ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Front Yard: Mix Vegetables and Flowers Beautifully in the Gardens

Updated on April 2, 2018
Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren gardens in Pennsylvania, specializing in earth-friendly, unconventional, creative, joyful artistry at low cost.

Complementary Flowers and Veggies

In the background are broccoli and a cherry tomato plant.  The foreground has hosta and daisies.
In the background are broccoli and a cherry tomato plant. The foreground has hosta and daisies. | Source

Mix Flowers and Food Plants Together

Flowers and vegetables mixed together – it works for me. But, what should I call my garden plot? Fleggies? Vegewers? Flowertables?

Why Put Vegetables in the Front

I live at a wonderful place with a very shaded back yard. Although the side yards receive some sun, they are quite narrow. Guess what? The consistently sunny spacious area for planting is in the front. Since I want to help my family and the environment by growing some of my own food, I do that where the sun is. Since I also like to have flowers, I put the shade loving plants in the back and the sun loving ones in the front, mixed with the veggies.

Partial Shade Mixed Garden

I have mixed vegetables in with flowers in the past, but it was on a very small scale. Now I have a huge palette (the entire yard) and almost complete artistic freedom. Even better, the lawn mower of the family likes it when I take away lawn by expanding my gardens. You don’t need to tell me these things twice: I am ON it!

Thus, in a plot which receives partial shade in the morning, I created a green and white "rug" which is soothing all the time. Using a key in which red arrows point to produce and yellow arrows point to flowers, in the photo below one can see:

  • Red Arrows: broccoli, cherry tomato
  • Yellow Arrows: hosta, sedum, lamb's ear, daisies

Driveway Plot of Whites and Greens

This is a green and white themed garden focusing on the plants' foliage rather than blossoms.
This is a green and white themed garden focusing on the plants' foliage rather than blossoms. | Source

Afternoon Sun Side Yard Garden

I had a bed established along an added sun porch. Sadly neglected, it featured daylilies at the foundation, lamium, and many weeds. This area receives heavy sun from noon until sunset. This year I have a healthy mix of flowers and food. Admittedly, the quantities of plants are not huge - not enough to start selling at a farmer's market, but enough to furnish fresh, un-sprayed vegetables.

  • Red Arrows: potatoes, onions, spinach, sugar snap peas
  • Yellow Arrows: lamium, daylilies, peony, daffodil, rhododendron

Source

Sunny All Day Front Veggie-Flower Garden

Bordering all the front property boundary is a garden upon which the sun beats constantly. I expand this garden up the hill every year to take away more grass and create more growing room for me. Please understand that it is a project in progress. The photos below show plots next to hybrid lilies, butterfly bush, holly, chrysanthemum, daffodils, and lilies. There is already a plot of potatoes in the background of the first photo.

Ready for Veggies

The patch of nicely worked soil is waiting for bush green beans.
The patch of nicely worked soil is waiting for bush green beans.
This full sun area will receive either beans or a tomato plant.
This full sun area will receive either beans or a tomato plant.

Insert Vegetables in Every Possible Location

Below are two places where I have "snuck" veggies in between existing plants.

  • Red Arrow First Photo: three onions between hybrid lilies and an azalea bush.
  • Red Arrow Second Photo: potatoes between yew and rhododendron.

Chimney potatoes and sneaky onions

A few more onion plants.
A few more onion plants.
Trim back your shrubs and plant a few potatoes!
Trim back your shrubs and plant a few potatoes!

No More Rules

I declare no more rules for the home gardener. Plant what you want! Eat healthily! Play outside!

© 2011 Maren Elizabeth Morgan

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile image
      Author

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 6 years ago from Pennsylvania

      NotTooTall - thanks for the affirmation. Now we all need to watch Oak Park, Michigan to see if local municipalities can get away with governing our garden plots and yards. (I think we gardeners will win.)

    • NotTooTall profile image

      NotTooTall 6 years ago from The Land of Pleasant Living

      HiMaren Morgan M-T,

      Nice Hub! I can't agree more . . . I like to sneak raddish seeds beneath established plants and get more production from a pre-planted area all the time. They grow easy and fast.

      Gardeners can make their own rules, so flowers, veggies and herbs can share their space . . . and get along just fine. I enjoyed the information ~ thanks.

      N T T

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile image
      Author

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 6 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks, LeroyShane. I was thinking the same thing - that we are due for a photo update. I have grand-looking broccoli next to sedum. When it stops raining, I might get myself out there to snap some pix. Are you also putting flowers and veggies in the same plot?

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile image
      Author

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 6 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks so much. I will report on the harvest later in the summer.

    • Miss Mellie profile image

      M.S. Ross 6 years ago

      Maren, I love your attitude toward gardening. Indeed, who says you can't mix flowers and veggies? Using free spots between existing plants is a clever way to make the best use of what space you have. Voted useful and up. Wishing you a flourishing garden!

    working