ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Planning Your Backyard Garden For A Self-Sufficient Lifestyle

Updated on February 20, 2014

So You Want to Be Self-sufficient, Eh?

Well there is no better time to start than now.

First things first. Being totally self-sufficient in the city may be a myth. In this modern world it really is a utopia few people attain. Still, we can all become more self-sufficient, and starting a backyard garden or mini-farm is a great step in the right direction. The satisfaction one gains from growing vegetables from seed cannot be measured in dollars, but the savings to your grocery bill most certainly can be. Add to that the fact that when you grow organically you no longer have to worry about poisons in your food supply.

Whether you have a postage-stamp size backyard or an acre or two to play with, the following suggestions can get you started on the road to self-sufficiency.

Find out what is allowed in your area
Find out what is allowed in your area | Source

Municipal Regulations

Before you ever put shovel to sod, check with your local government to find out what is allowed in your area. There are two types of municipal regulations to be concerned about. The first is zoning. A city is divided into certain zones which determine what is allowed and what is not allowed on property. Some cities do not allow chickens in an urban area; some allow chickens but no roosters. Some cities allow vegetable gardens in the front yard; some only in the back yard. If you plan on building structures such as a tool shed or chicken coop you will have to check on the setback regulations which tell you the distance from the lot line to a permanent structure.

The other regulation to be considered is an easement. This has to do with the access to utilities and might also include a neighbor’s right to share a driveway or curb strips.

Of course, if you plan on building a structure, you will also have to abide by local building codes….or you can do what I do and just not mention it to the city officials. J

Our entire garden sees at least six hours of sun daily
Our entire garden sees at least six hours of sun daily | Source

Assessing Sunlight

Many a gardener/farmer has failed because they did not assess the sunlight situation in their yard. Before you make your final plans you must know what areas of your yard receive full sun and what areas receive partial sun or no sun at all.

Full sun plants like tomatoes, squash, pepper and peas, need a minimum of six hours of sunlight. Anything less and they have no chance of growing to their full potential. Again, that is six hours minimum; they can, in fact, handle much more than six hours.

Other plants do better in partial sun/shade. Plants like lettuce, cooking greens, some herbs, do well in four hours of sun.

If you plan on having rabbits and/or chickens, shade is preferred during the summer months, so that needs to be considered as well.

Remember, when assessing your yard for sunshine, it does no good to assess it during the winter. The angle of the sun will change drastically by late spring, so plan accordingly. Of course, if you have no trees or tall buildings to block the sun, then the matter is moot.

BRAINSTORM

Now for the fun part of this project. Sit down and decide what it is you want in your mini-farm. Make a list of all the things you would like to have. You may not be able to get to them all; your site might not be welcoming to all of your ideas; still, make a list and you can weed out ideas later that just won’t work on your site.

A very basic plan is helpful
A very basic plan is helpful | Source

Draw a Site Plan

Next you need to draw a plan that will serve as your blueprint for the future. Using standard 8x11 graph paper is the best way to make this plan. First you will need to go outside and measure your yard, and then make your graph according to scale.

Include everything in your drawing, from trees to outbuildings to fences. When the drawing is completed it should be an accurate depiction of what your yard currently looks like.

Then you can start planning your new additions. Where will the garden go? Where will the chicken coop go? Plan on future growth while you are at it. What about those grape vines that will indeed spread? How about your children’s jungle gym?

Some other things to consider:

  • If possible, locate any livestock away from the lot lines and as far away from neighbors as possible.
  • Make sure you include room for pathways so you can get that wheelbarrow where it is needed.
  • Try to plan so that things are handy. Having the herbs near the kitchen would be a good idea; having a compost bin between the chicken coop and the garden is smart planning.
  • Give yourself room between raised beds. Usually two feet of space is adequate for moving around and getting supplies where they are needed.
  • Plan for watering. Where is the water supply and how are you going to get it to the garden?
  • Plan on a power source as well.

Once you have your plans drawn up you can take the next step, a fun little project if you have children.

Make a Model

Using popsicle sticks, clay or foam-core board, make a ½-inch-to-the-foot scale model of your future backyard farm. While this may seem like overkill to some people, for others the visual model is a big help…and if you have kids this is a wonderful way to get them involved in the process.

The added benefit to making such a model is that you now can slide things around in an attempt to find the perfect arrangement rather than drawing a new scale map should you change your mind.

Final Check

It is time for one last reality check. Why are we being so careful? Simply because once you have done the work of digging gardens and building structures, you sure don’t want to undo the work. It’s better to be ultra-safe than sorry. The old adage in carpentry is to measure twice and cut once; the same theory can be applied in planning your backyard self-sufficiency center.

Take your scale model outside and use it as a guide as you mark off everything you plan on adding. Use landscapers spray paint or baking soda and make outlines of everything that is on your plan. Once you have finished you will get a very realistic view of what your yard will look like once everything is completed. Chances are you will see glitches to your plan once you have followed this step.

And Begin

The planning is complete and now it is time to roll up your sleeves and get to work. Remember, not everything has to be done at once. If your scale drawing takes three years to make a reality then so be it. Enjoy the process rather than curse it.

Self-sufficiency is the dream of many and the reality of a growing number of people. There are many, this writer included, who believe that self-sufficiency will be needed in the years to come as the economy worsens and people are forced to fend for themselves. Why wait for that to happen? Get started now so that when the worst happens you will be producing vegetables, fruits, and berries in abundant quantities. Then I’ll be glad to teach you about canning.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Again, this is more my dad's thing with gardening and such. So, will totally pass on to him and huge thank you again for sharing your thoughts and ideas further with us today on this. Happy Thursday, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Janine! I suspect you dad knows this and much more...but thank you and enjoy the heck out of your day.

    • profile image

      dragonflycolor 3 years ago

      I'm gearing up to start planting some starts this next month. I hope it goes well. Thanks!

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      Though I am extremely envious of your productive garden...we prob. will not be following suit. Several reasons--our yard is total rocks..long story there. and the soil is treacherous. However I love reading about your adventures in nature and your lovely chickens. Say hi to Penny for me.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 years ago from Queensland Australia

      More good advice and instructions in your self-sufficiency series Bill. Your hubs give such straight forward and clear instructions that no one can say it's too difficult. Even people who live in apartments and don't have a yard can grow vegetables in pots as long as they have a balcony or courtyard that gets enough sun. Have a great day.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Good luck Mari and thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I would go nuts living where you live. LOL I will tell Penny you said hello and thank you for stopping by...I hope all is well with your bag business.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      True words, John. In fact, maybe that will be a new hub....Gardens for apartment dwellers. :) Thanks for the idea.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      I love the idea of the model. Essential if you're a 'visual' person. A drawing just isn't so life-like and, as you say, it's a wonderful way to involve children.

      Do you think I'd be taking it too far if I built a model to plan out my pots? The largest one is about 0.75m diameter. I'm not sure if I can manage without a plan! I've bought the seeds and already have my herbs so we're well into the urban garden; not sure if the patio slabs can stand the weight though.

      Seriously, this is a great idea and so useful for those starting out - a step-by-step guide is essential with so many things. I hope you're planning a self-sufficiency book with all these things included; it would make a fortune.

      Hey, we have sunshine! I need to go and soak up the rays in the garden to last me for the next few weeks of rain. Will that make me grow too? I could do with a couple more inches (upwards not outwards).

      An informative and fun read, as ever, bill. Ann

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 3 years ago from Massachusetts

      Just what I needed as I prepare for my garden this Spring. Thanks for sharing your expertise Bill. Have a great day.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      I am still contemplating planting a vegetable garden. Mine will have to waist high because I really don't want to bend. If I don't follow through, I can always visit the farms in my area or I can move next door to you!!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      This may be a stupid question, but when placing the raised bed frames on the ground, do you clear the earth beneath first? In other words, remove any grass, etc.? Also, do you till the soil beneath the frames before adding dirt to the beds?

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, you have me laughing, so thanks for the morning gift. To heck with this hub...go get out in the sun and dry off some of that mold. :) Thank you my dear; let me know what the sunshine feels like.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, Bill, you are too kind. Expertise? Just experience...I'm no expect but I do know what works and what doesn't work. :) Good luck with that garden.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, I'm not sure which option is best to tell you the truth. LOL I think visiting the local farms is the perfect solution for someone adverse to bending. LOL I don't know how far you are from me but I'll let the next door neighbor know they might have to move soon.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha.....yes and yes! How's that for succinct answers? Digging as deeply as you can is a great plan....that loosens deeply and gives the compost a real chance to do some good, and it makes it easier on deep-rooted plants to survive.

    • cecileportilla profile image

      Cecile Portilla 3 years ago from West Orange, New Jersey

      You make gardening sound fun and easy billybuc. I usually just do tomatoes. Maybe with my son's help I can add more vegetables this spring. Very informative as always!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      The sunshine is great; I'm sure those people down on the Levels are so grateful to see it too. They need a break from all that water, rotting carpets and ruined farmland. Hope you have some sunshine, real or spiritual. Ann

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Donna Brown 3 years ago from Alton, Missouri

      Considering the cost of food these days, especially meat, growing your own fruits, vegetables, and small animals is definitely a way to make ends meet. As far as zoning is concerned, just because where you live is zoned against a practice, doesn't mean that it has to stay that way. For instance, if your neighborhood is zoned against having chickens, find out exactly what the neighbors might have against keeping them. Perhaps the primary reason is that no one wants to wake up to a rooster crowing. Perhaps it has to do with smell. Once you know what your neighborhood issues really are, you can take it to the zoning board (or whatever your community calls it) and ask to allow chickens but with those stipulations. Be sure to include the "no rooster" or no smell" neighbors are in agreement. It can be done, it just matters how important it is to you to have access to the small animals.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      cecileportilla, I never want it to sound easy. LOL Digging the ground is not easy at all...but it is peaceful and rewarding for sure. :) Thank you as always for stopping by.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Coming soon, Ann...sunny weekend is predicted...right now the rain is horizontal. LOL

    • RealHousewife profile image

      Kelly Umphenour 3 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      All of this stuff has been on my mind...I've got spring fever and I'm ready to see some green stuff growing!

      I started my seeds in the kitchen yesterday! I just couldn't wait any longer:)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kelly, great idea starting them in the kitchen....why didn't I think of that? LOL Thanks, buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donna, you are so right. These changes are all possible; it just takes the willingness to make them happen. Zoning is one of those things that will never happen unless someone makes it happen. Great suggestions.

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      I think it would be fun to plan something like this! Thanks for sharing tips and things to consider. Some of these things I would not have thought of.

      Have a great day!

      Voted up and sharing.

      ~ Kathryn

    • Sheri Faye profile image

      Sheri Dusseault 3 years ago from Chemainus. BC, Canada

      I have just moved from a house with a big yard and lots of gardens to a condo...no patch of dirt I am afraid, but still will do lots of container gardens full of lettuce, herbs and tomatoes. I have seen some articles on how people in suburbs have gotten rid of lawns and planted tons of veggies...enough to even sell! It is amazing how much you can grow in a small place! Great article and should do well as more and more people seem to be heading in this direction.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure Kathryn! Thanks for stopping by; I hope you're able to have a garden soon.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheri, I love that you are going to do all that container gardening. Good for you. Here in Olympia we see quite a few places where the lawn was tore up and a garden put in its place...I love it!

      Thank you Sheri!

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 3 years ago from Missouri

      You know I have my garden planned! Can't wait to begin; we're running low on pickles! Only @36 quarts left. Great job at showing all how to fulfill that little green thumb in all of us, Bill. Best to you and Bev!

    • profile image

      Tina Truelove 3 years ago

      I have 2.5 acres out back. Every year I say I will start a small vegetable garden. Every year, I don't. I need to get busy. Thank you for the helpful information. I have pinned this article for future reference.

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 3 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      I would love to have more room than my little back yard one day. I have a few raised beds and could stick things here and there as well. I need more time, too! Perhaps one day. I would love to grow enough to have to can stuff. My mom cans the most wonderful stuff--green beans, pickled okra, tomatoes, pickles! Another great hub, Bill, on self-sufficiency. While I haven't incorporated a whole lot, your hubs keep reminding me the direction in which I want to go, even if eventually . . . . Now, if we could do something about that black thumb of mine. Could you write a hub on that???

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      I enjoy working in my little garden it is such a pleasure to prepare for the new season soon to be and have many good ideas each year I try to make a better garden and I am getting there. Great photos!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheez, Mike, you better hurry if you only have 35 quarts left. LOL Thanks, buddy, and Happy gardening to you. Blessings, of course, to you and your family.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tina, start small and add to it. Starting a garden is a lot of work; adding to it is not. Good luck; I hope this year is the year.

      Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...Vicki, I had the same color of thumb. I just learn by trial and error and I'm not sure anyone wants to read about that. I find out what works and duplicate it...find out what doesn't work and don't do it again. Time consuming and annoying at times, but it works for me. :)

      Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, I love that you enjoy gardening. I love getting my hands dirty and seeing the little sprouts begin....great, relaxing hobby. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      This is such an awesome Hub Billy! I am a farm girl. My grandfather used to plant rows and rows of sweet corn. I have pictures of us standing in it when I was a teenager. But then at some point, he planted a row of cedar trees along the driveway which is 500 feet up to a wooden area. Today, 20 some years later, those cedar trees are very tall.

      The garden that he fenced in is now under shade all of the time because of the trees.

      I have a pet pig and we compost veggie clippings and the pig "stuff" for our garden every year. People come by to borrow some because we have the most amazing phlox growing around our front stone wall.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      This is a wonderful guide showing all the things that need to be considered. I really enjoy gardening and planning it is a big part of the fun. Last year my husband and I had a huge garden. We consider that our trial and error period. Now, this year we are only growing the things we had the most success with. That takes us down from planting 70+ vegetables to exactly 22 vegetables. It's more manageable. We start with seeds indoors and then move them to the plant beds when they're reading to go outside. Just talking about gardening makes me want to go plant something.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brandi, I come from Iowa corn farmers...I loved walking among the rows, way over my head, listening to them blow in the wind...great memories...very cool that you have a pet pig. I love that you use the pig stuff....thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, you use the same method I use...try it and if it works do it again....if not, don't! Pretty simple method I think. :) I know, I want to go out and get dirty right now. Sigh! Maybe in another month.

      Thanks for being here my friend.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 3 years ago from london

      So you are a gardener too, Bill. My Father was a master. Not for me, though. Still, it's a loving and excellent topic. Useful ideas here.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      Dear billybuc,

      Thanks so much!!!

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Another helpful hub, thank you Bill. I will be glad when i can plant my garden. It is dark and gloomy here today with the possibility of tornadoes. Yuck..

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      Thanks for the helpful ideas. It's a challenge to grow vegetables down here because the sun is so hot in the summer. It's like you need to water 10 times a day. It's easier to grow stuff that you harvest soon after they sprout, like herbs and mesclun greens.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I appreciate it manatita....always good to see you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You betcha breakfastpop!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tornadoes, Ruby! Yuck indeed! No thank you...I'm fine here in Washington. :) Stay safe and thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, just shoot me now if I had to live in that state. You really need to move the family out west....we'll save a spot for you on our future farm. :)

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      I am ready to get started. I have always felt closer to God digging in His Good Earth! I may just write a hub on that ... digging in His Good Earth. Thanks for all the great tips here at getting started. I may start out on my deck lol, and then work my way into the yard. Around here, even though we have a privacy fence down, I might have to build a tell fence around the planters to protect from rabbits eating my carrots LOL ...it's true.

      Up and more and sharing

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • DREAM ON profile image

      DREAM ON 3 years ago

      There is nothing like getting down and dirty. When I plant as long as I get just one tomato I am happy. I found it a good idea to fence off the garden area with chicken wire. We have some deer at night that like to go in for a snack.As always so much fun to join you on any adventure. In the garden was so much pleasure too.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      Great suggestions, Bill! And you are right to point out the municipal regulations. Even within the city the rules are not the same. I know that for something as simple as clotheslines, some sections of Ottawa don't have the right to have them. It's too bad because they save energy!

      Sunlight is also so important. When I first planted my red currant bushes, they didn't grow because there was too much shade of a big tree; when I switched them on the other side of my backyard, they grew fast and are producing nice crops of fruits! Each detail is important with gardening!

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 3 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      I confess, I try hard with plants and I will admit defeat from my hubby who's so passionate about gardening and stuff. I adore his garden though. We used to have some herbs, vegetables and fruit bearing plants but the racoons are a lot faster to harvest them. :)

      Will certainly be passing this hub along to him.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, I love the idea for your future hub and I look forward to it. Very true my friend....closer to God!

      Good luck with those giant rabbits. :)

      blessings always

      bill

    • jhamann profile image

      Jamie Lee Hamann 3 years ago from Reno NV

      This is excellent and incredibly useful information to use on our non-landscaped acreage. Hopefully we will have the garden built and producing veggies in two summers. Jamie

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dream On, good to see you again my friend. Those deer can be quite the hungry little buggers...good idea with the chicken wire. I'll have to try that with the extra wire we have to protect our berries out front.

      Thanks as always.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      kidscrafts, I find that amazing that clotheslines would not be allowed...not surprising but amazing for all the obvious reasons. Good tip on the red current bushes; we have some and I'll have to check out the sunlight on them. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cris, try the chicken wire idea; it really does keep out the raccoons; our chickens can attest to that.

      Always nice to see you; take care and have a wonderful weekend.

      bill

    • Perspycacious profile image

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      I didn't see soil testing mentioned, and in my area of Utah February is the time for planting seeds I will later transplant into my garden. Existing fruit trees (if they exist) need a spraying schedule, and some localities require that, if you have fruit trees, they get sprayed to protect other fruit tree growers trees. Serious gardeners can go even further and make a chart of what is to be planted, planting depths, distances between rows and patches, thinning distances, germination times, and harvest times. Plus planning for replanting as crops are harvested is a good idea, as well as making use of fences, and poles for things that can grow vertically and maximize space usage. Planting in pots is another alternative for folks with limited space. Potential "Hub of The Day", especially with all these good comments.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sounds fantastic, Jamie. I wish you well on that garden. Thank you and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Perspycacious, I thank you for mentioning that. I was just trying to discuss the planning stage of the garden, but soil testing is a must before the actual planting occurs. HOTD? I'm beginning to think it will never happen for me, but thank you.

    • Anne Harrison profile image

      Anne Harrison 3 years ago from Australia

      I realised total self-sufficiency was out of my reach when I worked out I needed at least fifty strawberry plants for my family of 4. But as you point out, that's no reason not to grow a few; every home-grown lettuce or tomato decrease our footprint (not to mention the taste!) Voted up

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Anne, thank you for the visit and your comment. Yes indeed! It is not all or nothing; every act of self-sufficiency helps this planet. I like how you think. Thanks for the follow and have a great weekend.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is a useful and encouraging hub, Bill. I am so looking forward to setting up my garden this year! The produce garden will be a small space, since my dogs need room to play. I always enjoy growing vegetables and fruits, though.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing these interesting tips, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, I am right there with you. Can't wait to get my hands dirty and start planting. :) Thank you and enjoy your weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are welcome, vkwok; thank you!

    • Perspycacious profile image

      Demas W Jasper 3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      Just nominated this Hub of yours for the Hub Of The Day. Perhaps some of these other Commenters will also put in a vote for it, as long as they remember to copy this URL before they go to the official nomination form on their start up page. Good luck!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Perspycacious, you are too kind. Thank you so much!

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      It is so much better to be safe than sorry. After all, good food should be enjoyed by all, not the minority.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, it seems to me that having good food to eat is a basic right....hopefully I can change a few minds along the way. Thanks as always.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I've got a brown thumb but somehow every year am determined to try anew, ever hopeful. That watering thing gets me every time around mid-summer. I start out like gangbusters then forget.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Flourish, I might be like you if I didn't live somewhere where water is not a problem. The skies open up here and take watering out of my hands thank goodness. :) Best wishes this summer; let's hope that brown thumb turns green. :) Thank you!

    • Lilleyth profile image

      Suzanne Sheffield 3 years ago from Mid-Atlantic

      Good to know before the EMP hits us!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Lilleyth. :) Thank you!

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      Well because of your hubs, I am planning on planting a lot of things on our deck this year. One other thing folks have to consider are homeowner/condo association rules. Some places don't permit certain types of gardens, I know we are not permitted to have fences around gardens. Growing up we were not allowed to plant anything without approval.

    • peeples profile image

      Peeples 2 years ago from South Carolina

      Going through and Bookmarking some of your hubs. We have decided to convert part of our yard into raised beds and an area for chickens. Love knowing I have someone experienced to follow and learn from as we go. Now if I could just find people who deliver pallets!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Milisa, come here and you'll never be short of pallets. :) I'm glad to hear you're going to have chickens and a garden. If I can be of any help feel free to contact me.

    Click to Rate This Article