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Nasturtiums, one of my Granny Madge's favorite plants!

Updated on October 15, 2012

Colorful Nasturtium Flower

A beautiful example!
A beautiful example! | Source

Multicolored Nasturtium.

Another beautiful example of the Nasturtium flower.
Another beautiful example of the Nasturtium flower. | Source

A bright yellow Nasturtium

Another example of a bright Nasturtium
Another example of a bright Nasturtium | Source

My Granny Madge and her special plants.

This attractive plant with colorful flowers was a must in my Granny’s various gardens. Wherever we moved to, after inspecting the garden, Granny Madge would say something about the nasturtiums and proceed to work on them when they were already there, or to plant some when the garden was without. They were not the most beautiful flowers to be seen in our gardens, but apparently they were some of the most useful ones. They certainly provided a lot of color!

It was no surprise for the rest of my family members to discover that as usual, Granny Madge was right about the need for the Nasturtium plants in our garden! At the end of this article, I will describe how we used this plant immediately after the 1960 earthquakes that hit my hometown, Concepcion. They were not as vital to our well being as our Camellia tree turned out to be, but they were certainly important and useful.

Description of the Nasturtium.

The plants grow easily and abundantly from seeds, which can be bought in packets from any provider, or if the plants are already established, they will seed themselves. If placed in containers, they will tumble over the edges in a spontaneous cascade.

There are three main types of nasturtiums:

· Dwarf, which are bushy and compact, and include the glorious “Empress of India” with a deep red flower.

· Semi-trailing, reaching a length of about two to three feet.

· Climbing, which send out runners that can be six to eight foot long, and which like to climb trellises.

All types of Nasturtiums like relatively poor soils, but need humidity and sun. They are not frost resistant, but will pop up again in the following season. The poorer the soil, the more flowers the plants will produce.

The plants that we normally use in our gardens descend mainly from the original species that grew in the Peruvian Andes. The Incas had several practical uses for the Nasturtium plant, both as a medicinal herb and as an edible plant. The seeds were taken to Europe by the Spanish conquistadores, at the end of the 15th century and at the beginning of the 16th century, and its use quickly spread throughout Europe.

Over the years, several cultivars have been produced, that have introduced varieties whose plants do not sprawl so much, being more compact in shape. The variety of colors has also increased, turning the Nasturtium into an ornamental landscaping plant.

However, as a plant of more ornamental value, the Nasturtium has not lost its other characteristics that make it such an interesting plant.

Nasturtiums as ground cover

Nasturtium plants can be used as live mulch!
Nasturtium plants can be used as live mulch! | Source

A Nasturtium Salad

A colorful plate showing a Nasturtium salad
A colorful plate showing a Nasturtium salad | Source

A Mixed salad bowl

A lovely, tasy salad!
A lovely, tasy salad! | Source

Some practical uses of the Nasturtiums

· In gardens, they can be used as a ground cover, giving the garden an old fashioned cottage look. They can also be a “filler” plant in tricky areas, like steep banks. We liked to put the plants at the inner edge of stone or brick parapets, so that they would cascade over and cover these structures.

- They are much used as a living mulch, which will help to avoid weeds, drying out and erosion.

- They make good “companion” plants for tomatoes, radishes, cabbages and cucumbers, as they deter aphids and pest of the cucurbits. For this same reason, they can be planted under fruit trees.

· The leaves and flowers are edible, with a sharp, tangy, peppery taste that combines very well with bland tasting salads such as some types of lettuce.

· Flowers are great accents in salads due to the bright colors. and they can also be used to infuse vinegar, or vodka.

· The Andean peoples use the Nasturtium as a disinfectant and also as a wound healing herb. Therefore, the medicinal properties of this plant have been known for many centuries.

· The leaves are antibacterial, aiding immunity against bacterial infections. They can ease colds, bronchitis and sore throats, due to the fact that they act as a natural antibiotic. They are also very rich in vitamin C., and make a good expectorant for phlegm.

· Externally, the leaves can be used as a treatment for baldness, minor injuries and skin eruptions. They are also very useful for easing dry, flaky skin.

· The green seed pods make a good substitute for capers.

· The seed, used in this fashion, receive several different names: Nasturtium capers – false capers – poor man’s capers – California capers.

Real capers are expensive

The real capers can be bought in specialized stores, but they are very expensive. This is the reason for the search for a cheaper substitute, which fortunately can be provided by the Nasturtium seed pods, an alternative we can all enjoy!

One of Granny Madge's recipes for false capers.

My Granny's favorite recipe is as follows:

2 tablespoons salt – 1 cup water – ½ cup nasturtium seedpods, picked when still green and tender, - ¾ cup white wine vinegar – 2 teaspoons sugar -1 dried bay leaf – 2 sprigs fresh thyme.

Heat the water and salt in a saucepan, until the water starts to boil. Put the seedpods in a glass jar and pour the boiling brine over them. Cover and let them soak for three days, at room temperature.

Drain the pods. Bring the rest of the ingredients to a boil. Pour over the seedpods and let cool. Cover the jar and refrigerate for three days before using. If covered in vinegar, they can keep in the refrigerator for about six months.

The pods need to be picked over so as to remove any segments of the flowers.

The brine should be changed, and the pods washed out while soaking in the brine, to remove the strong sulphur smell that they will send out.

These false capers are usually used in salads, and in vegetable and fish dishes. They are delicious!

Nasturtium leaves

A nice flat leaf!
A nice flat leaf! | Source

Collecting drops of water with a Nasturtium leaf

A beautiful example of moisture on a Nasturtium leaf!
A beautiful example of moisture on a Nasturtium leaf! | Source

The events of 1960: The earthquakes hit us badly!

As if all the above was not enough to raise our interest in growing Nasturtiums, these plants can help out in the most extraordinary circumstances!

I have already written about some of our adventures and difficulties during the catastrophic earthquakes of May 1960. At that time, we had a big and varied garden, a product of Granny Madge’s best efforts. Of course, there was a whole array of Nasturtiums growing on the flower beds and hanging over the stone parapets. As already stated in the previous article, we were without water, electricity and gas, for several days.

The first service to come back was the light, but the water and the gas took a little longer, due to the fact that the underground pipes for these services were in a chaotic state due to the fault in the ground outside our house. In fact, the potable water was running into the gas pipes!

We were using sea water for the sanitary installations, and for as much else as we could, as my father was loading big drums of salty water onto one of our trucks and bringing them from the beach to our house, where we laboriously dumped the water by the bucketful, over the windowsill into the bathtub that conveniently was installed right under the window!

We washed ourselves as sparingly as possible, and our hands and faces were getting all dry and itchy with the lack of good water. But Granny Madge solved that problem by showing us how to pick flat Nasturtium leaves in the early morning, when they were still wet and fresh, and use them to rub over our faces and hands. Oh, but it felt wonderfully fresh and cleansing! As far as I was concerned, that saved the day!

We also chewed the Nasturtium leaves, to help prevent infection due to all the dust and dirt that was flying around due to the constant after-shakes, and that felt really good too. We knew we were consuming vitamin C by the dose-full, and nobody came down with a cold or a cough, so my Granny’s faith in her planting was confirmed on all sides!

Nature can provide such wonderful products!

© 2012 joanveronica (Joan Robertson)

Nature can provide such wonderful products!

Beautiful, useful Nasturtiums!
Beautiful, useful Nasturtiums! | Source

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    • Living Well Now profile image

      Living Well Now 4 years ago from Near Indianapolis

      Another great hub, JV! I love your stories...

      I've always planted nasturtiums in my garden. They reminded me of little solar collectors soaking up the sun when I was a kid. I know some folks think they're invasive - and they can be - but trimming them with scissors keeps 'em in line. I love the peppery taste and colorful blossoms in a salad.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, thank you for the visit and the comment! I agree, I have always loved Nasturtiums they are such happy looking plants!

    • debbiepinkston profile image

      Debbie Pinkston 4 years ago from Pereira, Colombia and NW Arkansas

      Joan, thank you for such an informative hub! I didn't know much about nasturtiums but now I'm inspired to find some seeds and give them a try. Here in NW Arkansas there isn't much variety at the local stores so I may have to order the seeds from an online source. Are naturtiums annuals or perenials? I try to stick to perenials since they are a better investment!

      Thanks again and keep up informed of other garden wonders!

    • bac2basics profile image

      Anne 4 years ago from Spain

      Hola Joanveronica. I love nasturtiums and keep trying to grow them here in Spain, but it´s just too dry. I have tried them in the garden and in pots, the latter to try to keep them in more moist conditions but still get nowhere with them. I love the emperor of India variety too, but all the colours are lovely, and I do use the leaves and flowers in salads. Didn´t know the leaves were good for dry skin though. Hasta lavista !!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi debbie, thanks for the visit and the comment! I'm glad you now like Nasturtiums, they are very useful and decorative plants! They are classified as a self-seeding annual. This means they disappear for a period and then come back on their own! They are no trouble! And in some localities they won't even disappear at all, I know our last batch, in Concepcion, was there all the time! So go ahead and plant them!

      Hi bac2basics, so sorry your Nasturtiums don't flourish Maybe you need to install a sprinkler? To immitate a moist atmosphere? I don't really know about extra dry climates, central Chile is usually damp, or at least moist. But the Conquistadores took them from Peru to Spain and from there spread them through Europe, so something should work! Wishing you luck!

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      These are such a simple flower design but yet so striking. I love your photo post of the drop of water on the leaf. They seem to be simple enough to care for and adjust to most climates.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi teaches, indeed they are very uncomplaining plant companions! And they add a lot of color, besides being useful. Thank you for the visit and the comment!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This hub brought back some lovely memories from my childhood, Joan. My father was the gardener in my family, and he loved to plant nasturtiums, which we would eat in salads. I didn't know about their medicinal benefits, though. Thanks for the information.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, so glad you like it! I love the colors of the flowers. Thanks for the visit and the comment! Be happy!

    • Pavlo Badovskyy profile image

      Pavlo Badovskyi 4 years ago from Kyiv, Ukraine

      I knew many plants are eatable, I did not know this one as well :-)

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Pavlo, thanks for the visit and the comment! I've just finished reading one of your Hubs, great work! Have a good day and be happy!

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 4 years ago from Upstate, New York

      Joan - Your hubs are very dear to me. They remind my of my Nana as well. The selections of the blooms are beautiful. This hub also explains why quite a few of my plants are getting nibbled on.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, glad you liked this hub, and that it will provide you with good memories and useful information! Thanks for the visit and the comment. Be happy!

    • Sally's Trove profile image

      Sherri 4 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

      I love your narrative about Granny Madge's gardens and the 1960 earthquakes. What wonderful stories!

      Although I've been a long-time lover of nasturtium as both food and garden ornamentation, I was not aware of its medicinal properties. So, I was very intrigued not only by the medicinal properties you described, but also by the way you came to know of them.

      We have nutritious and beneficial flowers and wild plants all around us, but how to use them is something most of us will never know, unless we are fortunate, as you, to grow up in a tradition that knows them and uses them.

      Thanks so much for broadening my understanding and use of nasturtium. Such an easy-to-grow plant that nourishes the body, heals the wounds, and feeds the eye. Voting up all the way around, and pinning.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Thank you so much for your visit and your interesting comment! It is so nice to receive feedback such as yours, as writing on the Internet is sometimes like throwing a small stone into a deep gully, you have no idea where it will land, and if it will land at all! I'm so glad youi have liked my stories! Have a good day and be happy!

    • profile image

      Mauricio 4 years ago

      Hi Joan!!! Nice article about nasturtium. I'm going to buy some nasturtium seeds right now!!! Kind regards!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mauricio, thanks for the visit, and I hope you enjoy your new Nasturtiums!

    • profile image

      Susana 4 years ago

      You know Joan I am not a very big fan of plants, but it is a beautiful article! Thank you for sharing your stories!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Susana, it's always nice to hear from you, and I'm glad you liked the Hub!

    • profile image

      Sandra Saldivia 4 years ago

      I enjoy a lot your stories Joan. Thanks for that!!! After this article I am seeing with more attention and interesting this flowers...

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Sandra, thanks for the comment! Congratulations on your efforts to write in English, that's the way to go! I'm glad you liked this, and the Nasturtium is a plant that can grow on the balcony of your new flat. Have a good day!

    • mizjo profile image

      mizjo 4 years ago from New York City, NY

      Hi Joanveronica, I got very interested in your family story. I've just finished reading about your intrepid adventurer great-grandfather, and followed on with your grandmother's garden. I can see how you're so proud of them.

      I do love nasturtiums for their gorgeous colors and their edibility. I knew the leaves were high in vitamin C but had never thought of them as being medicinal. I used to grow them when I lived in Ireland, but somehow missed out when I came to the States.

      I'm going to get some seeds next visit to the grocery's. Thanks for the highly informative and beautiful hub.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, thank you for your visit, it's great to know that you are enjoying my family's activities, they were an interesting bunch of people on all sides!

      Thank you for your supportive comment, I do appreciate it! Have a good day, be happy, and go and plant those nasturtiums!

    • alian346 profile image

      alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

      Hiya Joan - at last I'm here! Been so busy!

      You've brought back so many memories of my youth in the Scottish Borders with this Hub. We used to grow these during the spring and summer and they would take the place over. Beautiful plants.

      I used to remember my father giving me a row for eating them - not because he thought they were poisonous but because he loved his nasturtiums and wanted to have some left! BTW - the peas always got hit too - I don't think we ever had any cooked peas from the garden!!

      Thanks again for the memories - it's grand to know they flourish in Chile too!

      Ian.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi again Ian! Glad to see you back, I was sorely missing my "Scottish connection"!

      I totally agree about the nasturtiums, and I'm glad you enjoyed the article! They are very hardy plants, thank goodness! Have a good day and be happy!

    • alian346 profile image

      alian346 4 years ago from Edinburgh, Scotland

      Always am - and you too, I hope!!

      How's the Chilean winter? - the Scottish summer this year is dire!

      Ian.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi again, Ian. The Chilean winter has been coooold so far! Tomorrow looks a little better. I hope!

    • Movie Master profile image

      Movie Master 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Hi Joan

      What a wonderful hub, I was completely absorbed in your words....

      The nasturtium is one of my favourite flowers, it reminds me of my grans cottage garden.

      It was fascinating to read how you coped without fresh water after the earthquakes.

      Thank you and voted up.

      Best wishes Lesley

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, Movie Master, I'm glad you liked the story about the nasturtiums, after you beautiful masterpiece with the azaleas, that is really saying something!

      Thanks for the visit and the vote! Have a good day!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

      Hi I loved your story about how you used them for washing your face, and of course the wonderful vitamin C that helped you overcome the dust and dirt. Your granny madge was a very wise woman! voted up! cheers nell

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 4 years ago from Florida

      I loved this Hub. So interesting to read about the earthquake, etc. You were so lucky to have a Grandma Madge.

      The Nasturtium is a favorite of mine, too.

      I voted this UP, and will share, too. Mary

    • profile image

      ignugent17 4 years ago

      Beautiful story about your granny and I liked all the information about Nasturtium . I really admired the wonder of this plant. It can be an ordinary flower or can be a dish on the table. Voted up and more.

    • Rusti Mccollum profile image

      Ruth McCollum 4 years ago from Lake Oswego, Oregon

      They are so beautiful,my grandma had them too! I love the bright beautiful pic you posted as well.following you now!;-)

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Nell, I have a mistery! I'm sure I wrote a comment to your visit, but it seems to have disappeared?

      Well, it won't hurt to say it again, thanks for your visit,and your so happy comment, You have an uplifting effect, just to read what you write! Especially as we are still facing a dull winter here. Have a good day!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mary, nice to have you visit! I agree, my Granny Madge was really something! People like her seem to be more scarce nowadays, in Chile we would say "we've misplaced the mold and can't make that anymore"

      Thank you so much for the vote and the share! Have a good day!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi ignugent 17, I'm so happy you like my story! Granny Madge lives on in my memories, and there is nobody to follow after me, so this is really my "thank you" to her.

      The Nasturtium is a really extraordinary plant, and so beautiful in large splashes of color! Thank you for the vote, and have a good day!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, Rusti, so nice to meet you! Several readers have mentioned that their grandmothers also planted nasturtiums. Maybe the older generations were wiser than we are?

      I'm glad you liked the pictures, and thanks for the follow, I will be over to visit soon! Have a good day!

    • debbiepinkston profile image

      Debbie Pinkston 4 years ago from Pereira, Colombia and NW Arkansas

      I would love to add these colorful flowers to my garden! Sometimes I don't find much variety at our local stores (Lowes, Home Depot and Walmart). It seems that year after year they have the same plants and it's hard to find some of the best choices! Any suggestions?

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Debbie, I'm so glad you liked the article and the colorful pictures caught your eye! I don't really have much advice for you as I live in Chile, but if I were in your place, I would search the Internet. Now I know there are restriction for importing seeds into another country, but maybe this is not so within the same border limits.

      Another idea is to ask around your community contacts, schools, church, library, etc. and see if anybody has plants. I have usually found that many people are willing to provide seeds, cuttings etc., if you show an interest.

      And my last idea would be to advertise in a local newspaper maybe?

      As to the type of plant, all the ones I bought came with their classification and sizes on the back of the packet, like tall, small, climbing, etc. I hope this helps! Have a good day!

    • Angelo52 profile image

      Angelo52 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Amazing plants and beautiful flowers. The edible and anti-biotic parts are extra goodies. Great article. Voted up and shared.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Angelo, nice to have you visit! I'm so glad you liked my article, it was written from the heart, I love nasturtiums, I think they are wonderful plants, and I'm happy to share stories about my Granny Madge! Thanks for the vote and the share! Have a good day!

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      I love nasturtium but I didn't know about their many uses no I do. If we ever have an earthquake I will tell my family what to do. Voted uP!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Thank you for the visit and the comment! I do hope you never have a major earthquake, nasturtiums or no nasturtiums! Your comment made me laugh, but the experience is really no laughing matter at all! Thank you once again! Have a nice day!

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      Where do I start? What appeared to be a hub just about a beautiful flower turned out to be so much more. Granny Madge, earthquakes, flowers to eat and on and on. You've packed this hub from start to finish.

      Your photos are lovely as well. While the only flower I've ever eaten is a Day Lily I must say the nasturtium salad looks inviting!

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Till, thanks for the visit and the comment! As always, your feedback is so generous, you make all my efforts seem worth while!

      I'm happy you liked this Hub, and I know my Granny Madge will be chortling away in the Beyond. She was quite a character!

      Have a good day, and here's to many more "conversations"!

    • Rolly A Chabot profile image

      Rolly A Chabot 4 years ago from Alberta Canada

      Hi Joan... thanks for writing this and bringing back memories of my grandmother caring for her beloved nasturtiums she took so much pride in growing. This has been very informative indeed... well written.

      Hugs from Canada

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Rolly, nice to see you on my hub! I'm so glad you liked this story, my grandmother was always pottering around her gardens, she enjoyed it so much! It was really fun to write this, and more so when I get visits like yours. So thanks for the visit, the comment and the share, and have a good day from Concepcion, Chile!

    • profile image

      AudraLeigh 4 years ago

      Good morning Joan :) Thank you for sharing your Granny's pretty flowers with us and her recipe for false capers too! I had no idea these were edible! What a good read this morning :)

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Audra, so nice to see you on my Hub! Thanks for the visit, it is much appreciated. Yes indeed, the nasturtium has many qualities, and the false capers are delicious! Also very healthy, the whole plant is one of nature's marvels. Have a good day, and thank you again!

    • Sunshine625 profile image

      Linda Bilyeu 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

      Hi Joan...Beautiful flowers! Thank you for sharing Granny Madge's plants with us! Flowers always bring a smile :)

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Sunshine! I certainly agree about the flowers! I can stand outside some unknown family's house and stare at the flowers for long minutes! It's good to be able to use such lovely photos on Hubpages, too! I always feel they cheer me up! Thanks for the visit and the comment! See you around, and have a good day!

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      Joan, I have heard of Nasturtium being used in salads but have never had one. Now, you have stimulated my curiosity and I may have to try it sometime. Your photos are beautiful examples of this flower. Lovely post, dear lady.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi teaches! Nice to have you visit my Hub! It's really early here (6.00 am), so this is a good start to my day, which promises to be hot. Please do try the salads, etc., especially the false capers, they are better than good!

      Thanks again for the visit and the comment, and have a good day!

    • Mike Robbers profile image

      Mike Robbers 4 years ago from London

      I had never heard before about the Nasturtium flower, thanks for introducing to us yet another of nature's unique beauties Ms. Veronica.. Voted up, awesome and shared.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mike, I'm happy to receive your visit and your comment! Also thanks for the follow and the share! The Nasturtium is an adaptable plant that doesn't mind if the soil is poor, also seeds itself, so very faithful! I'm glad you liked this Hub! Thanks again and have a good day!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      My mother-in-law when she lived in San Antonio, Texas always had nasturtiums in her garden and that was the first time I had ever been served nasturtium blossoms in a salad. This is a wonderful hub filled with good information. Up votes, pinning and sharing.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Peggy, so nice to have you visit my Hub! I'm glad you liked my info on the nasturtium, it's such a faithful plant! And so colorful in the garden too. It brings me so many happy memories, I do so miss the flowers and the bright colors, but I make do with these lovely photos that the internet provides so generously. So thanks for the visit, the comment, the vote, the pin and the share! You've made my day! See you soon!

    • Daisy Mariposa profile image

      Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

      Joan,

      I enjoy reading your articles about Granny Madge's flowers. When I was in grade school, my favorite flower to grow was the nasturtium. I have found memories of learning about flowers from growing nasturtiums from seed.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Daisy, thanks for your visit and comment! I feel very happy when a reader comments on my Granny Madge, she was a wonderful person, full of wisdom, and she knew so many useful thngs. So thanks again, and have a great day!

    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 3 years ago from India

      Wow!beautiful. Have never seen this before.

      Enjoyed the hub and the wonderful photos

      Voted up and shared

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      How fascinating all this information is! I have never grown Nasturtiums, but you really have me wanting to do so. Thanks for a great article!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi thumbi7 I'm so glad you liked this Hub, it's quite one of my favorites! The nasturtium is such a humble flower, compared to others that are more "classy", but it is a very noble companion. So thanks for the visit, the comment and the share. See you!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi rebecca, so happy for your vist and comment! I do hope you will start planting nasturtiums, theyare very noble companions! See you!

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