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Perennial Flowering Vines

Updated on December 10, 2015

Colorful & Low Maintenance

Perennial flowering vines are a great choice to cover up fences, arbors and will add a little interest to any garden. These low maintenance vines will provide you with years of joy and add a touch of color to any area that can use it. Plus, they are easy to grow if you give them room to thrive.

Keep in mind when you plant any of the vines listed below that you have to allow the vine enough room to grow and spread. A vine that is not permitted to have space is a vine that will not thrive to its fullest potential. Certain vines can even become invasive and prevent other plants from growing. Do your research before planting any perennial vines.

Each of the vines listed below have similar requirements. You can easily “train” your vine to trail where you would like it too. They all need something to grow up or enough room on the ground to grow out; however you do have to be mindful of other plants. Vines like to wrap around anything they find and if they find another plant nearby they do not have a problem wrapping around it, blocking light from the plant and possibly smothering it completely.

Morning Glories

Morning glories climb up this wire trellis. These flowers open and close with the sun, and the large blue blooms are plentiful with this vine. Given adequate moisture and sunlight, morning glories will survive and thrive for many seasons.
Morning glories climb up this wire trellis. These flowers open and close with the sun, and the large blue blooms are plentiful with this vine. Given adequate moisture and sunlight, morning glories will survive and thrive for many seasons. | Source

Some Favorites

There are quite a few favorites when it comes to perennial flowering vines. The Morning Glory with its stunning blue flowers that open and close like clock work are great plants that will thrive in most hardiness zones. They are thin vines with brightly colored blue flowers.

  • Honeysuckle is another popular vine that is very aromatic and has sunny yellow flowers, it grows well in most hardiness zones but does have to be monitored because it grows quickly and can easily become invasive.
  • Wisteria offers huge bundles of flowers and a vine that can easily reach 25 feet in length. The fragrant flowers bloom up to three times or more in some cases each season. The flowers are about a foot long and the smell is simply divine. Wisteria has a woody vine that has been known to pull structures down so you do want to monitor growth.
  • Clematis is also a popular perennial flowering vines option. It grows from 8-12 feet and looks lovely around mail boxes and even in containers on the patio.

Favorites

Honeysuckle is an attractive plant for pollinators, including bees and butterflies. The smell from these flowers is a delightful benefit of allowing this vine to thrive.
Honeysuckle is an attractive plant for pollinators, including bees and butterflies. The smell from these flowers is a delightful benefit of allowing this vine to thrive. | Source
Wisteria is one of the most beautiful perennial flowering vines (in my opinion). Their delicate colorful flowers are beautiful and look quite different than other vines.
Wisteria is one of the most beautiful perennial flowering vines (in my opinion). Their delicate colorful flowers are beautiful and look quite different than other vines. | Source
The stunning flowers of the clematis vine will add an almost tropical feel to your yard or garden. Clematis is actually a member of the buttercup variety of flowers.
The stunning flowers of the clematis vine will add an almost tropical feel to your yard or garden. Clematis is actually a member of the buttercup variety of flowers. | Source

Clematis - Queen of the Vines?

Don't Forget the Roses

People typically think of roses as being in a different category than perennial flowering vines, but the climbing varieties of roses are in fact vines, and they do return every year, meaning they are perennial. There are a full range of options when it comes to climbing rose varieties.

There is also a full color range to consider. From small tea roses in shades of pink and white to large roses in deep blood red colors. The Lady Banks climbing rose in white has a ruffled look while the Joseph's Coat Climbing Rose has a more traditional rose look with a deeper color palette. This variety is named after "Joseph's Coat of Many Colors" as their blooms are reminiscent of those mentioned in the biblical story. If interest is what you are after, the Josephs Coat Climbing Rose is a stunning option.

The dark crimson buds open to orange blooms that turn to a canary yellow before reaching full maturity and turning back to crimson. It is like having four plants in one!

Climbing Roses

Many varieties of roses are actually climbing vines. Roses are beautiful, fragrant flowers that can be trained to grow up and around less-impressive plants in your garden. Plant perennial flowering vines in spots needing visual interest.
Many varieties of roses are actually climbing vines. Roses are beautiful, fragrant flowers that can be trained to grow up and around less-impressive plants in your garden. Plant perennial flowering vines in spots needing visual interest. | Source

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    • howtoguru profile image
      Author

      Tyler Norwood 2 years ago from Texas

      Thanks for commenting! The best time to plant most perennials (including vines) is right after the last frost (generally, April-June in the USA, depending on your location). Since perennials time their blooms with the seasons, almost all of these plants will die back after the first frost until the next season (failure to die would mean the plants are evergreen, not perennial).

      Some of my favorite perennial vines, such as the Morning Glory, will refuse to bloom until later in the season, so planting this vine very early will result in a much larger, far-reaching vine that might become too large and invasive. With this in mind, you can wait to plant certain vines like the Morning Glory until July or August if your growing season lasts well into October.

    • emi sue profile image

      Emily Lantry 2 years ago from Tennessee

      Great ideas! I love vines, but I haven't gotten any to start growing yet. I would love to have some climbing roses. Would you know when the best time to plant is?

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