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Nautical Barware for Your Grog, Cocktails or Shot Glass Shots

Updated on October 22, 2014

Sip Some Grog, or Make Cocktails with Nautical Steins, Barware and Shot Glasses

Aye there, Matey! Sip a pint of Grog in a nautical stein. Or whip up your favorite cocktail recipes using nautical barware and drink accessories.

A nautical themed home bar, whether simple or elaborate, is a great place for a beach house, or if you love the sea, or are a cruiser, boater, or sailor. What old salt wouldn't like a shot from a maritime themed shot glass or to mix a drink with barware in his favorite theme?

Here are some cool ideas for drink accessories and bar ware for you and your ocean loving friends, along with some fun information about Grog, Cocktails, Shot Glasses, and setting up a home bar. (and where to find more.)

Enjoy dreaming of the sea as you browse this page!

page created 03/23/2012.

Aye, Have a Pint of Grog, Matey!

What Is Grog? - Shivver Me Timbers, Matey!

Think it was pirates who came up with the drink called grog? Think again!

The Royal Navy officially provided set rations of grog to sailors as early as 1740.

Since the fresh water loaded on at the beginning of a long sea voyage did not remain fresh for long, rum was added to the twice daily water rations to counter the taste of the slime and algae that developed in the casks. It is said that the name 'grog' was after the nickname of Vice Admiral Edward Vernon, who was called "Old Grog," because he wore a grogram coat.

Shortly, lime and/or lemon juice was added on Admiral Vernon's ships. Though the aim was to improve the taste, the sailors had inadvertently stumbled on a way to prevent scurvy!

And guess what? The term "limey" - comes from the Royal Navy sailors eating limes, and drinking lime-flavored grog!

The Craft of the Cocktail: - Everything You Need to Know to Be a Master Bartender

with 500 Recipes

The Craft of the Cocktail, in addition to the recipe for Navy Grog, has lots of extras, from how to stock a bar and tips from pros, to stories, and fast facts.

If you've been on a cruise, you've probably had a cocktail at sea (or two,) maybe even a foo-foo drink. Want to know how to make it? You'll probably find the recipe here.

Also includes additional information, such as

  • Detailed instructions for beginners
  • A directory of glass types
  • The 100 best bars in the world
  • The 14 key alcoholic ingredients, which make a minimum of 450 cocktails
  • The 9 essential juices and mixers

A Glass of Grog
A Glass of Grog | Source

What's in Grog Today?

Is there a Recipe for Grog?

You just learned Grog began as basically watered down rum. It was usually about four parts water to one part rum.

But, what is in Grog these days?

Apparently, it depends on where in the world you are. According to a Wikipedia article on Grog, in Sweden, it's a mixture of a single liquor with a single soft drink, while in Australia, "grog" means any acholic drink.

Hot or cold?

Grog can be served either hot or cold, and hot grog is usually garnished with a cinnamon stick, and perhaps an orange wedge.

There are a number of different recipes for Grog. If you'd like to explore some of them, several links follow.

Parrots of the Caribbean Mugs and coasters

Source

Nautical Steins and Matching Coasters

for your Grog or Beer

You can find nautical beer mugs, some even with matching coasters, at on demand printer Zazle.


Source

Cocktails

Source
Cocktails
Cocktails | Source

Cocktails

There is no definitive source as to the origin of the word "cocktail," but rather, a number of stories. Several have to do with rooster's (cock'c) tails, and a couple are connected to the tails of horses, among others.

However, the first printed reference in America appeared in 1803 in a publication called the Farmer's Cabinet. Then, in an 1806 publication, the ingredients of a cocktail were listed as spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters.

Today, however, mixed drinks containing alcohol are generally referred to as cockails.

Cocktails photo from Morguefile

Barware and Drink Accessories - with Cool Maritime Themes

Make your home bar area a nautical haven with a few accessories or bar ware pieces sporting a nautical theme.

Popular Cocktail Recipes

You can find the 100 most popular cocktail recipes at Barmeister.com.

According to that site, the top five are:

Rum & Coke

White Russian

7 & 7

Jager Bomb #1

Screwdriver

Shot Glasses

Shot Glass Collectors

Shot glasses have become very popular souvenirs, and a lot of people collect them. Are you one of them?

Do you collect shot glasses?

See results
Cruise Ship Shot Glasses
Cruise Ship Shot Glasses | Source

Shot Glasses Used to be Called Jiggers

Originally called jiggers, the small glasses for pouring a 'shot' or dose of whiskey are now commonly called shot glasses. Before 1940, jigger was the more common term.

Just how the term "shot glass" came to be is lost in history, but some theories include:

- That they were named after Friedrich Schott, of the German factory, Jenaer Glaswerk Schott & Genossen

- That American cowboys traded shots (cartridges loaded with gunpowder) for a drink of whiskey

- That, when meat was commonly killed, a small glass was kept on the dinner table for dropping birdshot into when some was found in the meat.

How Much Liquor in a Shot?

How much liquor is there in a shot? Once again, like the recipe for grog, it depends on where you are. For example, in Turkey, a shot is "two fingers."


Shot Glass

Source

How Much Liquor is in a Shot?

ow much liquor is there in a shot? Like the recipe for grog, it depends on where you are. For example, in Turkey, a shot is "two fingers."

However, for those who like a more precise answer, here are some actual definitions from around the world.

The measure of a shot in milliliters varies by country. Germany and Denmark have the smallest shot, at 20 mL, and South Korea's 60 mL shot is the largest.

In Canada, it's 1.5 fluid ounces, and 1.25 - to 1.5 fl. oz. in the United States.

In a couple of places, a shot is legally defined: The State of Utah (1.5 ounces) and South Africa (25 mL.)

Double shots are not universally twice the size of single shots - just in some places!

Half, small, or "pony" shots are also NOT universally equal to 1/2 of a regular shot.

Nautical Barware Collectibles

If you are a collector, keep an eye out on eBay. You never know when that hard to find item might pop up there!

Home Bars

How to Set Up a Home Bar - Basics for a Bar at Home

Master Mixologist Manny Hinojosa explains the a basics of what is needed for a home bar in terms of alcohol, mixers, bar tools and glassware.

type=mixing-a-drink
type=mixing-a-drink

Home Bars

can be as simple or as elaborate as you choose.

For those who frequently entertain others who imbibe, or host cocktail parties in their home, a home bar is essential.

Now, your bar can be as simple as a section set aside in your kitchen cabinet for bottles of liquor, mixers, glassware, and mixing equipment.

For those the budget to dedicate to such persuits, there are numerous options, all the way up to a room for entertaining with a fully stocked wet bar.

Whether your bar is simple, elaborate, or somewhere in between, maybe you have or would like some barware with a nautical theme, like some of the things shown on this page.

Bartender (public domain, from Open Clip Art)

Fun Nautical Bar Accessories - for your bar at home

These really are accessories that anyone can use, whether they have an actual 'bar' at home or not.

Playful Dolphins Marine Life Glass Top Accent Table
Playful Dolphins Marine Life Glass Top Accent Table

A friend has a glass topped pedestal table very similar to this at his place of business, and it's just stunning.

 

Do you have a bar at your house?

My home bar is as simple as they come. I usually have a bottle of red wine. I also own wine glasses and a corkscrew. And there may bea couple of cold beers in the fridge.

That's it.

What about you?

Voting

Which of the following best describes the bar at your house?

See results

Hlepful Links

Here are some links that may help you with your research and planning . Lots of good ideas for home bars are to be found on the web. These are just a few of them.

So, settle back... maybe pour a cup of hot grog,

and enjoy exploring the possibilities.

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    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I like a Nautical bar theme, its handsome.

      Nice collection of items you have. :)

    • profile image

      cruiselinefans 5 years ago

      Great grog recipe! We make Glug at Christmas time - and set it aflame - turns blue. Thanks for posting!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Nautical things are interesting to collect. Like the way you introduced this topic.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 6 years ago

      Very cool ideas. Perfect for entertaining.

    • profile image

      AlleyCatLane 6 years ago

      I like the interesting facts you interspersed among the items for sale. Adds a lot of interest.

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