ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Cheap Ways to Remodel a House

Updated on June 26, 2012

From outside, no one knows we test missiles here.

A pic of our house from when we came and first looked at it.
A pic of our house from when we came and first looked at it. | Source

Do House Repairs Give You a Headache?


When most people think of remodeling a house, they get a headache. If you’ve ever attempted to do some sort of remodeling project for the first time, you learn that you don’t own the right tools. Even if you think you own every tool known to man, there’ll be some sort of super-specialty tool you’ll use once for 5 minutes that you have to have. It will also cost a large pile of your local currency to own.

Tool Rental and the Evil Floor

Here's your author seeing what a tiny belt sander will do to the goop on the floor under the laminate.
Here's your author seeing what a tiny belt sander will do to the goop on the floor under the laminate. | Source
Here's the floor at the end of weekend 1.  It still needs a lot of work.
Here's the floor at the end of weekend 1. It still needs a lot of work. | Source
Here's the floor prior to sanding the sealer and being done.  It's quite a world away from where it started.
Here's the floor prior to sanding the sealer and being done. It's quite a world away from where it started. | Source

Tool Rental Saves Money When Remodeling


However, you can also check around and see if there are local places that will rent tools. Often smaller contractors don’t own some of the more expensive tools that are only called for occasionally. Floor sanding is one of these things.

If you try and sand an entire room with a small belt sander, it’ll take forever. I assume it will, ‘cause my wife and I went, “How long would it take to sand this floor with Doug’s little belt sander?” The answer was: we went and rented a big drum sander.

The room we picked to refinish was rather strange: it had a laminate floor over a hardwood floor. However, the hardwood had evidence (and residue) from what appeared to be both carpet and tile. Since our house was built in 1947, there was no way to tell how many layers of glue, epoxy, and who-knows-what were on top of the hardwood.

If we’d picked any other room in the house, we’d probably have been able to sand it in a day. However, it took two weekends of working like a maniac to get rid of the black crud of the ages and expose the wood. By the time I was through sanding, I could say to my wife, “I really like that tiger-striped board,” and she would know exactly which one I was talking about.

In the end we refinished two rooms, the one with the laminate and the master bedroom. The total cost for the refinishing—counting our time at $0/hr—was probably under $250. I cannot even begin to estimate what it would have cost to have had this done by a contractor--$1000 or more for the bad room if they even would have touched it is my guess. Both rooms turned out great.

Don't Fall Through Your Ceiling!

I was lucky I didn't kill myself when I fell through the living room ceiling.  Here's the aftermath.
I was lucky I didn't kill myself when I fell through the living room ceiling. Here's the aftermath. | Source

Lower Utility Bills Through Remodeling


We then moved on to making it a little cheaper to live in the house. We were a bit concerned when we moved because the new house was twice the square footage of the old house. It wasn’t that the new house was gigantic; it’s that our first house was tiny. It was almost impossible to sell our first house because of it’s size.

I decided that the best two things I could do to reduce bills would be to add insulation to the attic and to install an exterior tank-less water heater. I chose to go with a roll-in insulation instead of spray in just because it looked easier. From what I read, the concern about putting roll insulation over older insulation was that you would compress the old insulation and make it less effective.

My reasoning was that the amount of compression that happened would be negligible, so I went full steam ahead with the insulation. While I can’t say how it worked in terms of improving the previous heating and cooling costs—we never saw the old bills for before we did the upgrade—my feeling is that we made a tremendous improvement, as the bills were about the same as they had been at the old house.

The only thing that happened that was dangerous/stupid and preventable was that I tripped and fell through the ceiling. That led to a ceiling repair, but no medical bills. The only advice I have is this: slow down, watch where you put your feet, and remember where stuff is buried under insulation that you’re walking on.

As for the hot water heater: unless you have experience with plumbing black pipe, leave that part to the professionals. My father and I got it done easily, but we'd both been down that road before.

Bathroom Wall Addition and Tub Enclosure

Here's the roughed in wall before the shower enclosure was put up--note that it didn't have to be perfect, as it would be covered by the enclosure.
Here's the roughed in wall before the shower enclosure was put up--note that it didn't have to be perfect, as it would be covered by the enclosure. | Source
Here's the same spot with the enclosure up. The tape is temporary until the adhesive dries--another one of the many times you'll wait while remodeling.
Here's the same spot with the enclosure up. The tape is temporary until the adhesive dries--another one of the many times you'll wait while remodeling. | Source

Bathroom Remodel's on the Cheap


The final thing we’ve worked on lately is a partial bathroom remodel. The original porcelain bathtub was discolored enough that it couldn’t be made to look clean. It would be clean, but look dirty. The tiles immediately over the tub also looked horrible and I feared that they would be mold-bearing walls.

I had to remove the tiles from the wall and the cement that was poured behind them. I then removed the tub, toilet, and tore down the old storage closet that was too deep to be useful. I had to then sheetrock the walls and build a partial wall between the tub and toilet for the new tub enclosure we’d picked out.

Installing the tub and enclosure were easy to do. I did have to lengthen the copper pipe that led to the shower head, as it was installed at chest height for my wife and I. I did learn the importance of REALLY cleaning old copper before soldering/sweating it. I’d only sweated new pipe before, so it took me a little while to understand how clean it needed to be.

That’s a key—when you’re working with a lot of these things, if the instructions say clean, they generally do mean CLEAN. They don’t mean, sort of wiped off. Believe me, you don’t want to do something 2 or three times because you skipped a step that would have cost you an extra minute or two.

Leveling the floor was a bit of a challenge. The tubs of “Floor Leveling Compound” that I’d read about were next to useless: you had to spend forever to stir them. When they dried, they were just sandy spots that barely stuck together. The best luck I had was just using shims under the plywood floor panels and a level. I then did what the tile adhesive instructions said not to do—used thicker adhesive in spots to help level the tiles as I laid them in.

While I still have to lay the tile back on the half-wall I built to be finished with the job, it took about a week of labor to do. Mind you, it was spread over about a month. You’re always waiting for something to dry. It made me understand why construction seems to take so long sometimes: almost everything you touch has a 24-48 hour drying time.

We bought an off-the-shelf kitchen pantry cabinet to use for the towel closet. It took a little cutting on the wall to make it work, but we now have some shelving that’s actually useable.

The entire bathroom remodel—tub, enclosure, glass sliding doors for the tub, wall, new floor, and new closet will come in at under $1500. We could have gone with cheaper components or skipped something like the glass doors and come in cheaper, but we wanted something we’d be happy with. Since the local ReBath franchise had given us about a $5000 quote for the tub alone, I cannot even guess at how much this would have been if we’d hired it out.

Oh, and go watch The Money Pit before you get started. It’ll keep it all in perspective. And no, I have no desire to remodel anything right now, thanks.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • rfmoran profile image

      Russ Moran - The Write Stuff 5 years ago from Long Island, New York

      Sage, evergreen advice. Yes, by all means watch The Money Pit for motivation before embarking on a major project. Voted up and useful.

    • Om Paramapoonya profile image

      Om Paramapoonya 5 years ago

      Nice hub! My mom has been thinking about remodeling her house. I'll share these tips with her. And by the way, I really like the first picture. Your home looks lovely!

    • watergeek profile image

      watergeek 5 years ago from Pasadena CA

      Interesting and lighthearted. I totally get you with the laminate flooring - good job on it, by the way. I've used a rented sander before, and I have to say it was kind of fun controlling that runaway thing.

    • Sherry Hewins profile image

      Sherry Hewins 5 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

      The floor looks great, glad you didn't kill yourself. Voted up, useful and shared.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)