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Grow Your Own Herbs In Pots And Containers - Coriander

Updated on March 13, 2013
Coriander
Coriander

Simple Tips To Grow Coriander As A Potted Herb

One of the most popular herbs for Asian cooking, coriander is actually a tender perenial, but in cold climates it is grown as an annual. It has been cultivated for use in cooking for over 3000 years, and is also said to have antibacterial and digestion aiding properties.

Herbs are one of the best suited types of edible plants to grow in pots and containers. Usually a little at a time is all that is required for adding to meals, so one or two plants are usually sufficient. As herbs are often regularly used in the kitchen, growing them in pots means they can be located within easy reach, just outside the door, or on the patio or decking. Herbs can still be grown by individuals who live in a home with no outdoor space. Many herbs will happily grow in pots on windowsills or on balconies. The other advantage of having them close to hand is that they can be picked when required. Can’t get much fresher than that.


Coriander seedlings
Coriander seedlings

Growing tips

Deep pots and loose soil.

Coriander is of the same family as carrots and has similar long roots so to ensure a healthy plant it should have an adequately deep pot to grow in, ideally 30cm deep. Like carrots, it enjoys light, free draining soil, so make sure the compost isn’t too dense, adding some grit if required and make sure the bottom of the pot or container has adequate drainage holes.

Sowing and positioning.

The seeds are best sown in mid to late spring once the risk of frost has past. Position the pot in a sunny area as coriander dislikes damp, wet conditions. It can grow to over 60cm in the ground but in pots usually achieves a height of about 30cm. Coriander can bolt if left to dry out or exposed to too much heat, so be prepared to move the pot to a slightly less exposed position to prevent this from happening.

Harvesting and pests.

The plants can become tough after a while so it can be a good idea to sow further seeds every month or two to have a continuous supply of fresh and tender stems and leaves. In late summer the plant will produce seeds which can either be used in cooking, in addition to the leaves and stems, or be used for propagation the following year. The little white flowers of the plant make it an attractive herb to have around the house. Coriander is not at risk of any pests or diseases and can actually deter unwanted insects away from the house.

If you want to grow your own herb, coriander is a great choice. It is easy to grow, requires little care, and will add great flavour, texture and colour to your meals.

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    • jasmith1 profile image
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      Adrian Smith 5 years ago from UK

      I'm glad. Thanks for letting me know. :)

    • jasmith1 profile image
      Author

      Adrian Smith 5 years ago from UK

      Thanks - I am glad. :)

    • krsharp05 profile image

      krsharp05 5 years ago from 18th and Vine

      Very helpful hub!

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