in my cheeks." (Ages 6 to 9) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Minor's (Red Fox Running) stately, lifelike paintings and Turner's (Learning to Swim) anecdotal narrativeAwritten in the conversational voice of LincolnAshape an insightful portrait of this leader. The author chronologically organizes the text into accessible vignettes, each accompanied by a finely detailed illustration marked by sharp, nearly photographic definition. Turner emphasizes Lincoln's fascination with words and learning with well-chosen similes (as a lawyer, "I practiced my cases out loud as I walked,/ learning how to use words/ like a leading rein on a colt/ to take people where I wanted"), and stresses his early commitment to end slavery, his unwavering ethics and his profound anguish at the destruction and death caused by the Civil War. Cheerful moments inject some levity into the volume, as when Lincoln describes Mary Todd, the woman who would become his wife ("She was bright and brave/ like a flag cracking in the wind,/ all color, rustle, and shine"), and his son Tad's habit of driving his cart and goats through the White House hall. This well-rounded volume ends on an affecting, ironic note: As Lincoln and his wife "wait to go see a play," he thinks back on his childhood log cabin, reflecting on "how much has come to pass since then. How much there is still to be done." Ages 6-9. (Jan.)

Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 
Learning To Swim
Learning To Swim

Amazon.com

Ann Turner's lyrical Learning to Swim will resonate with any adult or teenager who knows the shame and confusion of sexual molestation. Her memories of a family summer vacation keep coming back "like a skunk dog / on the porch / whining to get in." For Turner, telling her story to the world is what sets that skunk dog running. Divided into three sections, "sailing," "sinking," and "swimming," the book chronicles a holiday trip through the eyes of a very young girl--small enough to use a pink swimming ring in Dresser's Pond, play dress-up, and run races. It's Kevin, an older boy from down the street, with the "hands that grab," who takes her upstairs under the pretense of reading to her ("a secret time for us / and never, ever tell"), and she doesn't even know she can say no. In searingly simple language, Turner walks us through the little girl's forever-altered world, past the place where the truth comes out and healing can begin. (Ages 13 and older) --Karin Snelson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Using spare vignettes laid out like poetry, Turner (Nettie's Trip South) recalls the summer she was six years old, when she was sexually abused by a neighbor. Convincingly assuming a child's voice, the narrative blends Annie's routine activities such as playing with dolls and swimming lessons with darker images of the neighbor boy's transgressions (the boy "telling me to touch him/ in a hard, breathless voice, and I didn't even know/ I could say/ no"). Because Annie lacks the vocabulary to describe what is happening to her, it is her actions that most often imply her emotions (she draws an angry picture, she brushes her teeth five times a day, she tries to hide). Turner also describes Annie's painful longing to confide in someone (she says of her father, "I wish my words/ were smoke/ he could breathe in") but she is silenced by fear of what the neighbor boy's might do if she tellsAuntil Annie's mother extracts the truth. Throughout the volume, the narration shifts, sometimes addressing the reader, a few times her abuser; sometimes speaking in the immediate present and others recalling the recent past. The narrative itself may be at times disjointed, but the emotional truth comes through clearly. If older readers can get past the youth of the narrator they will likely appreciate the poetic voice and courage of the heroine. Ages 12-up. (Oct.)

Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 

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      abacct 6 years ago

      Hey nicely decorated lens, you've got...

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      chrissuard lm 6 years ago

      Amazing book, blessed by a Squid Angel.

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      rachsue lm 6 years ago

      Sounds like a great book to add to our collection. Great lens, love the layout

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      tandemonimom lm 8 years ago

      Welcome to the newly revamped and under-new-management Homeschooling Group!

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      tandemonimom lm 8 years ago

      This sounds like an absolutely lovely book! I am going to have to find it at my library. 5* and THANK YOU for all the angelic blessings!

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      religions7 8 years ago

      Don't know this book. Checked out your profile & clicked this link thinking it was a songtitle :) what do you know... Sounds like a great read though.

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      julieannbrady 8 years ago

      You know, I really like this template and simply must create a lens that requires it as you've done a splendid job of lenscraftery -- no rubber bands were harmed in the creation of this lens. ;)

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      LeslieBrenner 9 years ago

      That's a great book to read your adopted child, so they learn the story of how they got their forever family. 5 star lens.

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      Aika 9 years ago

      wonderful lens, book looks inspiring.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      Another awesome job Adez! A person could spend an hour just here reading!

    • EvieJewelry profile image

      EvieJewelry 9 years ago

      Wonderful lensmegag

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      rockycha 9 years ago

      Wow! So In Depth! Great SquidleLittle!!!

    • evelynsaenz1 profile image

      Evelyn Saenz 9 years ago from Royalton

      Ann Turner's books are some of my favorites. I especially loved Dakota Dugout when looking for sequals to the Little House books. Thank you for reminding me of Ann Turner. I an looking forward to reading Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies.

      You might like to check out Garner Rix and the Royalton Raid for more historical fiction for children and Starry Starry Night for star related activities.

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      RuthCoffee 9 years ago

      Great gift idea here.

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      flowski lm 9 years ago

      Wonderful book rewiew of Ann Turners Book, Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies. Thanks to your review, I'm mioving it up to "next" on my list of books to read and I can hardly wait, thanks!