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Easy DIY Fourth of July Planters

Updated on May 23, 2015

8 SIMPLE IDEAS FOR FOURTH OF JULY CONTAINER GARDENS

Easy Patriotic Calibrachoa Planter

If I'm ever industrious enough or organized enough or have enough spare time, one of these years I'm going to decorate for the Fourth of July with red, white and blue planters.

When that day comes, I'll probably try one of the projects below.

Not only do the results look good, but the projects are simple. And a few of them re-purpose throw-away items, something I'm always trying to do.

Using what you have.

Zonal geraniums in red and white are hardy container plants that are easy to find at most gardening centers.
Zonal geraniums in red and white are hardy container plants that are easy to find at most gardening centers. | Source
Source

Flag Garden Bedding Plants

Lowe's offers a list of easy-to-find flowers to plant outdoors for the Fourth of July.

Birds and Blooms lists more. Most of them are well-suited to container gardens as well as flower beds.

Probably the easiest patriotic planter to make is one with red, white & blue (or purple) flowers in a red, white or blue pot that you already have on hand.

The video above of an "Old Glory" planter that uses petunia-like calibrachoa plants in red, white, and purple would be simple to make.

Hardy and long-blooming, calibrachoa is a good choice for summer planters, as are zonal geraniums, which I chose for one of my mixed container gardens this year.

Long after the holiday is over, red, white and blue flowers in a coordinating pot will look good.

Finding substitutes for blue flowers.

Because there are few blue flowers from which to choose, you may have to use purple flowers in their place. (Lately, I've seen attractive black flowers, too, in particular, glossy black petunias that I think would also be good choices for blue.)

Of course, the blue flowers that you find won't be navy; they'll be bright blue like a forget-me-not or cornflower, robin's egg blue like a morning glory or pale blue/violet like a pansy.

Red, White & Blue Flowers

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Cornflowers would be a good choice of blue flower for a patriotic flower bed.Zonal geraniums in red or white grow well in beds as well as flower pots. (You can pick out zonal varieties by the reddish stripes on their leaves.Love in a mist is another good choice for a patriotic flower bed. Like cornflowers, they're annuals that grow best when directly sown in spring.
Cornflowers would be a good choice of blue flower for a patriotic flower bed.
Cornflowers would be a good choice of blue flower for a patriotic flower bed. | Source
Zonal geraniums in red or white grow well in beds as well as flower pots. (You can pick out zonal varieties by the reddish stripes on their leaves.
Zonal geraniums in red or white grow well in beds as well as flower pots. (You can pick out zonal varieties by the reddish stripes on their leaves. | Source
Love in a mist is another good choice for a patriotic flower bed. Like cornflowers, they're annuals that grow best when directly sown in spring.
Love in a mist is another good choice for a patriotic flower bed. Like cornflowers, they're annuals that grow best when directly sown in spring. | Source
3-PIECE Indoor Red/White/Blue Bell Flower Pots
3-PIECE Indoor Red/White/Blue Bell Flower Pots

Beautiful ceramic pots that will last a lifetime.

 

Novelty Flowerpots

Just add flowers.

Striped and/or starred holiday flowerpots in red, white and blue would also look grand filled with a solid mass of white or red flowers.

To make clean up easy, you could use cachepots rather than flowerpots. Or, treat flowerpots as if they are cachepots and simply set nursery pots inside them.

No blue flowers available? Purple is a good substitute.

Homestead purple verbena is a good hardy blue flower substitute in a full-sun patriotic flower bed or flower pot.
Homestead purple verbena is a good hardy blue flower substitute in a full-sun patriotic flower bed or flower pot. | Source

Fourth of July Stacked Pots

Pots, paint, plants & not much else.

Create a Fourth of July stacked container garden using clay or plastic pots and red, white and blue paint; and flowers in coordinating colors.

If you're feeling ambitious, you could add ribbons and miniature American flags, too. Or, stencil the pots with stars and stripes or some other suitably July 4 image, like firework bursts or the words "God Bless America."

A Patriotic Theme Garden in Oklahoma

Diy Tin Can Planters

DIY planters that form a flag!

Three tin cans, colored electrical tape in red, white and blue, and stick-on stars are all you need (other than plants) for this tin can planter project from Birds & Blooms.

Here's how it's done.

  • Clean out three tin cans (mine are bean cans) and hammer holes into the bottom of them with a nail for drainage.
  • Cover two of the can with alternating stripes of red and white tape.
  • Cover the top half of the remaining can with blue tape, and then finish with off with red and white.
  • Affix sticky stars to the blue, and plant your choice of plants. (I chose red impatiens and a white geranium.)


WASHI TAPE FOURTH OF JULY PLANTER

Wrap on, wrap off—easily.

Wrapping a ceramic, clay or plastic flowerpot with washi tape, a self-adhesive Japanese craft tape sounds even easier than painting it. And, after the holiday, you could simply unwrap the pot or save it to use next year.

Washi tape is available at craft stores and online in all sorts of solid colors, including red, white and blue. Patterned washi tape is also available, from firework bursts to red, white and blue stripes (pictured above right).

Impatiens in white or red are another good choice for a patriotic container garden. And they're easy to find at most garden centers!
Impatiens in white or red are another good choice for a patriotic container garden. And they're easy to find at most garden centers! | Source

FOURTH OF JULY HAT PLANTER

Holiday Flowerpots

Do you decorate for summer holidays with flowers?

See results

A planter made from (mostly) junk.

Following these instructions from Suite101's Gretchen Martin, you can turn recyclables into a patriotic hat planter.

I really like the sound of this project: it's cheap, easy and the results are super attractive.

All you'll need is a plastic nursery pot, a plastic lid from a container, such as a Cool Whip container, very little skill and a few craft items like paint, tape, ribbon and stickers.

SUPER EASY FLAG PLANTERS

A "good thing" from Martha Stewart.

US Flag Store US Wood Stick with Standard Spear Tip Flag, 8 by 12-Inch
US Flag Store US Wood Stick with Standard Spear Tip Flag, 8 by 12-Inch

Flags like these, that have a spear tip, will go easily into the soil of your container.

 

Inserting a pattern of small American flags of different sizes is an easy way to turn your flowerpots into temporary Fourth of July planters.

Martha Stewart inserts an astonishing number of flags, which she sells on her website, into a large pot of double white petunias in this video tutorial and admonishes us to never let the flags touch the ground (or potting soil, in this case).

WOODEN FOLK ART PLANTER

A fun use for old cabinet drawers.

This Fourth of July planter project from Woman's Day magazine would be easy to make if you have an old wooden drawer on hand. (A drawer from an defunct library card catalog cabinet would be perfect.)

Otherwise, you'd have to make the wooden box rather than simply paint it to resemble a flag, and that seems way too complicated to me. Besides, I really like the idea of re-purposing things, so ... if I ever run across an old drawer, I'm definitely saving it for this project.

Although it's called a planter, the box could be used for other things, too. For instance, it could be used as a candle holder or a silverware caddy.

Source

About the Author

The Dirt Farmer has been an active gardener for over 30 years.

She first began gardening as a child alongside her grandfather on her parents' farm.

Today, The Dirt Farmer gardens at home, volunteers at community gardens and continues to learn about gardening through the MD Master Gardener program.

Copyright © 2013 by Jill Spencer. All rights reserved.

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    • The Dirt Farmer profile imageAUTHOR

      Jill Spencer 

      3 years ago from United States

      Hi Patricia! Our neighbors raise and lower the flag daily. What a nice tradition. Glad to hear from you. Hope you & yours are keeping well. -Jill

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      3 years ago from sunny Florida

      Love these, Jill. I have never made a pot of red white and blue flowers but you have inspired me to do so and I still have time. We raised by a Daddy who served in a number of wars and who loved his country so much...we raised and lowered a gigantic flag every single day!!

      Thanks for sharing...hoping all is well with you and yours.

      Angels are winging their way to you this morning ps Voted up++++

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 

      5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      This is so festive sounding! Lots of great ideas to gear up for tomorrow.

    • The Dirt Farmer profile imageAUTHOR

      Jill Spencer 

      5 years ago from United States

      @ Maren--

      Absolutely! Any chance to celebrate. Nice to hear from you! --Jill

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile image

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      5 years ago from Pennsylvania

      This works for French Bastille Day, also.

    • The Dirt Farmer profile imageAUTHOR

      Jill Spencer 

      5 years ago from United States

      Love your flower combination, Pearl. I've never seen red verbena, but grow blue and white salvia and, of course, petunias are always easy to find. Will have to be on the look out for the red. Thanks for stopping by and, of course, for the votes! --Jill

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 

      5 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Hi Jill! This is awesome, and very useful for gardeners who wish to add a holiday touch to their landscape. I combine blue salvia, red verbena and white petunias in my 4th of July container garden. The salvia always winters over, but the verbena and petunias are annuals here.

      If I have the time, I'd like to try that tin can planter idea from Birds and Blooms. Great stuff ;) Pearl

      Voted Up+++ and pinned

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