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Plant Wild Flowers To Attract Hummingbirds

Updated on February 28, 2012
Hummingbird Feeding
Hummingbird Feeding

Hummingbird Gardens

If you want to attract hummingbirds to your property the best way is to plant a hummingbird garden. Hummingbirds feed by sight. They also follow the same routes while feeding but they are naturally inquisitive behavior will lead them to a new food source and a new stop on their traplining or feeding route. If you take the time in the selection of you plants and choose plants that flower at successively later dates, you will enjoy the company of these happy birds throughout the season.

Like most birds, hummingbirds have almost no sense of smell. Therefore the flowers that attract them have little or no fragrance.

Since these flowers do not expel as much energy producing fragrance. They direct this energy towards visibility and high nectar production. You should try to plant wild starins of flowers and not hybrid versions as these flowers often produce less nectar than their wild counterparts. Your local nursery should be able to help you choose locally wild flowers.

Also remember that Hummingbirds need to perch between feedings or protecting their territories. These birds spend 60% to 80% of their time perched. Twigs, clotheslines and leaf stems make good perches.

Hummingbird Mint
Hummingbird Mint
Quince Flower
Quince Flower
Tobacco Plant Flower
Tobacco Plant Flower
Azalea Flower
Azalea Flower
Morning Glory
Morning Glory

This is a list of flowering plants that attract hummingbirds

Trees & Shrubs

Azalea

Butterfly Bush

Cape Honeysuckle

Flame Acanthus

Flowering Quince

Lantana

Mimosa

Red Buckeye

Tree Tobacco

Turk’s Cap

Weigela

Vines

Coral Honeysuckle

Cypress Vine

Morning Glory

Scarlet Runner Bean

Flowers

Perennials

Bee Balm

Canna

Cardinal Flower

Columbine

Coral Bells

Four O’Clocks

Foxglove

Hosta

Hummingbird Mint

Little Cigar

Lupine

Penstemon

Yucca

Annuals


Beard Tongue

Firespike

Fuchsia

Impatiens

Jacobiana

Jewelweed

Petunia

Several Salvia species

Shrimp plant

ATTENTION

Avoid using pesticides to protect your flowers from insects. Hummingbirds accually eat small soft bugs such as gnats, spiders, mosquitoes ans caterpillars amonst others. If a hummingbird eats a bug covered in pesticides it can become ill or die.

Hummingbird facts

  • The brain of a hummingbird is 4.2% of its body weight, which is the largest in the bird kingdom.
  • The heart of a hummingbird is 2.5% of its total body weight.
  • A hummingbirds heart can beat up to 1,260 times per minute in flight. And about 250 times per minute at rest.
  • Hummingbirds can remember every flower they have been to, and how long it will take for the flower to refill it’s nectar.
  • Hummingbirds can hear bettewr than humans.
  • Hummingbirds can see farther than humans.
  • Hummingbirds can see untravilot light.
  • Hummingbirds use their tongue to lap nectar.
  • Hummingbirds tongue is shaped like a “W”
  • Hairs on the tongue of a hummingbird, have tiny hairs to aid in lapping nectar.
  • A hummingbirds wings flap approximately 70 times per second
  • And up to 200 when diving. At about 60 miles per hour.
  • Hummingbirds have an average body temperatrure of 107 degrees faharenheight or 40 degrees Celsius.
  • Hummingbirds weigh between 2 and 20 grams ( a penny weighs 2.5 grams)
  • Hummingbirds do not mate for life.
  • Female hummingbirds build their nests alone
  • Hummingbird babys are about the size of a penny.
  • Hummingbirds lifespan is between 5 and 10 years
  • Hummingbirds can fly backwards.
  • Hummingbirds can fly between 500 and 2,000 miles during migration.
  • Hummingbirds eat small bugs for protein.
  • Hummingbirds can visit approximately 1,000 flowers
  • Hummingbirds are only found naturally in the Americas.
  • Hummingbirds have been found as far north as Alaska and as far south as chile
  • Hummingbirds are the second largest birs family in the western Hemisphere with more than 300 species

LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED?

WILL YOU PLANT FLOWERS TO ATTRACT HUMMI(NGBIRD?

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