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Protecting Your Grapes

Updated on July 21, 2013
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Grapes on a vineGrapes on a vine
Grapes on a vine
Grapes on a vine
Grapes on a vine
Grapes on a vine

Grape Protection

Have you ever picked grapes from a grapevine? Have you ever managed to successfully grow your own without them becoming spoiled or ruined by birds? Sometimes it’s hard to, especially when there are insects and birds that love eating them as much as we do.

As well as eating grapes raw as a fruit, grapes are also commonly used to make wine, jam, jelly, juice, raisins and vinegar.

In order to combat this, we have to protect our grapes, like we would everything else form our trees, plants and garden.


How to Protect your Grapes

There are several different ways to protect our grapes to ensure that birds and other pests don’t get to them before we do. As you can see in the photos, the easiest and most cost effective way it to use pages from a magazine to wrap around and shield the bunches.

After wrapping them around the top of the stem, you can use a stapler to staple the page together. A page from a magazine is much more effective because it is more durable and lasts longer outdoors than a newspaper would. This will ensure that the grapes will remain untouched and birds cannot attack them from above.

Using this method will ensure that the grapes will ripen undisturbed from its predators.


Growing your Grapes and Uses for Grapes

Growing your own grapes is a great advantage to have as long as the climate is suitable. They are a delicious and suitable fruit to eat during the summer with ice-cream or in a fruit salad.

If you produce more than you and your family can manage to eat, you may be creative and make some homemade jam, wine or jelly.

Have You Ever Grown Your Own Grapes?

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