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DIY - Kitchen Table

Updated on February 2, 2016

Just Sold

I am very pleased to say that this item was just sold to a lady that lives in my local area. She is very happy with it, and I am now in the process of making her matching accessories to complete her home. you can look me up on Facebook, Google+, and Pinterest if you are interested in my work.

The finished product
The finished product | Source

Tools For Each Step

(click column header to sort results)
Step 1 Sanding  
Step 2 Staining  
Step 3 Painting  
Electric sander
small and medium brushes
small and medium paint brushes
coarse, medium, and fine sanding pads
dark stain
can of paint
regular sand paper
light stain
can of sealer
rags
rags
rags
 
paint thinner
 

Best Price

Online shopping is through the roof, because of the significant amount of money people are saving these days. That is why I took the liberty of placing a few items on this site that you will need, and it is all from Amazon! It doesn't get any easier than that.

Tools for the Table

You will need to purchase an electric sander. I chose a round sander. It's best to purchase different grits of sand paper such as, fine, medium, and coarse. It doesn't matter if its the round type or the square ones. I looked at the types of sand paper that was available for both types and decided on the round one. They may even be labeled by number. I didn't have any directions to go by. I just had to figure it out myself which called for a lot of trial and error. You can also buy the sanders that catch all of your dust as you go. Its best to sand outside in a well ventilated area, but some times your piece may be to large and heavy to move around. I use an empty room. This allows me to keep my pieces out of the weather, and I just sweep and mop before I stain. I always use my ceiling fan, which is necessary for the drying process. The coarse sandpaper allows you to get through the top coat of your table. As soon as you break through that top layer, you need to change to the medium. This will allow you to still make a lot of progress without applying new scratches to your table. Once you begin to see the original color of the wood, you need to apply the fine sandpaper to your sander. Make sure to get all the original color sanded out before you change to the fine grit sandpaper. The fine grit will allow you to slowly get through to the original wood and even out those last few spots before you are ready to apply your stain.

Tools for the Table

You will also need regular sheets of sandpaper. There will be spots and edges that you will not be able to get to with the sander. If you are working on something that has glass, be careful, and do not use a sander close to your glass. The sandpaper will eat your glass up in a second. It will be ruined. I suggest using sand paper by hand very carefully. Once you've sanded everything and have a nice smooth even finish, you should be ready to apply your stain.

Tools for the Table

You want to purchase a paint thinner or an acetone. Most of us ladies know of acetone as the stuff they use at the nail salon to remove our acrylic nails. Well, acetone does more than nails, and its the best when it comes to cleaning your brushes, spilt paint, and so forth. You can't even purchase it without your ID!

Tools for the Table

You will also need lots of rags, rags for dusting; rags for messy staining; and rags for that messy painting. Every time you go a little too far with that brush, you're going to need that rag to wipe it before it dries. Every time you need to lay your brush down to run to the restroom or grab you something to drink, you will need a rag to lay it on. I suggest old clothing cut into rags, because this stuff is not washable. It's trash.

Tools for the Table

You will need to determine how much stain you will need. I've heard of water based stain, but I personally have never used it. If you are wanting two separate wood tones, then you will need two separate tones of stain. You will need the brushes for your stain and for your paint, large and small. The small brushes are required for the small tedious places, and the large ones are for the large open spaces. I chose to use separate brushes for my stain and my paint. Even though you may have cleaned your brushes thoroughly, it's difficult to get every little bit out of the brush. Using separate brushes will prevent dark stain from being mixed with your paint. You will need to pick you paint too. I chose a water based paint, because that was my best option for the flat look that I desired. It makes the clean up so much easier and it's safe to breathe. Finally, you will need a sealer. A plain wood seal will do nicely. this will protect your paint from scratches, and it will also protect your furniture from those round water spots that are caused from our drinking glasses. Once you have purchased all of the necessary items, you can begin your project.

Rust-Oleum 1966730 Painters Touch Latex, Apple Red

Tools for the Table

You will need to pick you paint too. I chose a water based paint, because that was my best option for the flat look that I desired. It makes the clean up so much easier and it's safe to breathe. Thompsons water seal is what I suggest, and it is the only pricy item on the list, but it will protect your furniture against almost anything.


Tools for the Table

Finally, you will need a sealer. A plain water seal will do nicely. this will protect your paint from scratches, and it will also protect your furniture from those round water spots that are caused from our drinking glasses. Once you have purchased all of the necessary items, you can

Tools for the Table

If you plan on recovering your seats, you will need to have a heavy duty stapler and plenty of staples. Pick a fabric that you are sure about. Once you staple it to your seat, it's not very easily removed.

Step By Step

Here is a video I found on YouTube that offers a little more in depth instructions. This is not my video, and the products used are slightly different, but the basic process is the same. I made the mistake of not making a video during the process of refinishing my table, but I am sure you will find this video very helpful.

Refinishing A Wood Table

The Grand Plan

Sewing and interior decorating are just a few of my many talents, but I just can't seem to figure out that darn sewing machine, go figure! I absolutely love burlap, and it has grown extremely popular just these past couple of years. For those of you who don't know, it's the old brown sacks that our potatoes used to come in, and I was determined to fit this unique style into my kitchen!

Getting Started - Step 1

I found this old table at a storage auction sale that needed some work, but I decided it had some potential, so I bought it. On my way home I stopped at a pawn shop and purchased me an electric sander for maybe ten bucks. As soon as I brought it home and unloaded it, I began. I'm not going to lie to you, this job required some serious dedication. I thought I would never see through the top surface of that table, but as soon as I spotted the original tone of the wood, it gave me that much determination to work even harder. It took me a good solid week of constant sanding, changing my sanding sheets, and burning up one sander before I had finished. That was an exciting moment for me. I was now ready to stain my table

Apply Your Stain - Step 2

I headed down to my local hardware store to pick out my stain. My only intentions were to sand down my table enough to get out all the scratches, and stain my table with two separate coats of polyurethane. That would give me to different wood tones on the top of my table, but if I hadn't made the steps that I made that led me to paint it red, I would have never came out with the finishing results that I have at this current time. I used a very dark MINWAX, dark enough to streak through my paint and another can of a very light natural shade for both end sections of my table. Its very important not to rush your work. It will always require more than one coat just to catch the little spots you missed, and you can't apply your second coat until your first coat is completely dry. Take it from me. I rushed it, it turned out rough and crappy, and I was forced to sand it and stain it all over again.

The Finishing Touch - Step 3

I could have left my table like this, and I did for about two weeks. My husband even tried to convince me that it looked great, but my mind was made up, and I just wasn't happy with. Well, what do you know? I headed down to the hardware store, picked myself out the perfect flat red, water based paint. I painted the whole table and the chairs. After it dried overnight, I applied my second coat. The outcome was absolutely amazing!! I was so glad I had decided to paint my table. The dark stain underneath bled through with a perfectly even streaked look. It couldn't have turned out better if I had planned it that way. I was then ready to apply my sealer.

Step 4

Applying the sealer was a very simple process. I applied it with a paint brush, as just as everything else. I allowed it to dry, and applied my second coat. When the second coat finished, I was DONE!! I couldn't do all this to the wood and not recover the seats to my table, so that was next.

The Last Step - The Chairs

Now I turned my chairs upside down and unscrewed the seats from the frame before I painted them, so this step should be fairly easy. I picked out a nice black and white print fabric that will stand out nicely with the red on my table and chairs. I didn't bother to take the leather off the seats. Besides, what was the point? I felt it only added more cushion and durability, right? I laid my fabric upside down on my kitchen table, laid the seat on top of it, centered, and drew myself a cutting pattern giving at least four inches all the way around. After I cut out six of the patterns, I then took a heavy duty stapler and stapled each pattern to the seat itself. My masterpiece was finally complete, and I was so proud! It would have cost me a fortune to purchase something like this. Besides, I'm too much of a tightwad, and I still have plenty of material to make my curtains. The only thing I need now is my design!

Comments

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    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Samantha Turner 

      2 years ago from Crosby, Texas 77532

      by the way, feel free to fill me in on any mistakes on my hub- totally up suggestions.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      I think the "Learning Center" still says one Amazon or eBay ad per 100 words of text, but if you write a new hub you get a message saying "You have less the required amount of 300 words per Amazon and eBay ad so there is a possibility that your hub mayy not be featured" or something to that effect.

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Samantha Turner 

      2 years ago from Crosby, Texas 77532

      Okie dokie!! Thanks

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      No Google and AdSense just places as many ads as they want or can fit on a hub....the limit only pertains to eBay and Amazon ads, or embedded links to other products.

    • profile imageAUTHOR

      Samantha Turner 

      2 years ago from Crosby, Texas 77532

      Thank you so much for the tip. I had no idea. I thought it was more less required - write hub, get AdSense, google, and Ebay. Does that rule apply with other ads such as Google and so on?

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hi Samantha, welcome to HubPages. This is quite quite a good hub on restoring a kitchen table. You did a good jod. If you want the hub featured however you may have to delete some of the Amazon ads.mup until about six months ago this would have been fine, but recently management is cracking down on the number of Amazon and eBay capsules they allow on hubs. I find that if I have more than two my hubs seem to lose their "featured" status.

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