ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Growing Potatoes In Bags

Updated on March 5, 2012

I did an article on growing tomatoes in ice cream buckets and today we are going to learn how to grow potatoes in bags.

You can buy ready made pots if you don’t want to go to the trouble of stitching up your own but I already had landscape fabric left over from other projects and I’m a do it yourself kind of gal.

I’ve included pictures to help you see what I’m doing.

It’s not difficult to make one and you don’t have to be good at sewing. Your stitches don’t have to be perfect; your potatoes won’t care.

First I cut a circle out of landscape fabric 26 inches across. I took a measuring tape to use as a sort of compass but you can use a piece of string or whatever you might have on hand to help get a uniform circle. I used a piece of chalk to mark my cutting lines.

The brand I bought was three foot wide, which will give you a bag a little less than a yardstick tall after seam allowance. I cut another piece 84 inches long. My circle is 82 inches around and I added a couple for sewing. I made about a one-inch seam give or take; no need to measure, just eyeball it.

As you can see in the picture you sew up the three-foot sides making a cylinder. Then you attach the circle to one end of your tube to make a can shape.

Turn the seam side in so you now have a nice bag with the seams on the inside. Roll down the sides to about eight inches; add six inches of soil or potting mix and then your seed potatoes.

You can find seed potatoes at any feed store or garden center that sells seeds and plants. Cut the eyes or buds in sections from the potato. Each eye will be a plant.

Cover with dirt so that just a little bit of the sprout is peaking out.

After your plants start growing you will need to add soil to them after they get a few inches above the ground. Potatoes should always be kept mostly under dirt with just a little head sticking out. Keep unrolling and adding dirt as they grow until they are mature then you can dump the contents on to a tarp and unearth your vegetables. Be careful if you use a shovel or sharp tool or you might damage your potatoes.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      6 years ago from Oklahoma

      Thanks, frogyfish, it makes it easier to keep the dirt mounded around them.

    • frogyfish profile image

      frogyfish 

      6 years ago from Central United States of America

      Absolutely coo-ol idea! Unique and easy and productive too!

    • profile image

      Hubert Williams 

      6 years ago

      I might do that.

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      6 years ago from Oklahoma

      That is still a technique I haven't heard of. Perhaps you should write an article about it.

    • profile image

      Hubert Williams 

      6 years ago

      Actually it was straw instead of hay. I forgetthat they are different.

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      6 years ago from Oklahoma

      Hubert, I haven't tried hay. There are so many ways to grow vegetables.

    • profile image

      Hubert Williams 

      6 years ago

      Interesting. I've grown them in hay and the ground, might as well try a bag. Thank you

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      6 years ago from Oklahoma

      Jenn, I have a lot of trees and have a hard time finding a sunny spot. If you can find one this is a great way to grow potatoes.

    • Duffee profile image

      Duffee 

      6 years ago

      This is something I would love to try!! (If only I got more sunlight in my yard!!) What an excellent hub!! Thanks for sharing!! Cheers, Jenn

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      I haven't grown potatoes in them but I grow impatience in a truck tire. They work great for growing many things.

    • Teddletonmr profile image

      Mike Teddleton 

      7 years ago from Midwest USA

      Great idea, have you ever tried the method where you repurpose old car tires to grow patatoes?

      This method is something I will absolutely try.

      Thanks for the inspiration. Mike

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Peggy, the great thing about it is you don't have to have very much room and you can move them if you need to.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      I remember when my grandfather grew potatoes, but that was in the ground. For people without enough land...this would appear as a good option. Thanks!

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Thanks, Fay.

    • profile image

      Fay Paxton 

      7 years ago

      I've gotta stick with you, Pamela. I'll never go hungry.:)

      You have the most unique ways to garden. Thanks

      up/useful

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Thanks for reading, prasetio30. I hope your father likes this idea. You can grow other plants this way too.

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 

      7 years ago from malang-indonesia

      I love potato and I'll show this hub to my father. I hope he'll get a lot of inspiration after reading this hub. Well done, Pam. I always learn something new from you. Rated up!

      Prasetio

    • profile image

      Suramya.K 

      7 years ago

      Thanks Pamela, waiting for more gardening tips!!

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      I bet you are, Will.

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 

      7 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      I'm actually very handy, Pamela. I was just kidding!

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      WillStarr, it is an easy project that anyone can do.

      Suramya, it will be different all over the world. We all have different growing seasons. Good luck with your gardening.

    • profile image

      Suramya.K 

      7 years ago

      I guess winter is the best season to grow potatoes. Here in my country, it is summer now and all the potatoes available here are stored underground as they were grown back in winter. Should definitely give it a try!!

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 

      7 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      Wow!

      With great instructions and pictures like that, even I could do it!

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Thanks for reading, KoffeeKlatch Gals. I hope you have a great crop.

    • KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

      Susan Hazelton 

      7 years ago from Sunny Florida

      What a great idea. I agree with Pamela99 - it's not easy growing anything in this sandy soil of FL. I have to give this a try. Rated up and useful.

    • Pamela N Red profile imageAUTHOR

      Pamela N Red 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Suramya, it is different depending on where you live so you would need to find out the optimum time to grow potatoes in your area. I have readers all over the world and as you know growing seasons vary.

      anujagarwal, it takes about ten to twelve weeks to grow potatoes. You need to keep them watered well as above ground gardening drains well.

      Pamela, this would help with that. You can use potting mix to get a good soil.

      mckbirdbks, those smart pots or gro pots come in different sizes. Some are pretty big but they can be expensive if you make your own you can make them as large as you want.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 

      7 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Just a note. I've read you cannot use the same soil season to season with potatoes. I've seen commercial potatoe bags, but they were a lot smaller than you produced. I might be mistaken, but I think your potatoes are ready to harvest when the top foliage dies out.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      7 years ago from Sunny Florida

      I think this is a very clever idea and something I might try. It isn't easy to grow produce in norther FL due to such sandy soil so your idea would make all the difference. Thanks.

    • anujagarwal profile image

      Anuj Agarwal 

      7 years ago from Noida

      Great Information Pamela! Can you also tell, how much time it usually takes to grow the potatoes.

    • profile image

      Suramya.K 

      7 years ago

      Is this evergreen or will only work in some seasons? But it seems to be worth a try, as my curiosity level is pumping. Time to grow some potatoes, I love French fries!!

      Great DIY Pamela!!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)