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Tips on Growing Potatoes at Home in Grow Bags or Pots.

Updated on February 4, 2018
sangre profile image

Loves experimenting with being self sufficient and looking at new wasys to use things.

Growing Potatoes at Home

Source

Using a Potato Grow Bag

Don't allow yourself to be depressed that you can't grow your own vegetables at home. If you have a bit of space and some type of container you will be able to grow your own vegetables at home.

Growing vegetables at home isn't as time consuming as you might expect. You just need to make sure you give them vegetable feed every few weeks as well as watering them every week.

Grow bags are very easy to use, are reusable, and take up very little space. After you have harvested your vegetables from them, you can wash them and store them away till next year.

So to get started this year, all you will need is buy your grow bag, vegetables, compost, fertilizer and organic vegetable feed.

You can purchase potatoes grow bags in any garden centre.

Variety of Potatoes

Ireland
United Kindom
USA
Queens
Jersey Royals
Russet
Maris Pipers
Maris Pipers
Yukon Gold
Keer Pinks
White Potatoes
Red Potato
Roosters
Charlotte
Norland
White Potatoes
King Edwards
 
Golden Wonders
Duchy
 
Records
 
 

Potato Harvest

You can buy seed potatoes in any good hardware store or market. There are different types of varieties out there so choose one that meets your needs.
You can buy seed potatoes in any good hardware store or market. There are different types of varieties out there so choose one that meets your needs. | Source

Getting Started

There is many varieties of potatoes on the market, so picking one can be difficult. Here is a lists of things to consider when you buy some.

  • Choose one that is suitable for your climate.
  • Pick a variety that has a good reputation.
  • Research the type of potato you are going to grow to see if there any issues around it.
  • Buy seed potatoes from a good distributor.
  • Research the variety you are considering to see if they have a good yield.

Items Required
4- 5 Containers or grow bags
Vegetable compost
Gardening gloves
Watering can
Fertilizer
2 - 3 Bags of seed potatoes
List of items required to grow your own potatoes at home

Have your ever tried growing your own vegetables?

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Other Potato Containers

Once you have got your equipment ready, the next step is to decide what you're going to plant your potatoes in.

If you don't have any potato grow bags, you can also rely on other types of containers. You can use:

  • Old buckets
  • Pots
  • Flower pots
  • Wheels
  • Drums

Consider what space it is you have available to store these different containers. That's why grow bags are great, they take up very little space.

Potato Planting Procedure

This is the reusable planter bag or grow bag that you can buy for growing potatoes in.  You can store it anwhere.
This is the reusable planter bag or grow bag that you can buy for growing potatoes in. You can store it anwhere. | Source
This is what the inside of the potato bag looks like.
This is what the inside of the potato bag looks like. | Source
If you don't have a potato bag then you might try using an old bucket that you have. Just put some holes in the bottom of it.
If you don't have a potato bag then you might try using an old bucket that you have. Just put some holes in the bottom of it. | Source
If you have any big pots that you used for plants or  shrubs then you might like to try planting your potatoes in this type of container.
If you have any big pots that you used for plants or shrubs then you might like to try planting your potatoes in this type of container. | Source

Week 1: Planting Your Potatoes

Fill the potato bag up about 1/3 of the way with compost.
Fill the potato bag up about 1/3 of the way with compost. | Source
Once you have placed 2 to 3 of your seed potatoes into the potato bag, cover them with a layer of compost and give the good watering.
Once you have placed 2 to 3 of your seed potatoes into the potato bag, cover them with a layer of compost and give the good watering. | Source
Once you have placed your potatoes in the potato bag, cover them with a layer of compost and give the good watering.
Once you have placed your potatoes in the potato bag, cover them with a layer of compost and give the good watering. | Source
Once the clay is layered over the sprouts on the potatoes, it will look like this. Keep layering compost over the potato stalks each time they appear.
Once the clay is layered over the sprouts on the potatoes, it will look like this. Keep layering compost over the potato stalks each time they appear. | Source
Once you see the sprouts appearing on your  potatoes, it's important that you cover the potatoes each time. You will be surprised how quick it starts to grow.
Once you see the sprouts appearing on your potatoes, it's important that you cover the potatoes each time. You will be surprised how quick it starts to grow. | Source

Week 1 : Planting Your Seed Potatoes

Once you have chosen what variety of potatoes you are going to grow, you need to prepare your grow bags. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Fill up about 1/3 of your grow bag with vegetable compost.
  2. Plant 2-3 seed potatoes into each potato grow bag.
  3. Insert some fertilizer pellets into the bag.
  4. Cover your potatoes over with another layer of the compost.
  5. Lastly give your potatoes a good watering .

Week 2: Progress of Potatoes

By week two you will see tiny potatoes sprout shooting up. They will only be a few millimeters in height. As the weeks progress and if you have continuously hot weather, you will see tiny potato stalk shooting up more and more.

Monthly Progress of Potato Crop

It takes about a week and a half before you will see the potatoes start to sprout up in the bag.
It takes about a week and a half before you will see the potatoes start to sprout up in the bag. | Source
At the beginning of the third week if the weather is seasonally hot, you will see the sprouts starting to emerge more.
At the beginning of the third week if the weather is seasonally hot, you will see the sprouts starting to emerge more. | Source
By the end of the fourth week the sprouts will have really grown. You will see that every day the grow more and more.
By the end of the fourth week the sprouts will have really grown. You will see that every day the grow more and more. | Source
Remember that each time the potato stalks start to grow, you need to add more compost into the potato bag. You keep this up until the bag is filled to the very top with compost.
Remember that each time the potato stalks start to grow, you need to add more compost into the potato bag. You keep this up until the bag is filled to the very top with compost. | Source
By the end of the sixth week the potato stalks will be rising well about the potato grow bag. There are still a few more weeks left before the potatose will be ready to harvest.
By the end of the sixth week the potato stalks will be rising well about the potato grow bag. There are still a few more weeks left before the potatose will be ready to harvest. | Source
At the 3 to 4 month mark your potato harvest should be fully grown.
At the 3 to 4 month mark your potato harvest should be fully grown. | Source
You will see purple flowers emerging from the stalks of the potato stalks.
You will see purple flowers emerging from the stalks of the potato stalks. | Source

Week 3: Progress of Potato Crop

By week three you should see lots of potato stalks emerging from your grow bag.
By week three you should see lots of potato stalks emerging from your grow bag. | Source

Week 3 - 5: Update Report

By week three, your potato grow bags should be fully covered with new tiny potato stalks. Each week, as the potato stalks continue to grow, you need to continue to fill up the grow bag with compost.

Eventually the compost will run level with the grow bag. Now you just need to watch your crop for potato blight, fertilize them every few weeks, and water them.

Week 6: Potato Harvest Progress

By week 6 you should really see the potato stalks beginning to grow in size.
By week 6 you should really see the potato stalks beginning to grow in size. | Source

Week 8: Potato Crop Progress Report

As the weeks progress, you will see the potato stalks increasing in size in your grow bag.

It's important that you continue to water your crop so that they can produce more potatoes.

By month four, if all is progressing as expected, you will see that the potato crop stalks haven risen up about 3 foot from the top of the grow bag.

You will also see small purple flowers growing on the potato stalks.

Use plant labels to write the date that you  planted the potatoes in the grow bag.  This is handy to help you identify when potatoes were planted if you have planted different potatoes on different dates.
Use plant labels to write the date that you planted the potatoes in the grow bag. This is handy to help you identify when potatoes were planted if you have planted different potatoes on different dates. | Source

If you are planting different crops of potatoes, at different times, then using plant labels allows you to write the date that the vegetables were planted on each label.

Growing Potatoes in bag

Each week you will see an increase in the size of the potato stalks in the potato grow bags.
Each week you will see an increase in the size of the potato stalks in the potato grow bags. | Source

When to Harvest Your Potatoes

It will take about 3 to 4 months before your potato crop will be ready to harvest.

If the weather was good during the period after you planted your crop, then after about three months, you might find that your potatoes are ready to be harvested.

However, if after three months you are impatient to check the progress of your harvest, empty out one grow bag.

If the potatoes are not yet fully grown, you might prefer to leave them for another few weeks to get bigger.

How to Harvest Potatoes from a Grow Bag

Once it is time to harvest your potatoes from the grow bags, you need to empty out the whole contents of the grow bag. The way to harvest your crop is to do the following things.

  • Place a bin liner bag on the ground to avoid a mess.
  • Shake up the compost around the roots.
  • Use your hands to separate the potatoes from the compost and the roots.
  • Make sure you are really through and find all the potatoes among the clay.
  • Some rotting seed potatoes will be among the potatoes.

Harvesting Your Potato Crop

Once you remove the compost from the grow bag you will need to start rooting throught the it to find the potatoes.
Once you remove the compost from the grow bag you will need to start rooting throught the it to find the potatoes. | Source
You will have to empty the clay out of the grow bag onto a bin liner to remove the potatoes from the clay. You will see lots of roots running throught the compost.
You will have to empty the clay out of the grow bag onto a bin liner to remove the potatoes from the clay. You will see lots of roots running throught the compost. | Source
Put the potatoes you have removed from the grow bag into a bucket. You should get a good few potatoes from each grow bag.
Put the potatoes you have removed from the grow bag into a bucket. You should get a good few potatoes from each grow bag. | Source

The clay in the grow bag will be held very tightly together by the roots in the grow bag.

Potato Blight is Your Enemy

  • Potato blight is a disease that infects potato crops.
  • It is spread thought the air.
  • You need to be vigilant and keep an eye on your potato crop to ensure that it does not get infected with potato blight.
  • Regularly check your local newspaper and weather station to see if there are any reports of potato blight.
  • Always remain on alert for any black spots, but don't spend the whole 3 months worrying about it.
  • If you see black spots on your potato crop leaves or you notice rotten tubers, remove these along with the infected stalks. This might help prevent the blight from spreading.
  • You can take preventive measures and spray your potatoes with a copper fungicide to prevent potato blight.

Getting the preparations done in the beginning is really the hardest part of growing potatoes along with being vigilant for potato blight.

Once you have had a successful potato harvest, you will find that you want to grow more vegetables the next year.


© 2014 Sp Greaney

Comments

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    • sangre profile imageAUTHOR

      Sp Greaney 

      4 years ago from Ireland

      Hi Nancy Owens. Thanks, it definitely suits the people who have no garden or a small one like me.

    • Nancy Owens profile image

      Nancy Owens 

      4 years ago from USA

      What a great idea for people who do not have garden spots. Very well written.

    • sangre profile imageAUTHOR

      Sp Greaney 

      4 years ago from Ireland

      Hi RTalloni, it sure is. :)

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      4 years ago from the short journey

      Folding for storage is a huge bonus. Thanks again for the info.

    • sangre profile imageAUTHOR

      Sp Greaney 

      4 years ago from Ireland

      Hi ChitrangadaSharan, Thanks. I'm so happy that the crop was successful, especially after I put so much hard work into them.

      I don't have a big garden so had to look at the different methods out there that would suit my space. :)

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 

      4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Excellent hub with useful and illustrative pictures on growing potatoes!

      I have never tried growing potatoes this way. Thanks for sharing this very unique idea.

      Voted up and pinned!

    • sangre profile imageAUTHOR

      Sp Greaney 

      4 years ago from Ireland

      Hi RTalloni. Thanks for your comment. Some people can be unlucky and not have much success with growing a crop and it's a pity because when you eat your own potatoes, at least you know what is in them. :)

      Yes they are, and they are made from extremely light material to and it's easy to fold them up after the season and they won't take up a lot of space.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      4 years ago from the short journey

      Thanks for this look at growing potatoes in containers. We've not had success in the past but that could be for any number of reasons. Would like to try it again and this is good motivation to do so. These grow bags must be woven so they will drain water?

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