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Ditch the Concrete: 6 Innovative Options for Driveways

Updated on September 12, 2017
RTalloni profile image

Robertatalloni means creativity. Whether in writing or in more typical art forms artistry (and a bit of fun) must be part of the work.

When recreating driveways and parking areas choose from new alternatives that allow water to soak into green spaces rather than become typical run off.
When recreating driveways and parking areas choose from new alternatives that allow water to soak into green spaces rather than become typical run off. | Source

Changing Our Thinking on Driveways

As developed societies become more affluent and the ability to generate new products evolves, being good stewards of the world we live in is essential. We have the resources to do an excellent job of taking care of the earth we live on and driveway alternatives are a place where every home owner can improve their stewardship.

The quote about how small changes can make a big difference is true where driveways are concerned. Initially, changes may need to be uncomplicated ones such as repairing or replacing a driveway apron but if a new home is being considered taking time to explore driveway options can provide some beneficial surprises.

A remodel is also a great opportunity to incorporate one of the newly developed options. Expanding outdoor living spaces, turning them into multi-use areas, recreating places that both children and grownups enjoy can all include the need to remake a driveway.

Driveways Past and Present

For the most part, from the very beginning of their production concrete driveways have been just plain ugly. If they were beautiful, individuals and companies would not have such good success with inventing ways to alter the look of the raw slabs.

From paint to stamps to stains to edgings to planters and more, attempts to make concrete driveways more appealing are a grand effort. Costs for those applications vary greatly depending on how much DIY homeowners are willing to put into the project or if they decide to pay for labor to have it done professionally.

When it’s time to replace failed concrete or when a new home is being built, though, other choices are available. There are now products that change not only the face but also the usefulness of the places we drive on to get from roads to our carports and garages.

Those areas should be as attractive and as earth friendly as possible. Happily, the following ideas are not just doable, they are affordable (some remarkably so), whether applied to new construction or to a remodel.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Asphalt breaking away from concrete--the two should never have been paired.Broken chunks like this will be easy to reuse as a foundation for a fire pit.These two surfaces did not bind together.Old concrete crumbling along the sides of a vintage driveway.
Asphalt breaking away from concrete--the two should never have been paired.
Asphalt breaking away from concrete--the two should never have been paired. | Source
Broken chunks like this will be easy to reuse as a foundation for a fire pit.
Broken chunks like this will be easy to reuse as a foundation for a fire pit. | Source
These two surfaces did not bind together.
These two surfaces did not bind together. | Source
Old concrete crumbling along the sides of a vintage driveway.
Old concrete crumbling along the sides of a vintage driveway. | Source

My husband and I have looked at the options for a remodel that includes replacing a 50 year old asphalt and concrete driveway. It is a long bunch of surfacing that we do not want replaced entirely with new concrete. We plan to incorporate new green spaces in the design.

You can imagine what it looks like with previous homeowners having tried to use the stinky, sticky black stuff to repair the hard white/greyish stuff! Pleasantly surprised at the number of products with high rain absorption rates, we think we’ve worked our way through them all and made our decision.

While a new option may be on the horizon, meaning the decision could change by the time we get to that phase, we are able to move forward now. Confident that our chosen option is going to make a huge difference in every aspect of our property's usefulness and appearance, we are ready to get the needed permit.


6 Options for Friendly Driveways

1) In Santa Monica an example of breaking up a concrete driveway into what looks like slate rock tiles shows a quick and easy fix for an existing slab that keeps water from soaking into the ground. Compared to some other options this is a fast solution. The grassy areas are obviously penetrable spaces for water to soak in rather than run off. If I chose this method I would definitely use a stain treatment to make the tiles look more like slate.

2) A split driveway, often referred to as a ribbon driveway, is not a new idea. That these runners can lead to a nice landing for foot traffic makes them very appealing, and again porous lawn areas prevent water from flowing into drainage systems. The strips, runners, or ribbons (whatever you choose to call them) can be created from a current driveway, much like the slate/tile-like example above. This option can also be incorporated into a renovation or new construction. PermaTurf is a product worth looking at before installing a split driveway. Using porous asphalt could also be a possibility for a split driveway (see number 4 below).

A simple sketch of your driveway plans can help you decide what kind of surfacing you want to use.
A simple sketch of your driveway plans can help you decide what kind of surfacing you want to use. | Source

3) A gravel bed made of pea gravel or crushed stone, crush and run being commonly used, is a tried and true option but the old method is not without its drawbacks. Today there are functional and pretty ways to use gravel. Combining it with modern stone look pavers that are actually new methods of allowing water to percolate into the ground (see below) and prevent gravel from shifting is a must consider update. New products like EcoGrid also offer homeowners a more stable option for gravel driveways than they’ve had in the past.

4) Pervious asphalt, originally from the 70s era, is now greatly improved, with research and development continuing. As with some other permeable surfaces for driveways, communities may offer incentives in the form of grants, tax benefits, and additional help to promote the use of filtration pavements. Though current asphalt products would not be suitable for our upcoming project, the reading I’ve done causes me to look forward to what may yet be developed to make this a real contender among homeowners.

5) Permeable pavers are available from several sources. Loved because they permit water to filter down into the earth instead of making muddy messes, causing erosion, and moving various chemicals into natural water sources, this paver replacement is a great run off solution. Widely used industrially and by homeowners, the range of quality should be well researched before making a decision on which to use. Significantly lowering the impact on newly developed areas, porous pavers' popularity is rising. (Say that 5 times fast!)

6) My favorite solution so far allows grass to grow and thrive in the driveway areas. Drivable Grass is a DIY option that I have fallen so much in love with that I have cast my vote for this choice in our new project. Softening hardscape spaces by using a system that solves problems and gives me the green stuff has to be at the top of the list. Even though we are also incorporating some ribbons and permeable pavers, grass that works as a driveway is my top choice.

Other options in this category include TrueGrid’s green permeable paving solution that is tough enough for fire engine lanes and Home Depot’s concrete grass mat for savvy DIY types who want a plantable driveway. Grasscrete’s self-venting paving system bears up to 40 tonnes of gross vehicle weight and Canadians have access to Core Grass for low-impact parking. Grass paving systems are evolving and sometimes, simpler is better--don’t miss this turf protection mesh from the UK.

Though it is exciting to consider what will be available as technology develops new products, all of the great choices presented here have positive applications that homeowners can benefit from and enjoy on a long term basis. Keeping an eye on developments in the making will help you plan for the day that the concrete you now have must be replaced. That's a happy thought now that we have great alternatives!


If you were choosing a new driveway for your property, which would be your first choice?

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Caring for Your Driveway, Patio, or Walkway


Search HubPages for more information:

• Good advice on taking care of your brick paving work.

• Learn about using different kinds of pressure washers.

• See a method for an easy care faux paint walkway.

Easy-on-the-Homeowner Grasses...


• Check out small yard solutions and make the most of your outdoor spaces!

© 2014 RTalloni

Were you aware of these driveway alternatives before reading this hub?

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    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 6 months ago from Brazil

      Our driveway and parking area desperately need sorting out. We have clay and sand with a few pebbles mixed in, it's a nightmare. With trees around it, we have roots, leaves and well it's just a mess.

      I like the idea of one which can channel water away.

      Good overview of several which are available.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 17 months ago from the short journey

      Au fait:

      So appreciate that you read and added your comment here. Thinking outside the box helps us realize that we don't have to do driveways the same way as they've always been done. In many cases, there are better ways!

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 17 months ago from North Texas

      This is a very useful article with great ideas. If it needs to be replaced why not consider one of these other options? And if a new home is being built it's the perfect time to choose something a little different. Lots of people are spiffing up their yards now and sometimes that includes the driveway if it is old, or hasn't held up well over time. This article could be just what they're looking for to get some new ideas.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 22 months ago from the short journey

      KoffeeKlatch Gals:

      Though I think part of the description was cut off, I hope we get to see pics of your project in a hub describing the process. Tremendous thanks for letting me know that this hub was useful to you. Happy New Year to your and yours!

    • KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

      Susan Haze 22 months ago from Sunny Florida

      drive way and piecing it to look like an English cottage drive way. I think I would put pea rock between the concrete pieces. Wonderful hub, it really got me thinking.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      Thanks much for taking a look at the driveway options in this hub and leaving your feedback on the ideas. Our big project has progressed more slowly than expected due to "life" (a common DIY issue) so we are still looking forward to this phase. When (if!) we get that far I hope to update this hub and include photos.

    • wilderness profile image

      Dan Harmon 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

      Our old (45 year) concrete driveway is nearing the end of it's life and needs major repairs. We've looked at options, but never a "lawn" driveway - I love it! This, in it's variations, definitely goes on the list.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      MarleneB

      Thanks kindly for your feedback on the concept of driveway options that ditch concrete slabs!

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 2 years ago from Northern California, USA

      These are all such wonderful ideas. I like the idea that they are economical and promote tender treatment of the environment.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      The Dirt Farmer:

      Thanks for letting me know that this was informative for you! Oh how much I would love to show off the completed project! When beginning a project this large it would be nice if the rest of life could be put on hold so the phases could be completed quickly. Being huge on DIY but not as strong as when we were younger for previous projects, this one is requiring patience… :) However, if we survive it I do hope to post some pics eventually.

    • The Dirt Farmer profile image

      Jill Spencer 2 years ago from United States

      Drivable grass is a new one on me. What a great idea! Would love to see your competed project.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      sgbrown:

      Yes, I think if my driveway were 1/4 mi long it would also be gravel! There are new ways of making gravel style driveways that you might want to check into one day. We live in amazing times of developing new ways to approach old problems!

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      FlourishAnyway:

      Something about a country driveway says home, doesn't it? :)

      Pea gravel isn't a bad option, but it can be bothersome to walk on, especially in dress shoes or for the elderly. There are a lot of personal-use factors to consider when making the choice.

      Thanks for stopping in!

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 2 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      Since buying our first home, we have always had a gravel driveway. Our driveway now is 1/4 mile long and concrete or asphalt is not an option. We do add gravel to the long driveway every year. You have some great options for smaller driveways here!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      When I lived in the country, I enjoyed simple gravel for a driveway. Now that I live in a development, they so restrict what we can use, although pea gravel is an option.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      PegCole17:

      Viva your solution! What a great idea to reuse the railroad track rock, and how neat to have those old spikes. I would use them to make a hanging rack for a porch, or any number of shabby chic items. Thanks much for checking out these options for adding your comment to the discussion!

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Environmentally friendly driveways would save so much rainwater that otherwise runs off into the city sewer. I like the look of the permeable pavers. Out here in the country, our driveway is several hundred feet to the house. We incorporated a bed of white rock covered with recycled ballast rock from railroad tracks that were being removed. We've found some really interesting things in the driveway including hundred year old railroad spikes.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      CelebrateUSA:

      Thanks for stopping in with info on how Chicago is working with a new option for concrete! Maybe we'll see more info on their specific project(s) in one of your hubs?

    • CelebrateUSA profile image

      Ken Kline 2 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

      RTalloni

      I just read something about concrete installed in the City of Chicago that "greens" the earth. I am curious about the science surrounding this and with your Hub being the first time I ever considered this as an option, I just had to stop by and share with you.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      BWD316:

      Thank you for checking this out and responding to help highlight the alternatives, and the whys for them!

    • BWD316 profile image

      Brian Dooling 2 years ago from Connecticut

      So many great options and all would help with storm water runoff! Imagine if some parking lots used these various methods!! So much water runoff would be prevented! Out waterways would be so much more cleaner and healthier! Great hub!

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      rebeccamealey:

      If only we could do all we want with all the new options available for driveways today! :)

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      colorfulone:

      Thanks kindly. I appreciate both your visit and knowing that the info was useful to you. Maybe we'll get to read about your solution in a hub!

    • colorfulone profile image

      Susie Lehto 2 years ago from Minnesota

      This is first an amazing hub, RTalloni. The black topped driveway is needed some repairs here, and you have offered many different options to think about. - Thank you.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      pstraubie48:

      So appreciate knowing that this post was useful to you--and I hope your kids! :) "Modern" driveways across the country (from the 50s/60s) are now deteriorating and we need to be looking at the best options for replacement so I also appreciate your helping to highlight the topic with your feedback.

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      I'm with you! I like the driveway with the grass!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Thank you so much for writing such an indepth article on this topic. My daughter and son-in-laws drive way is a mess...pot holes large enough for a small car to be lost in forever. So I am sharing this with them so they can make some decisions.

      Voted up++++ Pinned and Shared

      Angels are on the way to you this morning ps

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      CelebrateUSA:

      That's very cool! Would love to see photos. Why don't you document the process with photos and interviews and make a hub for us?

      Sounds like your place could benefit from one of the alternatives in this hub. Beginning with the first option mentioned might be a good place to start. You can follow the links to see more about it.

      Heating the drivable grass to keep it alive doesn't seem possible. Surely there are grasses that make it through the winter there? Or does everyone reseed their lawns each year? I've only lived in the south so I would not be familiar with the issues--they are actually unimaginable to me. Check with a nursery in your area for the best info.

      Thanks much for stopping in with your comment.

    • CelebrateUSA profile image

      Ken Kline 2 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

      RTalloni,

      My neighbor is installing drivable grass. I am anxious to see this. I am uncertain how it will work with our Midwestern winters. I am hoping that the drivable grass could be heated with solar power.

      Our Victorian home (circa 1928) sadly has more driveway than the gardener in me cares for so this list of possible alternatives is near and dear to my heart.

      Any thoughts on the ability to heat the drivable grass? Am I asking for too much?

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      CherylsArt:

      Making the right choice would definitely include issues like the amount of winter snowfall homeowners get! We get so little that it's nearly a non-factor, but weighing having to mow more area as opposed to having a solid surface would be an issue for some in our area. There is a lot to think through, but the opportunity to make the best decision is worth the effort. Thanks much for your visit and comment on these driveway options!

    • CherylsArt profile image

      Cheryl Paton 2 years ago from West Virginia

      Drivable grass is a new one to me. I like the idea of permeable asphalt. It would be easier to clear off the snow come winter time.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      anglnwu:

      Thanks so much for stopping in to check out these alternatives to concrete slabs! We are in the process of making final decisions on how to incorporate several of these options for a replacement/addition project. I hope to eventually add photos of finished areas.

    • anglnwu profile image

      anglnwu 3 years ago

      We've pavers now but the drivable grass sounds like a neat idea. I like that it's green and looks natural. Thanks for sharing all these options. Rated up.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Peggy W :

      Thanks much for helping to highlight these options for homeowners. Hopefully, when we install a better driveway I'll be able to get a report from the inspector on how much of an environmental improvement the project is and get that posted.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      It is wonderful to know that more permeable products are being created so that water can go into the earth instead of adding to runoff problems. Happy to share this with HP followers and also giving this a tweet.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      AudreyHowitt:

      Thanks bunches for letting me know this was useful to you. Hope we'll get to hear about your decision and how the project works out.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      Some really good ideas--we are in the middle of trying to figure this issue out for ourselves--so this was a welcome read!

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Adventuretravels:

      Thanks much for letting me know you like some of these alternatives. In your case, I wonder if you could not remove portions of the concrete to use as planting areas until you get to a point where you can replace the concrete as you wish. The portions removed can often be used for everything from edging green areas to making fire pits or pathways. I am planning to use some chunks to make a fire pit/fire place and to direct water on a slope in another area so runoff is minimized.

    • Adventuretravels profile image

      Giovanna Sanguinetti 3 years ago from London UK

      I have a lot of cold concrete in my garden and I just don't have a clue what I'll do with it! It sits right outside my back door! Can't afford to spend a fortune! I like your ideas here especially the grass you can drive on and the environmentally sound concrete. Thanks for sharing.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Thanks so much for stopping back in and for sharing about how well your elderly neighbor is doing. Though it is sad that he has no family, I also love to hear of the resiliency of such people. And he knows an inspiring secret of growing old well--enjoying the day and the people he does have in his life since he wasn't blessed with his own family, keeping busy with his farmer tasks and more, I'm sure. He sounds lovely and you can tell him hello from cyber-space! :) You are most welcome for the links. It took me a while to learn that they can be useful in comments and I'm glad to know you are sharing the poem with your friend. You've reminded me that the opportunity to exchange information so easily is still so new--since 1995ish, I think?

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      wow, Roberta, I sure enjoyed getting this meaty response back from my few comments on this article! Thank you for the interesting links-- I really do admire the Babushkas for their faith and perseverence. I often wonder what motivates older people with few family supports to continue to thrive. We have an 86-year old neighbour who "farms" (like an urban farmer, although we are semi-rural) his acre behind us, with beautiful roosters and hens, flowers, fruit trees, and the best organic veggie garden in the area-- he has been a (childless) widower for several years. I'm thinking because he has always been a kind neighbour, sharing tips and produce, he has 'attracted' kind neighbours to him, and they have become his family. Or, perhaps some people do not "need" family in the way many of us seem to? Too, I am forwarding the link to the John Piper website to a friend of mine who will love it! Thanks again for the 'bonus' exchange!

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Roberta, thank YOU for the links to the interesting articles. I admire those Babushkas, as well. I am currently fascinated by older people I know who thrive inspite of not having the requisite bio family to support them in their sundown years. The neighbour behind us is 86, has been a widower for several years (decades?), and has the best garden in the neighbourhood. He's up at the crack of dawn to feed his chickens, then on with the various "farmer" tasks. No kids, no grandkids, etc., just a little dog and those chickens!

      Where do your grandkids live? You are right-- they do live "in the Shadow of the Almighty".

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Dear Roberta-- Thank you for your pithy and fullsome response to my comments-- nothing quite like being mentored, however it comes up! I am forwarding the link to John Piper's site to my friend who is doing some heavy-duty healing work and who will love this!

      I admire the perseverance of the babushkas and that article adds to my current thought-banking about older people who thrive inspite of NOT having the support of biological families. My 86-year old neighbour has been a widower for decades. He has no children, and only a neice and nephew who I don't think he has much contact with (if any). And yet he is up at the crack of dawn, feeding his chickens. He has the best garden anywhere around here, and makes a bit of wine. He plays cards once a week with some cronies (or did) and watches sports on TV, simple pleasures for sure! His little dog is his only company. He has attracted the friendship of neighbours because he is easy-going and throws out rustic, sometimes hilarious, advice, much like the babushkas. He just stays living where he has lived for nearly 60 years. I'm fascinated by him, and others like him.

      And I like your adherence to the self-healing world philosophy. The article about the regrowth at Mt. St. Helen's is hopeful. And strangely, the idea that the native seeds and birds, etc., do better than those they tried to introduce after the "devastation" is comforting.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      techygran:

      How I wish our driving/parking areas were in good enough shape to be able to reuse that way, but they are a mess. I do hope to use some concrete pieces as part of an outdoor fireplace/firepit, yet that project is futuristic at this point.

      One of the saddest examples of what you mention above that I've ever witnessed was how WDW and its presence changed the face of the Central Florida I grew up in. For all their eco emphasis, what was destroyed in the process won't return soon. If we look back at history, though, we can see that the earth really was designed to renew itself.

      In the grand scheme of things, what man does is relatively short lived (though we will be held accountable for either being good stewards of the earth or not). Even though WDW stays on top of making things look good with loads of paint and employees to repair structures, underneath, unseen in the ground, even its foundations are aging--not even concrete is permanent (as my driveway attests).

      As heartbreaking as the events noted below were (and that's an understatement) reports like the following contradict the arrogance of politics-based science promoting the idea that man can control outcomes for what was divinely planned --

      http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/10/ca...

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/96464...

      Then we have historical and recent Mt. St. Helens-esque examples all over this fallen world that is filled with trouble and danger, even inside itself --

      http://www.americanforests.org/blog/geology-vs-eco...

      I somewhat relate to the babushkas' perspective of not letting the situation upend them (in the second link above) because my grandchildren live in two different volcanic regions, in the shadow of major ones, actually.

      Though we are supposed to be busy with the lives God gives us, working and creating and seeking knowledge and finding solutions to problems--

      http://www.desiringgod.org/poems/pilgrim-s-conflic...

      -- when I think of the fact that they live there, rather than worry I rejoice that more importantly, they live in the Shadow of the Almighty and their watch care for time and for eternity, in life and in death, is a charge He has laid upon Himself.

      Well, thanks for a thought-provoking comment! I didn't expect my thinking to quite take this turn today, but it is a wonderful thing to contemplate that though we are very small, God is very big, and if we trust Him according to His Word, we can have peace amid the storms of life. I am thankful to have experiences with His amazing help in a wide variety of problems, even in figuring out how to be a good steward of the land He has given us.

    • techygran profile image

      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      RTalloni,

      I am so impressed with the research you've done and the beautiful presentation of this hub. And I would like to get out next week and break down my old concrete driveway into paving stones. However, I am married to someone who will have a few words to add to the dialogue, I'm sure.

      Besides the issue of run off pollution, I attended a talk at a Seedy Sunday weekend a few years ago where one of the day's speakers addressed the "dead ground" that results when anything as impermeable as cement or asphalt is laid down. It's another example of how the many ecosystems we've taken over have been displaced, at best, and obliterated at worst. Many species of local pollinators have become extinct because they no longer have a 'rough' spot of ground to live in due to our manicured yards with their sterile miles of cement and concrete and asphalt. Well, no pollinators, soon no life. Your hub gave me an alternative perspective to consider to giving up a car and planting up the driveway in tomatoes (it gets the best southern exposure on our lot).

      Well done! Voted up, sharing and pinning!

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      moonlake:

      Your description makes me wish once again that we could post photos in comments for it would be delightful to see the fawns playing in their pond! :)

      Thanks much for your visit and for letting me hear from you. Let us know how it works out if you ever make a change in the driveway.

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      Our drive-way has one big hole that collects water. We have had so much rain it looks like a lake. The deer come to drink out of it and the fawns play in it so they must think it is a lake.

      Interesting hub voted up.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      AudreyHowitt:

      Thanks much, and good for you! Would love to see what you plant in the side area. I'm thinking of filling in with easy care liriope or mondo grass. Though they are too tall for the center of the runners, they would be so easy to maintain in other green areas that are sloped.

    • RTalloni profile image
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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      PhoenixV:

      The new products that can now be used are exciting to think about. I like the look of pea gravel a lot, too, except in areas where solid footing is needed for walking, especially in dress shoes. Breaking long ribbon driveway runners up with pea gravel spaces could be very attractive.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      Helpful! We have the minimal amount of concrete needed to allow the tires to drive up on it--but lots of grass between and a lot of side area that I am thinking about planting--

    • PhoenixV profile image

      PhoenixV 3 years ago from USA

      I never really thought of different options for driveways besides the usual asphalt or concrete. I really liked the idea of incorporating pea gravel.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Nancy Owens:

      Thank kindly for your visit and feedback! I hope we'll get to hear about the project you are planning.

    • Nancy Owens profile image

      Nancy Owens 3 years ago from USA

      Very useful article here. The permeable asphalt sounds interesting for the next project I am thinking about.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      roshall:

      Thanks very much for sharing your experience with replacing your driveway here. I hope one of the new solutions can be your next choice!

    • roshall profile image

      roshall 3 years ago from Ohio

      Wonderful! ! I have replaced mine twice in ten years. Lesson well learned several thousand dollars later.

    • RTalloni profile image
      Author

      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Dolores Monet:

      I was delighted to learn of the new products available to home owners for recreating driveways and parking spaces and am so looking forward to the changes we are planning. Patience…. :)

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      Dolores Monet 3 years ago from East Coast, United States

      I'd love to have a permeable driveway. Ours is asphalt and really looks a mess. We keep saying that we need to have it repaired but I'd really love to have it gone. The grass driveway, though, seems the prettiest.

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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      MsDora:

      The thought of lovely grass where once there was solid concrete has me a little crazy-excited… :) but I have to stay calm because it is a process to get there. Maybe I'll throw a lawn party for all my hub readers! Thanks much for stopping in to check out these options.

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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      teaches12345:

      Drivable grass is a very exciting option to me for our needs. We'll have to do our project in stages in order to establish the grass but it will be worth it. I hope we'll get to see some before and after photos of your son's project, no matter what he chooses to solve the problems with. Thanks for stopping in to check out the products that give us these viable options!

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Driveable grass would be my pick too. Thanks for presenting these options. Voted Useful!

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      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      Driveable grass is an interesting option. My son is in the process of putting in grass and a driveway at his new home. I will have to pass on this idea to him.

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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      AliciaC:

      So appreciate your visit and feedback on this hub. It's exciting to think of what people will come up with next as technology continues to develop!

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      RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

      Millionaire Tips:

      Thanks much for letting me know these solutions interest you. Maybe we'll here about how you resolve your need in a hub on the project--yes, that's a hint. :)

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      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is a very useful hub, RTalloni. I love the fact that you have incorporated the idea of using environmentally friendly ways to replace a driveway. I didn't realize that there were so many great solutions to a driveway problem.

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      Shasta Matova 3 years ago from USA

      These are interesting solutions - I am trying to think of what I want to do with my driveway as well.